Site Search:
 
Get TEFL Certified & Start Your Adventure Today!
Teach English Abroad and Get Paid to see the World!
Job Discussion Forums Forum Index Job Discussion Forums
"The Internet's Meeting Place for ESL/EFL Students and Teachers from Around the World!"
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

Is TEFL getting better or worse as a career?
Goto page 1, 2, 3  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Job Discussion Forums Forum Index -> General Discussion
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
spanglish



Joined: 21 May 2009
Posts: 742
Location: working on that

PostPosted: Tue Nov 13, 2012 7:51 pm    Post subject: Is TEFL getting better or worse as a career? Reply with quote

I'm curious to hear opinions and experiences in different regions.

Are pay and benefits going up or down? Are employers demanding more qualifications and/or hours than before?

Is the number of TEFL teachers in the world increasing or decreasing?

Is the TEFL market getting larger or smaller?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
scot47



Joined: 10 Jan 2003
Posts: 15323

PostPosted: Tue Nov 13, 2012 8:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Worse. Much worse. When I goit into it in the late 60s there were lots of jobs that paid reasonably well, Now.....................
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Teacher in Rome



Joined: 09 Jul 2003
Posts: 1286

PostPosted: Tue Nov 13, 2012 8:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I can only answer for Italy.

Pay and benefits are stagnant. No increases for the last ten years, as far as I can see. This is about in line with everyone else's wages here.

Teaching as a whole is as "precarious" as it ever was. It's hard to fire teachers working in the state, but a whole load of teachers don't have permanent contracts anyway. Worth mentioning that if you don't have a permanent contract, you don't have contributions going in to your pension.

I've just been told that my exam marking work will be paid at an extra 10 an hour from this year. On the other hand, the travelling expenses that I used to be paid have now been scrapped. Result: net loss of about 5 an hour.

Employers aren't demanding more quals, but they are asking for more availability, so you might be asked to teach into the evening. I just turned down work where I would have taught until 10.30 at night. But this is just a reflection on work in Italy. Plenty of businesses (shops etc) close at 8 to 8.30 at night, meaning that if these people want lessons after work, you're teaching late.

As for the size of the TEFL market here - it's not really shrinking as far as I can see. Some corporate work is going, as companies close or downsize, but parents will almost always try to do what's best for their children. That means lots of homework lessons, YL, and exam preparation. (If you can bear it, that is!)
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
tttompatz



Joined: 06 Mar 2010
Posts: 1951
Location: Talibon, Bohol, Philippines

PostPosted: Wed Nov 14, 2012 4:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

It's getting better and (from hearsay accounts) worse.

In some regions, like East Asia, it is a vibrant and growing industry in the private sector with remuneration packages that are negotiable and there is certainly a large demand in the public sector / mainstream education for those with something more than a high school completion and a TEFL cert. and they tend to have fairly decent remuneration packages.

Demand in East Asia currently hires about 150,000 new EFL teachers per year and with the integration of ASEAN and the continued growing demand in China is expected to grow to over 250,000 positions in the next few years. **

(hearsay) In other regions EFL, like the local economies in those regions (EU or South America), generally appears to be a stagnant industry with low demand in the private sector (and remuneration packages that are just as low) and few openings in the public education sector and those openings in the public sector also usually require related credentials (degree, post graduate degree, teacher certification, etc),

** the vast majority of those positions will require at a minimum a Bachelor's degree, a TEFL cert and English fluency levels at near native speaker levels.

.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Perilla



Joined: 09 Jul 2010
Posts: 792
Location: Hong Kong

PostPosted: Thu Nov 15, 2012 3:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

TEFL has always been an industry of two halves. Good jobs and bad jobs. Good countries/regions and bad ones.

At the moment I think it'd be fair to say that in terms of work Asia is generally good and Europe is generally bad, but obviously there are discrepancies and different ways of looking at things.

For example, something which probably doesn't occur to most people when considering where to work is the trend in local air quality. Although most big cities in Asia offer plenty of work, the air quality can be abysmal, and its getting worse. HK is not the worst in this respect, but it's pretty bad, and I know of four expat teachers in their 50s, none of whom were smokers, who died in the last year from lung cancer. This might just be a nasty coincidence, but who knows.

What price do you put on health? Maybe it's better to scrape a living as a private school TEFLer in a remote Spanish town than to save plenty in Beijing while breathing pollution most days.

Overall TEFL numbers around the globe are certainly way higher than they were 10 years ago and are still increasing in Asia. But keep an eye on the details - and I don't just mean job details.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
spanglish



Joined: 21 May 2009
Posts: 742
Location: working on that

PostPosted: Fri Nov 16, 2012 1:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

One issue that seems to be hurting our industry is the Age of Austerity. Any educational program with government subsidies is feeling the squeeze and that gets passed on to us.

More long term, an issue that concerns me is the increase in globalization and technology. Once upon a time a 'native speaker' was a sought after commodity, a rarity. Now, through tech. everybody has got access to the whole world, including plenty of native speakers. I guess it's a case of adapt or die, but in the meantime I fear salaries will continue to go down.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
LongShiKong



Joined: 28 May 2007
Posts: 1082
Location: China

PostPosted: Sat Nov 17, 2012 4:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

spanglish wrote:
One issue that seems to be hurting our industry is the Age of Austerity.

Austerity is just the newest term for a decades-old trend. Back in 2003 in Vancouver, there were 100s applicants for just a part-time TEFL position--most were victims of recent public school ESL 'cutbacks'.

spanglish wrote:
Once upon a time a 'native speaker' was a sought after commodity, a rarity. Now, through tech. everybody has got access to the whole world, including plenty of native speakers.


Here in China, the ever increasing demand for native speakers still exceeds supply. If you or others get the sense than online teaching/learning or other tech is taking significant market share away from in-country native speakers, please tell us where you are.

tttompatz wrote:
Demand in East Asia currently hires about 150,000 new EFL teachers per year.

For all of East Asia? Seems low. How old are your figures? Here in China, most employers only prefer a TEFL cert.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
tttompatz



Joined: 06 Mar 2010
Posts: 1951
Location: Talibon, Bohol, Philippines

PostPosted: Sat Nov 17, 2012 5:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Fairly current and you will note that it was 150,000 NEW teachers not 150,000 teachers.

China will probably peak at about 500,000 teachers for 200 million students.

Most employers in China would take anyone who can speak English and they pay lip service to a TEFL cert but the requirements for immigration/safea are: a degree, TEFL cert and 2+ years of experience.

Yes, I know that in China, rules are meant to be broken when expedient to do so but if the crap hits the fan it will be the foreigner who pays the price.

.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
LongShiKong



Joined: 28 May 2007
Posts: 1082
Location: China

PostPosted: Sat Nov 17, 2012 9:02 am    Post subject: