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Finishing up my Thailand homework

 
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Lack



Joined: 10 Aug 2011
Posts: 98

PostPosted: Tue Feb 07, 2012 3:46 am    Post subject: Finishing up my Thailand homework Reply with quote

I think I'm about ready to apply for something in Thailand. I think I'm finally frustrated enough to actually do it now, and I need a change. I've been reading on ESL and Thailand for months. Now I'm just trying to tie up loose ends because I hate to go for something significant or important and fail to see something I should have known about. And that's what this thread is for. (And maybe it will be sticky worthy and help lots of people too besides myself.)

Ok, so...let me break this into categories:

1. Money. I primarily want to do ESL because I can't find a teaching job in the U.S. because that market is atrocious here.
I have a B.S. in Education/English, and work as a camp counselor, having experience educating kids informally. And I'm a U.S. citizen, obviously a native speaker of English. So from pretty much everything I have read, I will have no problem simply finding a job in Thailand. But I want a little more than bottom of the barrel; at the same time, I'm not expecting the best. Decent will do. My main question here is how much baht per year can I top out at with my current resume? I know this will depend somewhat based on if I worked rurally or in the city.

As far as money issues starting out, I have that base covered. I have $10,000 savings, so getting set up will not be a problem. I want my employer to at least pay for my plane ticket there.

2. Climate. I live in a very hot and humid place, and have all my life, so I'm used to it. I've read plenty about people complaining that they have to wear a suit and tie teaching. Is this true? Do most schools in the LOS require that dress code? I think I could still do it, but that sounds unreasonable.

3. Location. I'm a rural kind of guy. I hate driving, even in the USA. I will never, ever get behind the wheel in another country. Even if money was not an issue. I would much prefer walking. Public Transit is fine. I think I would like trying to live in a large city, but if anyone has an opinion on whether rural or urban is better, my ears are wide open! Also, I want to have plenty to do also. For those who have taught in the LOS, what location(s) do you recommend teaching in?

4. Preparation for teaching. I trained to be a teacher in college, although not in ESL. I am already thinking up ideas for teaching ESL, collecting ideas and resources. I don't want to take a course unless I need to. I am aware that there are some programs in which applicants take an ESL course in their destination country and then teach afterward. If it did not cost a lot, I would be fine with this. Does anyone recommend that route? (And does anyone know of ones that are legit. I'm wary, of course, for what seems like paying for a job, even if it looks like I am paying for a course instead.)

5. The Application process and interviewing and accepting a job, etc.
I have read lots of times that the better jobs are found with boots on the ground. I plan to just apply online. Plane tickets to Asia are very expensive. I'm okay with entry level, but I just want to avoid struggling to make ends meet! So a little play money with a little to save is what I need at minimum. So how much will it hurt to apply/accept online instead of real life?

The second part of this is, how much info should I give to prospective employers? I've looked at lots of job postings for ESl jobs online and tons of them look suspect. I disregard any job listing with gratuitous errors, emoticons, etc. Applying for a job typically requires a social security number at some point, but obviously I'm not going to do that. What about the prospective employer asking for a copy of passport? (I'm getting mine soon, don't have it yet. Not sure exactly what all personal info is on one.) The online aspect plus not personally knowing employers schools makes me nervous giving out even a little contact info. And I realize this is why people tend to suggest going in person, so that one can actually see the employer, workers, and school, and area. I'm really just looking for general tips here.

I have to go right now, but I will add anything later if I forgot. Sorry if anything I posted sounded obtuse, and let me say thanks already for how helpful this board and the posters here tend to be.
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sigmoid



Joined: 21 Jan 2003
Posts: 1002

PostPosted: Tue Feb 07, 2012 4:24 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

repeat post deleted

Last edited by sigmoid on Tue Feb 07, 2012 7:55 am; edited 1 time in total
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sigmoid



Joined: 21 Jan 2003
Posts: 1002

PostPosted: Tue Feb 07, 2012 4:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Just a quick post to cover a few main points.

1) First, with your creds you should really be looking beyond mere ESL language schools. You should be looking at universities/colleges or primary/secondary schools, possibly international schools.

2) You don't have to wear a suit and probably not a tie. You should wear a tie for interviews though. If you have to wear a tie, just leave it in your office and put it on upon arrival.

3) Bangkok is modern and cosmopolitan, but with about 10 million people it can also be atrocious. There is a pretty good public transportation system although the buses leave a lot to be desired. There is a skytrain and subway and also express boats on the river. Taxis and tuk tuks are abundant and motorbike taxis, which may seem to risky for some.

There are many opportunities outside of BKK. You should look into other cities.

4) I wouldn't worry about extra training at this point. Get settled first, start working and later you can upgrade. Your current quals are fairly competitive.

5) You can contact any of the better schools via e-mail to initiate an application and get more info from them. Then they may offer you an interview either online, by phone or when you arrive. Most schools though will want to interview you upon arrival before offering you a position.

You can find info about the reputation of most schools on this or other forums. Just search for the name.

Basically there is a ton of info about teaching abroad on the internet.

As for the application process, just send your resume (often referred to as a CV in Thailand) with a cover letter to begin with to see if they have any interest. A scan of your passport proves your nationality. In general, your SSN is not asked for. Some schools do want a CBC (Criminal Background Check). Scans of degrees and letters of reference can be included, but again maybe wait for their response first. Basically they will tell you all you need to know.

Anyway, obviously you are doing your research, which is great. Take your time and don't rush into anything and you should be fine.
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tttompatz



Joined: 06 Mar 2010
Posts: 1951
Location: Talibon, Bohol, Philippines

PostPosted: Tue Feb 07, 2012 7:35 am    Post subject: Re: Finishing up my Thailand homework Reply with quote

Lack wrote:
I think I'm about ready to apply for something in Thailand. I think I'm finally frustrated enough to actually do it now, and I need a change. I've been reading on ESL and Thailand for months. Now I'm just trying to tie up loose ends because I hate to go for something significant or important and fail to see something I should have known about. And that's what this thread is for. (And maybe it will be sticky worthy and help lots of people too besides myself.)

Ok, so...let me break this into categories:

1. Money. I primarily want to do ESL because I can't find a teaching job in the U.S. because that market is atrocious here.
I have a B.S. in Education/English, and work as a camp counselor, having experience educating kids informally. And I'm a U.S. citizen, obviously a native speaker of English. So from pretty much everything I have read, I will have no problem simply finding a job in Thailand. But I want a little more than bottom of the barrel; at the same time, I'm not expecting the best. Decent will do. My main question here is how much baht per year can I top out at with my current resume? I know this will depend somewhat based on if I worked rurally or in the city.

As far as money issues starting out, I have that base covered. I have $10,000 savings, so getting set up will not be a problem. I want my employer to at least pay for my plane ticket there.

2. Climate. I live in a very hot and humid place, and have all my life, so I'm used to it. I've read plenty about people complaining that they have to wear a suit and tie teaching. Is this true? Do most schools in the LOS require that dress code? I think I could still do it, but that sounds unreasonable.

3. Location. I'm a rural kind of guy. I hate driving, even in the USA. I will never, ever get behind the wheel in another country. Even if money was not an issue. I would much prefer walking. Public Transit is fine. I think I would like trying to live in a large city, but if anyone has an opinion on whether rural or urban is better, my ears are wide open! Also, I want to have plenty to do also. For those who have taught in the LOS, what location(s) do you recommend teaching in?

4. Preparation for teaching. I trained to be a teacher in college, although not in ESL. I am already thinking up ideas for teaching ESL, collecting ideas and resources. I don't want to take a course unless I need to. I am aware that there are some programs in which applicants take an ESL course in their destination country and then teach afterward. If it did not cost a lot, I would be fine with this. Does anyone recommend that route? (And does anyone know of ones that are legit. I'm wary, of course, for what seems like paying for a job, even if it looks like I am paying for a course instead.)

5. The Application process and interviewing and accepting a job, etc.
I have read lots of times that the better jobs are found with boots on the ground. I plan to just apply online. Plane tickets to Asia are very expensive. I'm okay with entry level, but I just want to avoid struggling to make ends meet! So a little play money with a little to save is what I need at minimum. So how much will it hurt to apply/accept online instead of real life?

The second part of this is, how much info should I give to prospective employers? I've looked at lots of job postings for ESl jobs online and tons of them look suspect. I disregard any job listing with gratuitous errors, emoticons, etc. Applying for a job typically requires a social security number at some point, but obviously I'm not going to do that. What about the prospective employer asking for a copy of passport? (I'm getting mine soon, don't have it yet. Not sure exactly what all personal info is on one.) The online aspect plus not personally knowing employers schools makes me nervous giving out even a little contact info. And I realize this is why people tend to suggest going in person, so that one can actually see the employer, workers, and school, and area. I'm really just looking for general tips here.

I have to go right now, but I will add anything later if I forgot. Sorry if anything I posted sounded obtuse, and let me say thanks already for how helpful this board and the posters here tend to be.


1) Look at EP, MEP, international and bilingual schools. EFL is NOT where you want to go (less money, more crap and no benefits). You should be able to find starting jobs in the 50-60k thb range and move up in your 2nd year to either a better salary or a better employer (or both).

NO employer outside of the top level international schools will pay for your plane ticket to Thailand. If you want airfare then you better look at Korea or China.

2) shirt and tie are the common dress code for male teachers (except at dodgy language academies where just about anything goes). You will only need a suit for "special" occasions. I have worn mine twice in the last two years. I wear my cap 'n gown more often than my jacket.

3) Find a job close to but not necessarily in BKK. The city is in easy reach for finding those "comfort things" at the foreign markets and the bright lights for those times when you wan more than the local videoke bar.

You'll have the convenience of the city and the lower expense and cleaner air of the country (I live 90km west of the city).

Public transportation isn't like home but driving isn't really needed either.

4) if you want to teach ESL then do something (it is a bit different than teaching other subjects). If you want to teach subjects (what you were trained to teach) then it won't matter or be necessary.

5) get a 60-day tourist visa and a plane ticket. Land here in Late April and the chances of landing a job within 30 days are 100%. The chances of getting a job @40k THB within 30 days are 90%. The chances of landing a job at 50k thb within 30 days are about 80%. Higher paid jobs will fall off to close to "0" after that until you have made some connections or done a year here and proven yourself.

The only stuff you will find off the net who will give you the time of day while you are still abroad are places I wouldn't want to work at.

.
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Lack



Joined: 10 Aug 2011
Posts: 98

PostPosted: Wed Feb 08, 2012 6:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks Sigmoid and Ttompatz -

Sounds like I would have it fairly easy. And if I stand to make a lot more per month if I go in person, then I must do that.

Sigmoid, you mentioned universities, primary/secondary schools, and international schools. Which kind of school do you personally recommend?

Ttompatz, sounds very easy if I fly over. And if very few employers would pay my airfare, then I guess I need to do that. What do you think about supporting oneself in Thailand by giving private lessons? I could do that before I landed a job, and even after I got one, just to supplement my income as I desired. If I was working for a school that is actually a business, obviously I can't teach my students there with private lessons I get paid for. Is there any problem if I gave private lessons to students if I worked at a public school or something like that?
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tttompatz



Joined: 06 Mar 2010
Posts: 1951
Location: Talibon, Bohol, Philippines

PostPosted: Wed Feb 08, 2012 7:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Lack wrote:
Ttompatz, sounds very easy if I fly over. And if very few employers would pay my airfare, then I guess I need to do that. What do you think about supporting oneself in Thailand by giving private lessons? I could do that before I landed a job, and even after I got one, just to supplement my income as I desired. If I was working for a school that is actually a business, obviously I can't teach my students there with private lessons I get paid for. Is there any problem if I gave private lessons to students if I worked at a public school or something like that?


Supporting oneself by doing "private lessons" may be possible AFTER you get settled and become known. It WON'T happen right off the plane and it is also illegal so advertising is not a great idea.

If you are here in mid April-mid May you will literally have your pick of jobs.
(more than you can imagine in the 30-40k THB range, fewer but still a nice number of choices in the 40-50k thb range and a few in the 50-60k thb range.

Giving tutorial classes after school (and often on school premises) is fairly common among Thai and foreign staff. It can make a great supplement to your income (sometimes even getting close to your regular income).

.
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MaiPenRai



Joined: 17 Jan 2006
Posts: 380
Location: BKK

PostPosted: Wed Feb 08, 2012 8:29 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Mostly good advice here but a few things need to mentioned or added.

1. With no relevant and current classroom experience, even with a B.Ed you may not walk into the better jobs here. I would hope for 45-60,000 baht/month, but be prepared to make a low as 40,000 baht/month.

As you mentioned, you should be able to supplement this with after school/weekend tutoring, but it takes time to build up a reliable clientele. You could also just take a job at a weekend language school to make 10-20,000 baht/month. You should hope for 500+ baht/hour, but again you may have take 350-500 baht/hour.

Once you get a year or 2 of relevant and current classroom experience AND a make a few contacts, MANY more doors will open up for you.

2.
Quote:
2) You don't have to wear a suit and probably not a tie. You should wear a tie for interviews though. If you have to wear a tie, just leave it in your office and put it on upon arrival.


A suit jacket may be necessary if you choose to do business English at a company. Also they may be required by better schools for school functions and ceremonies. Plenty of good inexpensive tailors here so no worries there.

Please, Please, PLEASE, don't be the guy that shows up to work in running shoes and no tie and then changes into "work clothes" once you are in the office. Whether we like it or not, as teachers we are in the public eye (like doctors, lawyers, etc.) and we are expected to behave and dress a certain way. Thailand is very conservative in the views of what teachers should be like. You should always dress for the job you want AND you should always remember that when teaching in a foreign country (especially EFL), EVERYONE is a prospective client. Dress well, smile, be outgoing, etc. and you will find that you will get lots of offers for work on the side.

3. Most of the better paying jobs are in the Bangkok Metro. That means within an hour or so of downtown Bangkok. Areas like this include Nonthaburi, Thonburi, Nakhon Pathom, Samut Prakan, Rangsit, Minburi, Bang Na. These are all outside the hustle and bustle of the city center, but close enough for an evening or weekend in the city. You can usually get much cheaper accommodation in these types of areas as well.

Other areas worth looking at are

Chiang Mai/Chiang Rai - usually lower salaries due to competition but there are a couple of mid range international schools in the area that Ive heard good things about.

Chonburi/Pattaya/Rayong area - Pattaya has a certain reputation (google). There are some bilingual/private/international schools in the area that pay decent.

Phuket - wouldnt live there to save my life, but there are some opportunities at some private/international schools there. Many have poor reputations as there is an unlimited supply of 'teachers' who think they want to teach by the beach.

Quote:
4) I wouldn't worry about extra training at this point. Get settled first, start working and later you can upgrade. Your current quals are fairly competitive


YEP, and if you do decide to take a course, one of the only worthwhile and recognized nearly worldwide is the CELTA. Don't bother with the course/job placement deal unless you want to have a provincial experience in Thailand for a semester.

Get practical experience and then a course will make more sense anyways.

5.
Quote:
Land here in Late April and the chances of landing a job within 30 days are 100%. The chances of getting a job @40k THB within 30 days are 90%. The chances of landing a job at 50k thb within 30 days are about 80%.


As you have a little nest egg, I would suggest coming a little earlier. Many of the better jobs will have hired already by late April. The Thai school year begins in late April or beginning of May.

Quote:
5) You can contact any of the better schools via e-mail to initiate an application and get more info from them. Then they may offer you an interview either online, by phone or when you arrive. Most schools though will want to interview you upon arrival before offering you a position.


YES, don't just show up, unless its a government Thai school.

Quote:
The only stuff you will find off the net who will give you the time of day while you are still abroad are places I wouldn't want to work at.


There are great jobs online. Yes, most are low end jobs, but I can think of at least 3 or 4 mid-range schools off the top of my head that look to hire online and overseas first, but will then move to looking locally if they dont find anybody they like. Top schools hire predominantly at job fairs around the world . These jobs require relevant and current experience that the OP doesnt have.

Please bring the following regardless of what ANYBODY on here tells you.
The Ministry of Education and Labor can be pains and the rules can change at the drop of a hat here.

1. Original degree(s), Cert(s), etc. (see if your Uni will do you a duplicate copy for a rice if you are worried about he originals). It's a pain, but I have personally seen good teachers denied work permits because they couldnt supply the official at the Ministry with an original degree.

2. Sealed and/or stamped official transcripts from Univeristy. Get a couple copies

3. A CBC is never a bad idea and the better schools will want a recent one. See if you can get a couple copies.

4. A letter of graduation confirmation from Uni. Often a requirement due to degrees being faked. Should be easy to get this.

5. Letters of recommendation and work experience. (with current contact info)

6. Bank, insurance, medical, etc info and documents.

Scan all of this but no need to give it all to prospective employers at one go. Most good schools will want to see these documents at an interview. A current CV (resume) is obvious.

If you are worried about sending certain documents via email, then just black out info that may be damaging and scan. So black out your actual passport number so it cant be used for anything else.

Quote:
Ttompatz, sounds very easy if I fly over


Yes, but dont expect a lack of competition here. Having no experience in the classroom will be a big hurdle to jump over to get your first good job. Salaries are staying stagnant or going down at many schools so the numbers for salaries you are hearing here are a little inflated IMHO.

PM me if you want a few names of schools that are in your wheelhouse. I can think of about 6-10 just off the top of my head.

Best of luck!
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plumpy nut



Joined: 12 Mar 2011
Posts: 791

PostPosted: Wed Feb 08, 2012 11:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

You should easily be able to get a job at an international school in the north in the Chiang Mai, Chiang Rai, Lampang region. Bangkok is in fact a hot sweaty polluted atrocious city and I would recommend it for visiting only. Chiang Mai is a bit of a resort town that has a pleasant size to it. Chiang Rai and Lampang are pretty nice cities by themselves and are close to Chiang Mai. That whole area is very pretty and picturesque as you will see when you come to Thailand. As far as getting your way paid, I think you can forget about that. A Thai school is not going to pay your way to come to Thailand, there's too many other people that are already here that they can hire and fire as they please. Anther thing, Chiang Mai, and the other small cities can be traveled by motorbike; Bangkok not.
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MaiPenRai



Joined: 17 Jan 2006
Posts: 380
Location: BKK

PostPosted: Thu Feb 09, 2012 1:17 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
You should easily be able to get a job at an international school in the north in the Chiang Mai, Chiang Rai, Lampang region.


Sorry but the OP has NO experience in the classroom at all. To say he will easily or 80% get a job at an international school in Thailand is misleading. There are more than a few B.Ed teachers in Thailand (most with experience) who will be looking for work this new school year. There will be competition. If this guy/girl is young, looks smart and is a good interview, he will have a check in his column to counteract having no experience. BUT there is no guarantee that the OP will walk into an international school anywhere. There is a good chance he will have to take a job at an EP or a private/catholic school for a year before he can make the step to mid tier internationals.


Agree that the north is a nice area of Thailand, but it is well known that because of this, there is a lot of competition for jobs and salaries are lower than other areas. If I could make even close to what I make in Bangkok up in the north, I would do it.

Quote:
Chiang Rai and Lampang are pretty nice cities by themselves and are close to Chiang Mai.


Chiang Rai is about 300 km from Chiang Mai. About 5 hours by bus. Might be able to drive yourself in less time though. Don't think there are flights connecting the 2 cities. Lampang is a nice little city, but I don't think there are too many opportunities to make good money there.
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sigmoid



Joined: 21 Jan 2003
Posts: 1002

PostPosted: Thu Feb 09, 2012 2:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Sigmoid, you mentioned universities, primary/secondary schools, and international schools. Which kind of school do you personally recommend?


It all depends on if you are comfortable teaching kids/teens and want to work hard and teach a lot, but also make more money (in general) then you probably want to teach in the EP, MEP, international and bilingual schools mentioned by Tom. International schools (if they are real) have high salaries and good benefits. Obviously, there is a lot of competition for these positions and just a bachelor's may not be enough.

University jobs are mostly for slackers who don't mind making less money (in general) in exchange for teaching fewer hours, not having to deal with discipline issues, having very few duties and working on a campus mostly full of young women. Working at a uni can also mean opportunities to teach evening and weekend courses if you're keen to make extra cash.

By the way, I hope you went through this thread:

How stressful is teaching ESL in Thailand?
http://forums.eslcafe.com/job/viewtopic.php?t=88577
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Lack



Joined: 10 Aug 2011
Posts: 98

PostPosted: Fri Feb 10, 2012 4:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

If it's going to be difficult to land a job at an International school, then I would rather go with something easier to get. And then I could gain the experience that will allow me to get such a job. I'm ok with paying my dues. But that's just one of several teaching options. As long as I can find work, it's fine. Main thing is ease of finding a job. But if I can't find work at an International school, I may just try to set something up before I leave. Going first makes me more nervous anyway.
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bule_boy69



Joined: 05 Mar 2007
Posts: 119
Location: Jakarta

PostPosted: Mon Feb 13, 2012 6:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

MaiPenRai wrote:

Please bring the following regardless of what ANYBODY on here tells you.
The Ministry of Education and Labor can be pains and the rules can change at the drop of a hat here.

1. Original degree(s), Cert(s), etc. (see if your Uni will do you a duplicate copy for a rice if you are worried about he originals). It's a pain, but I have personally seen good teachers denied work permits because they couldnt supply the official at the Ministry with an original degree.

2. Sealed and/or stamped official transcripts from Univeristy. Get a couple copies

3. A CBC is never a bad idea and the better schools will want a recent one. See if you can get a couple copies.

4. A letter of graduation confirmation from Uni. Often a requirement due to degrees being faked. Should be easy to get this.

5. Letters of recommendation and work experience. (with current contact info)

6. Bank, insurance, medical, etc info and documents.

Scan all of this but no need to give it all to prospective employers at one go. Most good schools will want to see these documents at an interview. A current CV (resume) is obvious.



A recent ad for Bell mentioned the need for a letter of attestation from a primary or secondary school. And I got the impression that this was not so much a school requirement, but rather a visa thing/ or thai teacher council licence requiement.

Can someone offer any info on this?

thanks
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tttompatz



Joined: 06 Mar 2010
Posts: 1951
Location: Talibon, Bohol, Philippines

PostPosted: Mon Feb 13, 2012 11:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

bule_boy69 wrote:
A recent ad for Bell mentioned the need for a letter of attestation from a primary or secondary school. And I got the impression that this was not so much a school requirement, but rather a visa thing/ or thai teacher council license requirement.

Can someone offer any info on this?

thanks


ASSUMING you are talking about native speakers with a degree this is not for immigration and not needed for the TCT (not needed for the waiver and not needed if you are going to take the 4 license tests.)

Must be for the employer.

.
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bule_boy69



Joined: 05 Mar 2007
Posts: 119
Location: Jakarta

PostPosted: Tue Feb 14, 2012 2:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

tttompatz wrote:
bule_boy69 wrote:
A recent ad for Bell mentioned the need for a letter of attestation from a primary or secondary school. And I got the impression that this was not so much a school requirement, but rather a visa thing/ or thai teacher council license requirement.

Can someone offer any info on this?

thanks


ASSUMING you are talking about native speakers with a degree this is not for immigration and not needed for the TCT (not needed for the waiver and not needed if you are going to take the 4 license tests.)

Must be for the employer.
.



Correct. Native speakers with a PGCE or equivalent. Actually, I had an interview for them, but it was a while back now, and can't remember clearly. i think they said was that it was for the TCT and not the school.

If this is not the case, then I am happy to hear that

i didn't get the job, and since then have been a bit concerned about this when considering my options in Thailand. I have a high school teaching qual, but not sure if I can get hold of such a letter.

Thanks.
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MaiPenRai



Joined: 17 Jan 2006
Posts: 380
Location: BKK

PostPosted: Tue Feb 14, 2012 9:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Its too confusing to get into all the details and I dont know if I am 100% on the following but my understanding is that,

In Thailand, ALL teachers at K-12 schools are required to have a THAI teaching license. If you have a license or a B.Ed or PGCE/Grad Dip Ed from your home country, they will usually honor that and you can apply to get the Thai license. You need to be currently employed by a Thai K-12 school for at least 1 year to get this. You are also supposed to have the Thai Culture Course (this is another thread in and of itself).

NOW, schools can apply for a waiver for up to 2 years which gets around these requirements for most foreign 'teachers' in Thailand. In the past, schools have been able to extend this waiver again and again. But they (TCT or Min of Ed??)seem to be getting tougher on this now. Also, my understanding is that the law states that each teacher is only allowed 1 two year waiver. This may not actually be enforced though. If this was actually enforced, it would be very difficult for schools to get work permits for a lot of teachers. Perhaps it is a way to get teachers to finish contracts?? This tends to be more enforced at ISAT schools.

ALSO, my understanding is that IF the teacher/school can prove that the teacher is working towards getting certified (B.Ed, GradDipEd or the insane 4 tests in Thailand), then they can get an extension of the waiver. This may have changed recently??

SO, the requirement to have a letter verifying at least 1 year of experience at a K-12 school may help the school in acquiring a Thai license OR it may just be a requirement for the school.

It should be easy to get. Just call up/email your old boss/school and ask them to write up a quick letter stating the dates you worked at the school. Sign and deliver. Obviously it should be on school letterhead.

Hope that clears it up. LOL!
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