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Honda Wins - Japanese, Chinese or Indonesian?
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mark_in_saigon



Joined: 20 Sep 2009
Posts: 746

PostPosted: Sat Oct 13, 2012 9:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

With used motos, everyone just hands over the plastic card. This registration thing is for new motos only, someone please correct me if I am wrong, but I have been in on a few of these deals already, but not with new ones. I would say that for the average teacher, he will likely have more "relationships" not work out than he will buy and sell motorbikes. In other words, putting a rather expensive asset in someone elses name over here usually results in that asset ending up being in the sole possession and ownership of that (usually) ex relation. Ditto other expensive items and financial loans. Very rare for that stuff to come back to you.

I agree that the Craigslist ads for Wins represents a micro market of expats who made this trip and are essentially dumping their motorbikes. I think this means you can get a very good price on these machines, not every one, but if you plug away you will get one in good condition for $200 or so. HOWEVER, the long term cost and work and suitability is what really matters. We put so much time into (and on) these things, we can obsess about shaving a couple of hundred bucks off a purchase price when other factors are more important in the long run.
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mark_in_saigon



Joined: 20 Sep 2009
Posts: 746

PostPosted: Sat Oct 13, 2012 11:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bán xe Môtô 125 Honda lên xe cổ, 24tr; Môtô Minskhờ BS 29, xe tây chạy du lịch, làm mới, 7tr; Win 100, có đề, c̣n tốt, 3,5tr. Tel. 090336xxx

By the way, you have to look CLOSELY at these to get the picture. This ad has a Honda 125 at 24 million, but the Win is 3.5 million, $175 or so. Gotta have a VN help you navigate this stuff. These ads frequently have more than one moto listed, so it is goofy for us to try and decipher all of it. Oh, look, he has a Minsk in there too for $350! Those are awesome, would love to have one of those.
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Jbhughes



Joined: 01 Jul 2010
Posts: 254

PostPosted: Sun Oct 14, 2012 9:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm enjoying reading this bike stuff as much as anyone.

Quick bit where I can pitch in:

mark_in_saigon wrote:
With used motos, everyone just hands over the plastic card. This registration thing is for new motos only, someone please correct me if I am wrong,


In THEORY you are meant to get a new card and plates when you buy a 2nd hand bike off someone. This is the reason one can see bikes that are more than 2 years old, but have the new 5 digit registration. In practice though, I don't think many people bother and unless something particularly crazy happened, I don't really think anyone cares.

In theory you're actually meant to change your card and -if my memory serves me correctly- the plates as well if you move provinces. Again, how many people do this in practice and how often does one see Saigon plates in other provinces. I can double check this another time if anyone really cares about it. (I imagine this is even less important as a foreigner, and I can't imagine many VN bothering with it).

A relatively new law regarding bike ownership is that a contract between the buyer and seller has to be stamped at a local notary office, so anyone who really wants to bother getting an old bike transferred into their name, should check this.

My view - if it's just a few hundred dollars, don't bother - make sure you get the card and and that you keep it.

Further information - Mark's mentioned a few times about mechanics lying about the amount of increased displacement on bikes and that it would only be possible by replacing the bottom part of the machine. Doubtless he's right as he's got experience of all this, but on the point of it being illegal, it is actually possible to put a different engine into a bike and make it legal, but you'd have to get various certificates and stuff from the Department of Transport. Again, another process that exists on pieces of paper but out there on greasy pavements?? Somehow I seriously doubt it. So his advice is right in practice, I'm just making the point that it is actually possible to do legally.

Mark, you've said a few times about the manual clutch being better on the hills - what makes it better? I'm not very familiar with manual clutches whatsoever, so just wondered Smile
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mark_in_saigon



Joined: 20 Sep 2009
Posts: 746

PostPosted: Sun Oct 14, 2012 10:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Glad you are enjoying the bit about motos. Let me say first, we had a very good moto thread about a year ago, with a bunch of technical stuff on it, so anyone who is really wild about this stuff needs to read that one also. If I had some way of combining them, I would. Next time we get going on this subject again, I will try to just reply on whichever one seems to be the most comprehensive rather than spreading it all over.

Next, Rob and I BOTH had identical times to do our driver's licenses today, so we met there, went thru that and had coffee afterwards. Rob is a great guy, enjoyed meeting him and his lovely gf. The test itself was interesting, lots to know about that for anyone who wants to go thru it. I think if you do not have a motorbike license from your home country, you have to also take the written test in VN, which would make it very difficult. I am not certain of all this, but that is what my gf thinks. I think the important point on the deal is if you pay $70 to the admin when you first set it up, they take care of the red stamps and some other tedious bs, if you go cheapy cheapy, you have to jump thru hoops. I think Rob went thru the hoops, maybe he can clarify that part. They make the foreigners all come to this one location west of the airport, apparently they have someone who can speak English there, though I never saw him/her. We all seemed to have our own helpers/gf's/hanger ons. Looked like about 10 expats there and an untold number of VNEZs. They mostly had the foreigners do the thing first, the so called test. You just drive this little course, the hardest part is a figure 8 which is pretty narrow and somewhat tight, and you are supposed to stay between the lines. Almost no one stays completely between the lines the whole time. The rest of the course is easier, not worth describing, just follow the paint, pretty obvious what to do. One guy got turned around backwards on the 8, somehow he failed and immediately got some kind of special relief, he was allowed to try again and then passed. So anyway, the whole ordeal was over rather quickly for us, the natives may still be there. They just use a couple of their own bikes, you don't drive yours (or at this location at this time we did not). When I stopped, I saw mine had almost no front braking power. Nice. Theoretically, those of us with what used to be 50cc bikes do not need licenses, but I get the feeling that the cops are doing more stops, and I figured sooner or later I should have a license. After a couple of years of driving without one and seeing them start to pull me over and then pretend it was someone else they had in mind a couple of times, you start realizing that in this part of life in VN (at this time, anyway) we are being given DIVINE SLACK.

Now, my 50's get boosted, as noted everyone lies and says they are 100's, but that is bull. I put a 110 cylinder on a 50 AND bored it once, giving me perhaps 85 or so, and it was too much bore with not enough stroke, the compression was too high and drivability, low end and long term reliability were all compromised. It was a rocket though. So, I can just imagine taking an honest to god complete 110 from a Wave or smthing, boring that to 118 or so, and putting THAT on a 67 or a Cub. They are smaller and lighter, so the power to weight ratio would be really killer. So, if this is actually legal with the dept of invalids or whatever, I am all for it, and will be first in line to get my head examined. I will try to explore this more, thanks mucho for that tidbit of info. Yeah, I think the cops NEVER check the VIN, but the VN are always real goosey about this, like it is a big deal, so if I am gonna do this to a moto I have done all this other stuff to, I do not want to take a chance losing it over a bad VIN. BUT, if I can do it LEGALLY, time's a wastin ma.

On the manual clutch, my suggestion is, if you have never used one in the west, this IS NOT the place to learn. Like folks who have only driven an automatic and then try to learn a standard transmission car (pretty much the same deal by the way). So trying to learn when you are already an adult in a car that you really do not want to tear up (as opposed to a young kid with a jalopy) and learning in city traffic, I just think it is a mistake. The benefit of the manual is pretty small, and mostly it is the joy of shifting the gears of a performance vehicle, it is not so much the better actual performance IN THIS CRAZY ENVIRONMENT. Now yes, on a real honest to god incline, the manual is better, direct power to the ground, no slip. Going down the hills, you can also use your engine to slow you down, instead of your brakes. Plus, first gear is REALLY first gear, so you are not slipping the clutch (or whatever internal parts slip on these newer automatics, which are like constant variable transmissions), not tearing anything up and so you have direct control of how fast or slow you go up (or down) that incline based on throttle. So it is direct control, and it is also a mental thing, less buffer between you, the throttle, the engine and the road. Those of us who do not care about performance machines should not bother with it. Those of us who have driven performance machines (especially when we were young, and so got used to the excitement of it, and were comfortable with that kind of machine), are the candidates for a manual clutch. But even then, in heavy traffic in HN or HCMC, it is a pain in the butt, and you better have it just right, you do not want to deal with one that dies on you at traffic stops, that won't shift perfectly, and one that you are not sure what gear you are in when you stop.

Rightyo about IN THEORY. Yeah, almost everything we do here, we need to say

generally speaking

according to some interpretations of the actual law

some people say

I was told

it appears

the way it happened for me (but may not happen that way for you)

I try to constantly plug enough of those into my posts so people understand just because someone says it does not make it like the 10 commandments or something. It drives me batty how all this stuff can be enforced and interpreted and all, very hard to be certain about anything here.
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cb400



Joined: 27 Sep 2010
Posts: 168
Location: Hanoi

PostPosted: Mon Oct 15, 2012 7:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

For all the cub lovers here:

http://www.bikeexif.com/super-cub
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Jbhughes



Joined: 01 Jul 2010
Posts: 254

PostPosted: Mon Oct 15, 2012 7:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

mark_in_saigon wrote:
Glad you are enjoying the bit about motos. Let me say first, we had a very good moto thread about a year ago, with a bunch of technical stuff on it, so anyone who is really wild about this stuff needs to read that one also. If I had some way of combining them, I would. Next time we get going on this subject again, I will try to just reply on whichever one seems to be the most comprehensive rather than spreading it all over.

Yes, I enjoyed that thread, too, perhaps the powers that be an group everything together a bit.
mark_in_saigon wrote:
I think if you do not have a motorbike license from your home country, you have to also take the written test in VN, which would make it very difficult. I am not certain of all this, but that is what my gf thinks.

This is correct, I did this. It's (well, was) ạ 15 question multiple choice test based on 100 questions. I did it by remembering the answers to the questions. It freaked out the beige coloured shirts when they saw me in there, especially when I finished before some others! I read some internet newspaper article at the time that there was some plan to make an English-based version of the test, so that it would be easier for foreigners, no idea if this has happened or not.
mark_in_saigon wrote:
I think the important point on the deal is if you pay $70 to the admin when you first set it up, they take care of the red stamps and some other tedious bs, if you go cheapy cheapy, you have to jump thru hoops.

I'm under the impression that the process has changed slightly since when I did it (2009), because now I believe there are some compulsory lessons involved. My gf at the time handled the paperwork, it didn't seem too much hassle and unless she paid on my behalf in secret, we didn't pay any extra. One thing was waiting for test day, I'd imagine them green papers would help to avoid that.
mark_in_saigon wrote:
You just drive this little course, the hardest part is a figure 8 which is pretty narrow and somewhat tight, and you are supposed to stay between the lines. Almost no one stays completely between the lines the whole time. The rest of the course is easier, not worth describing, just follow the paint, pretty obvious what to do. One guy got turned around backwards on the 8, somehow he failed and immediately got some kind of special relief, he was allowed to try again and then passed.

I practised the figure 8 quite a bit before test day to be confident at doing it, I think it's worth finding one's local figure of 8 just to be sure you can do it.
mark_in_saigon wrote:
Theoretically, those of us with what used to be 50cc bikes do not need licenses, but I get the feeling that the cops are doing more stops, and I figured sooner or later I should have a license. After a couple of years of driving without one and seeing them start to pull me over and then pretend it was someone else they had in mind a couple of times, you start realizing that in this part of life in VN (at this time, anyway) we are being given DIVINE SLACK.

The under 50cc bit is interesting, there is also a 50cc scooter called a Candy, can't remember what make it is, but it might be worth considering for first timers, it looks quite small, though.
mark_in_saigon wrote:
So, I can just imagine taking an honest to god complete 110 from a Wave or smthing, boring that to 118 or so, and putting THAT on a 67 or a Cub. They are smaller and lighter, so the power to weight ratio would be really killer. So, if this is actually legal with the dept of invalids or whatever, I am all for it, and will be first in line to get my head examined.

I have this long term plan of getting a Chaly and putting a 110 from a Wave on there and doing the same thing. I reckon it would be like a rocket, but also quite nice as the parts are all still readily available.
mark_in_saigon wrote:
I will try to explore this more, thanks mucho for that tidbit of info. Yeah, I think the cops NEVER check the VIN, but the VN are always real goosey about this, like it is a big deal, so if I am gonna do this to a moto I have done all this other stuff to, I do not want to take a chance losing it over a bad VIN. BUT, if I can do it LEGALLY, time's a wastin ma.

Ok, here's the name of the legal document that I've been taking this info from:
VN: Số: 36/2010/TT-BCA THÔNG TƯ Quy định về đăng kư xe
English: No. 36/2010/TT-BCA CIRCULAR Regulations on vehicle registration

The English version that I've got is just from google translate I think, but it did an okay job. Using the Vietnamese one was necessary in parts though, so non-VN speakers might want to ask for a bit of help (well, it's probably best anyone getting a native speaker for help anyway!).

The key term in Vietnamese is 'xe cải tạo' which means something along the lines of 'refurbished vehicle'. If you search through the document, you will see that even a paint change can mean that you have to get the Registration card changed.

If you look at 3.3.6, it says there are 2 main cases that refer to what we would do: Using an engine from another bike and using a completely new engine made here. If you use an engine from another bike, you need to have a paper that says that the old bike has been taken out of registration. In the case that you use a new engine, it must have a factory quality inspection paper in accordance with the Ministry of Transport.

In addition you would need a paper from the Ministry of Transport assuring the safety and adherence to environmental laws of the refurbished bike.

All this sounds like a lot and I think a good read through the document, followed by a trip to the Ministry of Transport would be in order. I notice that they have various rules for older bikes as well, probably working more in your favour than less.

mark_in_saigon wrote:
On the manual clutch, my suggestion is, if you have never used one in the west, this IS NOT the place to learn. Like folks who have only driven an automatic and then try to learn a standard transmission car (pretty much the same deal by the way). So trying to learn when you are already an adult in a car that you really do not want to tear up (as opposed to a young kid with a jalopy) and learning in city traffic, I just think it is a mistake. The benefit of the manual is pretty small, and mostly it is the joy of shifting the gears of a performance vehicle, it is not so much the better actual performance IN THIS CRAZY ENVIRONMENT. Now yes, on a real honest to god incline, the manual is better, direct power to the ground, no slip. Going down the hills, you can also use your engine to slow you down, instead of your brakes. Plus, first gear is REALLY first gear, so you are not slipping the clutch (or whatever internal parts slip on these newer automatics, which are like constant variable transmissions), not tearing anything up and so you have direct control of how fast or slow you go up (or down) that incline based on throttle. So it is direct control, and it is also a mental thing, less buffer between you, the throttle, the engine and the road. Those of us who do not care about performance machines should not bother with it. Those of us who have driven performance machines (especially when we were young, and so got used to the excitement of it, and were comfortable with that kind of machine), are the candidates for a manual clutch. But even then, in heavy traffic in HN or HCMC, it is a pain in the butt, and you better have it just right, you do not want to deal with one that dies on you at traffic stops, that won't shift perfectly, and one that you are not sure what gear you are in when you stop.


Thanks for taking the time to answer on that one. With my bike I can't really see much of an opportunity to go manual as it is and I think with a future bike I can now weigh up how I would use it as to whether or not it's worth going for the manual.

mark_in_saigon wrote:
Rightyo about IN THEORY. Yeah, almost everything we do here, we need to say

generally speaking

according to some interpretations of the actual law

some people say

I was told

it appears

the way it happened for me (but may not happen that way for you)

I try to constantly plug enough of those into my posts so people understand just because someone says it does not make it like the 10 commandments or something. It drives me batty how all this stuff can be enforced and interpreted and all, very hard to be certain about anything here.


I'm pretty much the same and agree completely. What I do at least try to do is to be aware of what the laws are, partly for interest but also partly to try to understand each situation that I come to from a legal perspective. It's kind of like knowing the price of something and how it's influenced. The laws are just another influence. But it does work well when you meet someone who doesn't want to play ball and you show them that you know what the law is, then it's in their court to decide if they have some other law that negates it or they are prepared to pay off whomever it would be to get around it. The worst thing that our guys do is just say 'yes' to everything. It ruins it for everyone else. Anyway, that's another topic altogether!
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mark_in_saigon



Joined: 20 Sep 2009
Posts: 746

PostPosted: Mon Oct 15, 2012 2:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for linking that Cub. Yeah, I imagine driving THAT one would take someone even goofier than I. You would have to really be careful with that crazy thing. I would put it in my bedroom and use it as an aphrodisiac, I don't think I could actually bring myself to drive it. Gawd. Notice they actually put a manual clutch on it? Of course, for a high performance machine, it is a natural, but that is the only time I have ever seen where someone put a manual on a Cub. Can you imagine how much money these guys put into this thing? For me, one of the really great things about these old bikes is you can get something running really good for an amazingly low price, and the 67 can truly be a performance machine, a Cub, not really, though this one certainly is. But actually, it is not even a Cub anymore. It is like the old Funny Cars, they looked like Detroit iron, but they had almost nothing stock left on them. Anyway, with a 67, it does not have to cost you more than about 700 bucks to have a very nice and high performance classic Honda going. In the states, to have a high performance vehicle usually costs ten grand minimum, then the gas and all is crazy, and then you cannot really drive it anywhere, it is like a sacred hangar queen. These Hondas are so cheap to get running nicely (not like the linked one, which is insanely modified), you can afford to do this stuff and enjoy the feel of one of the finest machines ever built. I am not advocating driving like the hero boys, who are really stupid the way they drive, but on the rare occasions when you do have some clear road in front of you, it sure feels good to run one of these thru the gears, and of course that is where the manual transmission comes in, you become "part of the machine". Thanks for finding that link, I will try to copy those pictures of it. By the way, anyone who wants to get crazy with a Cub, you do not have to go as wild as these guys did, just get a decent one for about 350 bucks and get your cc's boosted to whatever we can get away with, about 118 would be realistic with a bored 110 I think. It will be plenty fast for all practical purposes. Paint it, put on new sprockets and a chain, 2 teeth bigger on the front sprocket than stock after you have modded an engine on these usually is about right. Upgrade the headlight, service the bearings and the brakes. Fix whatever else is wrong with yours, usually turn signals and brake lights need messing with. I noticed they did not get disk brakes on it, as crazy as they went I was expecting that, though I think the stock front fork on a Cub would never allow it, but they should be able to get them on the rear. You can do both on a 67 if you want to spend the bucks. 100 back and about 150 front, with a new front fork. Also of note, that appears to be a Little Cub, not a Super Cub. Almost the same, but a bit smaller and the style is a little different.
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mark_in_saigon



Joined: 20 Sep 2009
Posts: 746

PostPosted: Mon Oct 15, 2012 4:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi JB, thanks for your valuable input.

On my deal, no lessons AT ALL, and no test other than the driving test. But, we did go the expensive route, I think Rob said he needed a health check, maybe I misunderstood, but I think he did the normal route and so had to mess with more bs. My license from the U.S. included motos already, for whatever that was worth. On the figure 8, it was okay to try to do it, but there were so many folks already trying it was crazy, so doing it there the day of the test would likely require being VERY early. But the main thing was, they are not gonna fail the foreigners unless they do something stupid anyway. I think just keep up enough speed to not have to put your foot down, and don’t drive the wrong direction, everyone was passing with no problem. I mean, you see how these people drive, how strict do you think they are with the test? They should have some special test for how to shove your way to the front of a line for the parking area if they want it to be realistic.

Any 50 cc should be exempt from the need for a license, plus the electric ones do not require a license or a helmet. The Mobilette is 50 or less, and would be a true museum piece. There are still a few of those buzzing around.

Somehow the Chaly does not excite me, as tall as I am, it seems even crazier to have me on that than a Cub, but also, I do not like to be lower than everyone else. But I do notice that they are worth some bucks in the states, so they have their fans. Might as well be a Cub too, same drive train and technology, but smaller of course. I think they would be fine in some arenas, we used to have one that we took to the boat races. They can be fun off the street, but the streets are so crazy here, I would hate to add to the danger by being lower than everyone and not visible to traffic. I think you can control your wheelies with them pretty easily too, with less danger of bashing your noggin. I think the 110 on that would be extreme overkill, just not sure you could ever use that much power, unless you wanted to do it on a real street setting. Still, I guess overkill is kinda the point of all this anyway, so who am I to criticize? Reminds me of when my younger brother did all this work to get a small block Chevy in a Chevy Luv, which was a tiny import truck. Yeah, it would pull the front wheels off the ground, but it would also destroy drive trains and bend the frame and at some point he realized he had reached that magical point of: this is just too stupid. I almost reached that point on my 67 once, when I had maxed the piston size but did not alter the stroke, which these guys do not know how to do. So it would get airborne under the right conditions, a nice little incline and the right acceleration and shazaam, ground control, we have liftoff! But it was breaking things without the right balance, so I had to drop the ccs. Your info on having a legal donor engine has really excited me though, as this would be the next logical illogical step.

I would not suggest putting a manual on ANY bike that came with an auto, in fact, if I get a second 67, one will have an auto. Easier to swap to the auto than to the manual. I love the style and all, but every time I go in that stop and go traffic it is clear to me that the auto is far better. You know in the states, an auto on a motorcycle is rare, they all have manual clutches, unless you can find these small scooters, they are mostly autos. But we have autos for a reason over here, and it is what we are facing, 90% of the driving we do in HCMC an auto is better, only when we get out on 1A or something similar is a manual actually better, and even then, it is not a big deal, it just is more fun and no longer a pain in the butt.

I will be getting my gf on this issue of donor engines. That would be the true answer for us. She does think I am way too excited about modifying our bikes, but it is my money, so what the hey? Anyone get any further info on this, do tell. I do suggest when you ask about a Cub or 67 that claims to be 100, aggressively pursue with the seller how they achieved that. I email some of the sellers, as I would buy another one, they never come back saying that they actually know it is a 100, instead if they say anything, it is that they were just told it was, so they are selling it again as such. A real 100 on these older Cubs or 67’s is rare, and it will haul ass if you actually get one.
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robfir



Joined: 14 Apr 2012
Posts: 23
Location: Bournemouth, Dorset, England

PostPosted: Tue Oct 16, 2012 11:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi all Smile

Yeah, I used this method (I come under "Case 2"): http://sgtvt.hochiminhcity.gov.vn/web/tintuc/default.aspx?cat_id=592&news_id=4501

Which does involve a bit of running around. It's cheap though! The health check's no big deal: blood pressure, pulse, grip strength, height and weight, eyesight with one and both eyes... I think that was all.
The ladies working at 63 Ly Tu Trong who helped me apply and did my health check were very nice, it was only 130k VND I think - I interpret that as 70 for the application and 60 for the health check. I haven't been to 47 Le Duan for this because I already had notarized documents and my girlfriend's qualified to translate my licence. I've a full A4 page of mugshots at home so that sped things up too.

As Mark says the practical test is no biggy (we didn't have to do the written/theory).
I had a piece of paper stating the rules and telling me where to go and at what time (in Vietnamese). The link I've included in this post says the test site is 63 Ly Tu Trong, but it wasn't for me. (It was 71/3/38 Che Lan Vien - Tan Phu).

Anyway, chances are you've been doing a fair bit of driving here before you get around to doing the test - only the figure of 8 is worth consideration (it's a bit tight) but after a little practice people seem to pass without difficulty. When practicing I was struggling because it was so crowded, but when you take the test proper it's only you in the 8 so you can maintain a suitable speed and it's far easier.

We had to ride the centre's semi-autos. No brakes to speak of and I think they start you in third gear. I prefer 2nd gear for this course and managed to change to it before starting, no complaint from the assessors. Having little experience with semi-autos probably wouldn't matter too much, you don't need to leave 2nd gear for this - it is handy to know how to ensure you're in 2nd when you set off though.

If your name doesn't seem to be being called feel free to peek over the assessors' shoulders - they put our application forms on the table, photos visible, after trying to pronounce our names. Also catching a glimpse of your score while they're writing it down doesn't seem to upset anyone - they write two numbers: 100 (maximum score possible) on the left, your score on the right. 80 or above is a pass Smile

I was told to have my passport and home-country driving licence with me when I took the test, but only had to show my passport.
I'm told I can collect my licence from 63 Ly Tu Trong ten (working?) days after I took the test... Fingers crossed!

P.S. That Cub linked to previously is gorgeous!
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mark_in_saigon



Joined: 20 Sep 2009
Posts: 746

PostPosted: Tue Oct 16, 2012 12:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hey Rob, when you say no brakes to speak of, do you mean, you did not need brakes for the course, or the bike you drove had none? I did not really need them til I finished and tried to stop, the test bike had almost NO FRONT BRAKES! I was on that Dream they had. Can you imagine them testing you on a bike with no real brakes? What if you mowed down half the crowd, whose fault would that be? This stuff can be SO crazy.

We are supposed to have a driver's license, insurance for our bike (costs like 5 bucks or so, can get at any new motorbike dealer I think), and your plastic registration card when you drive. Lots of the VN do not have all this, or don't have it with them when they get stopped, so that is when they have to pay some bucks or have momma come bring the documents or whatever they do. I just think it will be nice to have all the documents, I would guess that with all the slack they give us that if we do get pulled over and do have all that, it should be enough unless we were really doing something crazy wrong.
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biliana



Joined: 19 Aug 2012
Posts: 53
Location: Vietnam

PostPosted: Wed Oct 17, 2012 1:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Insurance from the post office, just take your registration card.

70 or 80 thousand. I'm due to renew, I'll post later.

It's more like road tax than real insurance.
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TRH



Joined: 27 Oct 2011
Posts: 163
Location: HCMC

PostPosted: Wed Oct 17, 2012 4:35 am    Post subject: Converting your licence Reply with quote

mark_in_saigon wrote:
I think if you do not have a motorbike license from your home country, you have to also take the written test in VN, which would make it very difficult. I am not certain of all this, but that is what my gf thinks. I think the important point on the deal is if you pay $70 to the admin when you first set it up, they take care of the red stamps and some other tedious bs, if you go cheapy cheapy, you have to jump thru hoops.
If you DO have a motorbike license in your home country I would recommend this guy. http://vietnamdriverlicense.wordpress.com/ Scroll down the page for English. The business is called AN KHANG and the guy is named Nguyen Ngoc An. He speaks English well and is on Dien Bien Phu and also has offices in Hanoi, Hue, and Can Tho. I don't know about English at the other cities, but I bet he hires people with some English.

He is mostly set up for Viet Kieu to get a license sent to them so they have it as soon as they come home but you can deal with him on a walk-in basis. He charges $70 the same as Mark mentions but you have no testing at all. Just leave him photocopies of passport/visa and your home drivers license. Come back in a week with funds and get back your home license and new VN license. I thought I was paying a lot of money just for connections but if I understood Mark correctly about paying the same and still taking the driving test, maybe it was a good deal.

A few caveats: One, regardless if your home license is for all sizes of bike, the VN license will be for A1 so if you want something bigger than 175cc (A2) you will need to go the regular route. Second, my license also is for B1 and B2. There is something x'd out on the B2 but I gather that I am good for cars and trucks up to 3500 Kg. This is despite the fact that I had a CDL (Commercial Drivers License) in the US. But then why would I even dream of driving a big rig in Vietnam. Smile Third, the VN license will have an expiration date that is the same as the expiration on your home license. Fortunately, I had anticipated this and gotten an update just before I came here so I am good to 2020. My wife rather proudly pointed out that her license did not expire ever so I think maybe the license Mark and Rob got may be the same.

All in all this An is not a bad deal.
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