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Visas and Sponsorship
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landcruzer



Joined: 15 Apr 2012
Posts: 26

PostPosted: Fri May 04, 2012 12:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Protecting human rights in Qatar
The National Committee for Human Rights, as stated by the decree of its planning, aims to promote and protect human rights and freedom. The main features of it are:

• To suggest ways to achieve the objectives with the international treaties and conventions.

• To look into human rights violations and work to resolve them.

• To monitor the situation of human rights in the state and raise it to the Council of Ministers.

This talk is good, but when we continue to read the competencies of the Committee we are surprised by the provision of text which states that : “Monitor what may arise from the human rights situation in the state and coordinate with the concerned authorities to respond.” The irony in this is that there is monitoring to respond and not to investigate and save the people from repression. It is, therefore, not surprising that the head of the National Commission for Human Rights at every occasion, formal and informal, will confirm that there is no policy which violates human rights in Qatar. What this statement does not say is that he and all members of the committee are staff of the Qatari government.

We see that the committee in its current work focuses only on the situation of “stateless” in the State and the rights of children of married female citizens from non-citizens. The committee, as it says in its reports, puts pressure on the government to change some laws by providing recommendations especially that concern the law of sponsorship, which, as they say in the committee, is better than the former, as the committee submitted a recommendation to the concerned authorities on the abolition of exit permit by the sponsor. They also say in their reports that we hope to take action on this part and the right of the Palestinian people to return and clearly define the meaning of terrorism. In the State of Qatar, there is no problem of stateless which is found in Kuwait, but we have the problem of Qatar’s population which is significantly different from the problem of stateless. The Emir H H Sheikh Hamad bin Khalifa Al Thani, since then he was the crown prince, solved their many problems and gave them equal rights in one way or another with the citizens. With regard to the rights of children of married female citizens from non-citizens, His Highness the Emir issued Emiri decision and the exceptions and worked on their equality with the citizens in rights and duties except the citizenship, because the children, as is the case in most of the countries of the world, follow the father’s nationality. With regard to the Committee’s pressure on the government in relation to the sponsorship and cancellation of exit permit by the sponsor, it does not come under the competencies of the committee, but it comes under the guidance of the United Nations and the ILO. The problem is that what is done by the State itself they say that it is the accomplishment of the committee. We fear for the members of the committee of Allah’s warning when he said in the Qura’n “Think not that those who exult in what they have brought about, and love to be praised for what they have not done,- think escape the penalty. For them is a penalty Grievous indeed.” [Aal ‘Imraan: 188 The Committee did not protect the human rights and freedoms particularly of the the Qatari citizen. The Qatari citizen is not protected by the authority of the government:

• He is forced to retire in the prime of his youth for no apparent reason and replaced in the same previous with non-nationals (the proportion of citizens in the total employment is not more than five percent).

• His property is confiscated and approved by Sharia and the Constitution with an excuse that it is out of the limits” and here it is intended that it is out of the city and not the State.”

• The law to protect the society is applied to him in light of what is called as the state of law and institutions while such a law in other countries is called as emergency law.

• He is prevented from exercising certain business and service activities because it is government’s monopoly and an individual cannot compete with the government.

• The prices of commodities and services for him are raised by the government because the government agreed to its companies to raise their prices for the citizens and residents and it has become the right of traders too to raise their prices to keep up with the government.

• The prices of goods and services for the citizens are raised again, because the government raised the fees and irregularities and identified the places of activities and staff accommodation which raised the expenses of the companies and thus raised the prices.

• The percentage of poverty and the poor people has increased in the state and the funds of state and associations, which are known as charity, go outside the border and the poor citizen who lives in this land is deprived of pearl diving days.

These models of the suffering of the citizens and the loss of their rights, even if we wanted to continue, we will find wonder of wonders and in the last the committee shall monitor what may arise from the human rights situation in the state and coordinate with the concerned authorities to respond. But the real problem is the work of the committee that stands with the non-citizen with the name of “National Committee for Human Rights” and it means that it is a National Committee before a human one.
The global committees for human rights stand in the row of human against the violations to which a short-sighted citizen can be exposed to in the government agencies. We in Qatar thank Allah for that, as He gave us an Emir who always stands with the people and unites their ranks. This is what we want to see in the work of government and in the approach of National Committee for Human Rights.

THE PENINSULA


http://www.thepeninsulaqatar.com/dr.-muhammad-al-kubaisi/173453-protecting-human-rights-in-qatar.html
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blastermill



Joined: 30 Aug 2011
Posts: 101

PostPosted: Mon Jul 02, 2012 10:10 am    Post subject: Timeframe to scrap sponsorship Reply with quote

Set timeframe to scrap sponsorship rule: HRW Wednesday, 13 June 2012

DOHA: A leading global human rights watchdog has urged Qatar to specify a timeframe by which it hopes to remove the sponsorship and exit permit rules for expatriate workers.New York-based Human Rights Watch (HRW) said yesterday it met with senior government officials on Monday and urged them to specify a deadline to do away with the sponsorship system.
“The general promise (by Qatar to remove the sponsorship and exit permit rules) means little unless they specify a deadline,” Sarah Whitson, HRW Middle East Director, told this newspaper yesterday.Earlier in the day, talking of the need to improve labour rights in Qatar, she told a news conference that the Qatari government has shown willingness to work with them on the issue, but has not made any commitments so far.“The Qatari government is very open. They have expressed their wishes to work with Human Right Watch…but they have not made any commitments and said they need more time,” Whitson told reporters. She also said that Qatari authorities had no objection to their press briefing being held here. “We informed the government that we wish to hold a press conference and they said yes,” Whitson later told The Peninsula.Asked if she also raised the issue of exit permit (an employer’s formal permission for a foreign worker to travel overseas) with government officials, Whitson said the exit permit regime is part of sponsorship rules.At yesterday’s press meet, HRW released a 146-page report on Qatar titled ‘Building a Better World Cup: Protecting Migrant Workers in Qatar Ahead of Fifa 2022’.

Present with Whitson were Priyanka Motaparthy, a representative of the MENA (Middle East and North Africa) division of HRW, and Nicholas McGeehan, director of Mafiwasta, an organization for workers’ rights in the UAE.Answering questions, Whitson said Qatar and Fifa have no option other than improving labour rights situation in Qatar to global standards.
The report is based on interviews with several migrant construction workers, as well as meetings and correspondence with government officials, employers, contracting companies, manpower agencies, diplomats from labour-exporting countries and worker rights’ activists, HRW said.According to the report, the problems migrant workers face include ‘exorbitant recruitment fees, which can take years to pay off, employers’ routine confiscation of worker passports and the restrictive sponsorship system that gives employers undue control over their workers.“Workers reported a range of problems, including unpaid wages, illegal salary deductions, crowded and unsanitary labor camps, and unsafe working conditions,” the report said.The report said that Qatar has one of the most restrictive sponsorship laws in the region, as workers cannot change jobs without their employer’s permission, regardless of whether they have worked two years or 20.And all workers must get their sponsoring employer to sign an ‘exit permit’ before they can leave the country. According to HRW, Saudi Arabia is the only other GCC country that has this system, while others have removed it.

Workers in the other GCC states can also change jobs after serving out their contracts or after working for two to three years with their first employer.The HRW has also taken objection to workers not being allowed to form unions or strike with its report saying that a recent government proposal for a worker union fails to meet minimum requirements for free association by restricting all decision-making positions to Qatari citizens.
Migrant workers comprise a staggering 94 percent of Qatar’s workforce, and the country has the highest ratio of migrants to nationals in the world.
The country may recruit up to a million additional construction workers over the next decade to build the stadiums and infrastructure
improvements Qatar promised in its bid to host the 2022 FIFA World Cup soccer event.The HRW said that as so many mega projects are to be launched for the 2022 event, Qatar and Fifa must ensure a risk-free environment for construction workers. Contracting companies and developers must respect labour rights and follow international norms, said the report.

The Peninsula


Last edited by blastermill on Mon Jul 02, 2012 10:13 am; edited 2 times in total
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blastermill



Joined: 30 Aug 2011
Posts: 101

PostPosted: Mon Jul 02, 2012 10:11 am    Post subject: Timeframe to scrap sponsorship Reply with quote

Set timeframe to scrap sponsorship rule: HRW Wednesday, 13 June 2012

DOHA: A leading global human rights watchdog has urged Qatar to specify a timeframe by which it hopes to remove the sponsorship and exit permit rules for expatriate workers.New York-based Human Rights Watch (HRW) said yesterday it met with senior government officials on Monday and urged them to specify a deadline to do away with the sponsorship system.
“The general promise (by Qatar to remove the sponsorship and exit permit rules) means little unless they specify a deadline,” Sarah Whitson, HRW Middle East Director, told this newspaper yesterday.

Earlier in the day, talking of the need to improve labour rights in Qatar, she told a news conference that the Qatari government has shown willingness to work with them on the issue, but has not made any commitments so far.“The Qatari government is very open. They have expressed their wishes to work with Human Right Watch…but they have not made any commitments and said they need more time,” Whitson told reporters. She also said that Qatari authorities had no objection to their press briefing being held here. “We informed the government that we wish to hold a press conference and they said yes,” Whitson later told The Peninsula.Asked if she also raised the issue of exit permit (an employer’s formal permission for a foreign worker to travel overseas) with government officials, Whitson said the exit permit regime is part of sponsorship rules.At yesterday’s press meet, HRW released a 146-page report on Qatar titled ‘Building a Better World Cup: Protecting Migrant Workers in Qatar Ahead of Fifa 2022’.

Present with Whitson were Priyanka Motaparthy, a representative of the MENA (Middle East and North Africa) division of HRW, and Nicholas McGeehan, director of Mafiwasta, an organization for workers’ rights in the UAE.Answering questions, Whitson said Qatar and Fifa have no option other than improving labour rights situation in Qatar to global standards.
The report is based on interviews with several migrant construction workers, as well as meetings and correspondence with government officials, employers, contracting companies, manpower agencies, diplomats from labour-exporting countries and worker rights’ activists, HRW said.According to the report, the problems migrant workers face include ‘exorbitant recruitment fees, which can take years to pay off, employers’ routine confiscation of worker passports and the restrictive sponsorship system that gives employers undue control over their workers.“Workers reported a range of problems, including unpaid wages, illegal salary deductions, crowded and unsanitary labor camps, and unsafe working conditions,” the report said.The report said that Qatar has one of the most restrictive sponsorship laws in the region, as workers cannot change jobs without their employer’s permission, regardless of whether they have worked two years or 20.And all workers must get their sponsoring employer to sign an ‘exit permit’ before they can leave the country. According to HRW, Saudi Arabia is the only other GCC country that has this system, while others have removed it.

Workers in the other GCC states can also change jobs after serving out their contracts or after working for two to three years with their first employer.The HRW has also taken objection to workers not being allowed to form unions or strike with its report saying that a recent government proposal for a worker union fails to meet minimum requirements for free association by restricting all decision-making positions to Qatari citizens.
Migrant workers comprise a staggering 94 percent of Qatar’s workforce, and the country has the highest ratio of migrants to nationals in the world.
The country may recruit up to a million additional construction workers over the next decade to build the stadiums and infrastructure improvements Qatar promised in its bid to host the 2022 FIFA World Cup soccer event.The HRW said that as so many mega projects are to be launched for the 2022 event, Qatar and Fifa must ensure a risk-free environment for construction workers. Contracting companies and developers must respect labour rights and follow international norms, said the report.
The Peninsula
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blastermill



Joined: 30 Aug 2011
Posts: 101

PostPosted: Fri Apr 05, 2013 2:57 pm    Post subject: NOC Reply with quote

Some people have had several transfers of sponsorship. I can think of one person who has bounced around from QF to QU and back to QF so it does happen. I myself have had two - it all depends on your job classification and how much you are needed.



://thepeninsulaqatar.com/law/229018-legal-corner-noc-is-valid-only-for-one-transfer.html

aw No. 4/2009, which governs the entry, exit, residence and sponsorship of expatriates, stipulates that the agency concerned at the Ministry of Interior requires written approval from both parties, besides approval from the Ministry of Labour, for transferring an employee’s sponsorship. Transfer of sponsorship results in the new sponsor bearing all obligations to the employee, and clears the former sponsor of all responsibilities.

This condition for transferring sponsorship should be adhered to by all parties. Therefore, the questioner should get a new NOC from his current employer to transfer his sponsorship.

The NOC is valid only for one transfer and cannot be used more than once, and it becomes void once used for transferring sponsorship, since the names of the current and new sponsors will be different the next time.

Nevertheless, the NOC can be used as evidence to show that the worker has a local contract. But there is no provision in law that obliges a sponsor to transfer the sponsorship of his employee if he has been recruited locally.

Article (12) of the law says the minister or his representative may provisionally transfer the sponsorship of an expatriate worker in case of claims between him and his sponsor.

The minister or his representative may also approve the transfer of sponsorship of an expatriate worker if it is proved that the current sponsor is abusive or if public interest requires it.
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