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Asia vs Europe

 
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Prometheus12



Joined: 05 Mar 2012
Posts: 9
Location: Korea

PostPosted: Thu Mar 22, 2012 1:20 am    Post subject: Asia vs Europe Reply with quote

Good day,

I trust you well, as you may or may not have noticed this is only my second post so be kind Smile. I know the rep you guys have for being brutal, but hey I want the info so yeah.

I'm currently teaching in Asia and I know that's a total different ball game from Europe so I'm not expecting it to carry a lot of weight.

I'm not an EU citizen so I know that counts against me and I don't have a masters degree or education degree so I doubt I will be on the top of the interview list.

The question I have for you is what is some short term courses I can do that will help me land a job? I.E tefl vs celta vs something else

I'm interested in the following countries Czech Republic, Poland, Netherlands and Russia.

Now my goal is not exactly to save a lot of money I just want a working holiday where I don't touch my savings.

I studied German at school and I'm planning to become fluent in German as well as Dutch during my down time at work.
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spiral78



Joined: 05 Apr 2004
Posts: 9603
Location: On a Short Leash

PostPosted: Thu Mar 22, 2012 2:07 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

OK. Netherlands you have no chance in whatsoever regardless of certification, as a US citizen. No employer will get you a work visa without some serious qualifications and local contacts in which a teacher can get in on a very exceptional work visa as a specialist with skills/quals that no EU citizen can match. Seriously.

The Czech Rep and Poland you CAN get a work visa for, though it's a hassle for both you and an employer.

To compete in this region you will need a CELTA or equivalent: 120 hours on site and including supervised teaching practice with real students (not peer trainees). There are generic certs that meet the standard - if you go for a generic, you need to highlight the on-site and teaching practice elements clearly on your CV. It's necessary to have this because most newbies on this job market do, and anything less in combination with the fact that you're not an EU citizen will put you at a serious disadvantage.

Consider taking a cert course in the city where you want to start working. Jobs in this region aren't found from abroad anyway (there are simply too many teachers walking around looking for work in person here for a reputable school to need to take chances on anyone sight-unseen). A local training centre can be a great bridge into the country - your practice teaching students will be really representative of those you'll work with when you start, the centres usually help with logistics like airport pickup and housing during the course, along with local orientation, and your fellow trainees can form you first social contacts.

Keep in mind that you have just 90 days from landing in the Schengen zone (google if you're not familiar with the Golden 90 Day Rule already!) to get papers filed for a work visa. Most contracts are Sept/Oct through June, so ideally plan to take a course in August and start job hunting right after.

Also keep in mind start-up costs: in this region employers don't pay airfare and you will be facing rent/deposits/living costs up front as well.

Russia is somewhat different; you might want to post on the Russia board for specific info.

If you really want details on the situation in the Netherlands, you can send me a pm (once you have 5 posts) and I'll explain better - but it's a bit tedious and perhaps not necessary.
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Prometheus12



Joined: 05 Mar 2012
Posts: 9
Location: Korea

PostPosted: Thu Mar 22, 2012 2:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks Spiral78

I will post in the Russia forum to get up my post count. I'm not an American, but I thought maybe If I could show employers I'm fluent in Dutch it would be a plus point?

I will set a certain amount of money aside for start up costs, I know you need to go to Europe personally to stand any chance of a job (other than Georgia which is on my list of working holidays), I saw a TEFLprague program on another forum and would most have likely gone for that one in hopes of some assistance in finding employment, but I read a CELTA carries more weight.

I just figured employers will be more receptive to me if I can converse in their mother tongue (dutch is a lot easier to learn).

Thanks again Spiral I know you need to hit the streets when you want to work in Europe (I'm actually open to a lot of places, but I'm not sure which ones are easier to get work in), but like I said I want to do as much as I can while sitting at work twiddling my thumbs to make the streets more open to me Smile


Last edited by Prometheus12 on Thu Mar 22, 2012 3:51 am; edited 1 time in total
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spiral78



Joined: 05 Apr 2004
Posts: 9603
Location: On a Short Leash

PostPosted: Thu Mar 22, 2012 3:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Having some Dutch won't help - it's all about the passport. Again, if you want details I'll give them to you (I have worked in the Netherlands for nearly 7 years), but seriously if you are not an EU member citizen, short of marrying a Dutch national and/or having major credentials, there is no school that will give you a second glance (or visa assistance).

Honestly, it won't matter much about the local language for this region (Germany excepted). Most entry level teachers come in with basically zero local language. It's when you've been around a while and want to move up to the few better jobs around that you would need language skills.
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