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Soon starting my long journey to TEFL....
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peco



Joined: 27 Aug 2012
Posts: 11

PostPosted: Sun Jan 06, 2013 9:02 pm    Post subject: Soon starting my long journey to TEFL.... Reply with quote

Hi Everyone, thought i'd drop in and say hello as ive been a long time lurker and will soon be starting my long journey towards TEFL.

About me

I went travelling around Asia for 2.5 years back in 2009 and fell in love with the place (most notably China, Vietnam, Thailand), ive always been fascinated with asian culture & food so i kind of knew i would love it before i went travelling. Since coming back home i soon realised i wanted to live in Asia, not in the UK. After a year of racking my brain figuring out how i can get there and live comfortably i finally concluded that teaching was probably the safest and most reliable way of sustaining myself and also legally being able to live there for any long amount of time. I really want to live there for the rest of my life.

I don't have any qualifications, i know i need to get a degree so that's what im going to do.

Im quitting my job in Aug and will attend a college to get some A level's and then move onto uni for 3 years and get my degree.

The subject i plan to specialise in is Digital Media, i know its not related to teaching but i have a passion for it and really i want to study something i have interest in because otherwise i probably won't finish.

Once i get that I will probably do the extra year to get the teaching status here in the UK, i do want to be good at teaching so i feel this will make me a better teacher, ill also do whatever other qualifications that will make me a better teacher on a whole, i may or may not stay an additional year after that to get some experience, do you think i should stay for the experience or just head out to asia.

I lived in Bkk for 6 months and HCMC for 11 months while travelling so I am very confident with settling into these countries as it is something i have already done before and absolutely LOVED these 2 cities, i could live there for the rest of my life.

Even though i love them i will probably head to S.Korea first as ive heard it's a good place to start and I do genuinely really want to visit there.

I can live incredibly cheaply pretty much where ever i go, i like my food, and LOVE street food. I do not drink so im guessing that will save me a ton of cash too. Most my days the only money i spend is food.

So my journey will start soon and im hoping the job market will be ok in 5 years time. I know its in a few years time but what do you predict it will be like? Harder, easier, better/less pay ??.

Also ill be about 31/32 by the time i get my degree and experience under my belt, ive read being older can affect your prospects, is this true or does it just come down to how you present yourself.

wish me luck, hearing all your stories on here has been a massive driving force in getting my act together so i want to say thanks to you all.

Also let me know your thoughts on my plan im always looking for advice on this sort of stuff

Oh one more thing - is there anything you suggest I do in the next 4-5 years while getting my degree that will help me get a better paid job when im in Asia.
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Glenski



Joined: 15 Jan 2003
Posts: 12844
Location: Hokkaido, JAPAN

PostPosted: Sun Jan 06, 2013 10:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

What "teaching status" are you figuring you'll get in a year that is needed abroad? Most places in Asia just want a warm native English speaking body with a degree.

Nobody can predict the job market, IMO. Just keep tabs on what is happening where you want to go as you prepare. Big shakeups can happen unexpectedly, as they did twice in Japan.

Being 31/32 will not really affect your prospects or salary, IMO. People may wonder what took you so long to finish schooling, and they will scrutinize your work experience prior to that, of course. What do you have to show for that time?

Quote:
Oh one more thing - is there anything you suggest I do in the next 4-5 years while getting my degree that will help me get a better paid job when im in Asia.
Learn as much of the local language as possible, and bone up on business culture, because both are different from your own.
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golsa



Joined: 20 Nov 2011
Posts: 180

PostPosted: Sun Jan 06, 2013 11:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Glenski wrote:
What "teaching status" are you figuring you'll get in a year that is needed abroad? Most places in Asia just want a warm native English speaking body with a degree.


I assume he is British or Australian. In these countries, one can obtain a post-graduate certificate (the PGCE) + teaching practicum that results in one becoming holding QTS (qualified teacher status), which is the same as holding a teaching license in the United States.

If he is willing to go through that much work to teach English, I suggest that he simply majors in Education so he can get a much better job at an international school.

OP, obtaining QTS is a great idea, but once you have that you can forget about South Korea. With QTS, you can get a job at an international school that pays a western salary. Yes, such international schools exist all over Asia.
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Glenski



Joined: 15 Jan 2003
Posts: 12844
Location: Hokkaido, JAPAN

PostPosted: Mon Jan 07, 2013 7:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks, golsa. Even with a teaching license, people usually need a couple of years of teaching experience on it before international schools will take them. At least, that's the case in Japan.
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peco



Joined: 27 Aug 2012
Posts: 11

PostPosted: Mon Jan 07, 2013 6:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Glenski wrote:
What "teaching status" are you figuring you'll get in a year that is needed abroad? Most places in Asia just want a warm native English speaking body with a degree.

Nobody can predict the job market, IMO. Just keep tabs on what is happening where you want to go as you prepare. Big shakeups can happen unexpectedly, as they did twice in Japan.

Being 31/32 will not really affect your prospects or salary, IMO. People may wonder what took you so long to finish schooling, and they will scrutinize your work experience prior to that, of course. What do you have to show for that time?

Quote:
Oh one more thing - is there anything you suggest I do in the next 4-5 years while getting my degree that will help me get a better paid job when im in Asia.
Learn as much of the local language as possible, and bone up on business culture, because both are different from your own.


Yes as Golsa said, doing this will also give me a backup plan, if i need to come home i could get work as a teacher in the UK, i wasn't going to do this but i think its best if I do as then im covered all bases, just means another year in the UK Sad

Yes ill be sure to follow the news on here, can you recommend any blogs that are worth following?

Well i have been working since the age of 20, so i have office experience in a few office admin roles, i hope that will suffice.

Yes i want to work and live in China, Vietnam, Thailand, Korea, Japan, so i guess ill have to figure out where i head first and then work from there. Hope i can pick up some conversational stuff before i leave. I knew nothing when i left for travelling and got around fine so its no big worry for me. but speaking another language is definitely something i want to achieve before i die!

golsa wrote:
Glenski wrote:
What "teaching status" are you figuring you'll get in a year that is needed abroad? Most places in Asia just want a warm native English speaking body with a degree.


I assume he is British or Australian. In these countries, one can obtain a post-graduate certificate (the PGCE) + teaching practicum that results in one becoming holding QTS (qualified teacher status), which is the same as holding a teaching license in the United States.

If he is willing to go through that much work to teach English, I suggest that he simply majors in Education so he can get a much better job at an international school.

OP, obtaining QTS is a great idea, but once you have that you can forget about South Korea. With QTS, you can get a job at an international school that pays a western salary. Yes, such international schools exist all over Asia.


Thanks for the suggestion but as i said i really don't think i have it in me to go through 3 years of uni studying something day-in-day-out that i don't really have a passion for. As ive read on here before, employers don't really care what subject just as long as you have those letters before your name. of course education would be ideal but i don't want to risk failing my degree because i was bored and had no drive. I would rather do something i feel i could complete. Also i wouldn't mind learning about film and editing as its something I could take over to Asia with me, perhaps do some freelance stuff.

Why forget about S.Korea??? Do they no have International, Higher Paying schools available for people with QTS ???

I really would like to live in Korea I don't just want to go there for the work, its somewhere ive always wanted to go as im a big fan of S.Korean Cinema (must be a good enough reason surely Smile)
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Glenski



Joined: 15 Jan 2003
Posts: 12844
Location: Hokkaido, JAPAN

PostPosted: Mon Jan 07, 2013 10:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

peco wrote:
Yes ill be sure to follow the news on here, can you recommend any blogs that are worth following?
On Japan?

Quote:
Well i have been working since the age of 20, so i have office experience in a few office admin roles, i hope that will suffice.
IMO, no. Business is done differently here, and office experience is a dime a dozen here, usually doled out to Japanese part-time office staff. Even my wife who has a secretarial license and experience found it hard to land a job, with tests to take and 3 interviews at one company alone (just for a temp job).

Quote:
Yes i want to work and live in China, Vietnam, Thailand, Korea, Japan, so i guess ill have to figure out where i head first and then work from there.
Come to each country's respective forum and read their FAQs. Then ask specific questions there.

golsa wrote:
Thanks for the suggestion but as i said i really don't think i have it in me to go through 3 years of uni studying something day-in-day-out that i don't really have a passion for.
Are you really interested in teaching? It doesn't sound like it, which means you will do a disservice to your employer and students.

Quote:
Also i wouldn't mind learning about film and editing as its something I could take over to Asia with me, perhaps do some freelance stuff.
Like what? You'll likely need to know more than just a smattering of conversation in the local language.

Quote:
I really would like to live in Korea I don't just want to go there for the work, its somewhere ive always wanted to go as im a big fan of S.Korean Cinema (must be a good enough reason surely Smile)
I like British TV comedies, but I wouldn't want to live in the UK. So, IMO, no, it's not a good enough reason.
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golsa



Joined: 20 Nov 2011
Posts: 180

PostPosted: Mon Jan 07, 2013 11:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

peco wrote:
Thanks for the suggestion but as i said i really don't think i have it in me to go through 3 years of uni studying something day-in-day-out that i don't really have a passion for. As ive read on here before, employers don't really care what subject just as long as you have those letters before your name. of course education would be ideal but i don't want to risk failing my degree because i was bored and had no drive. I would rather do something i feel i could complete. Also i wouldn't mind learning about film and editing as its something I could take over to Asia with me, perhaps do some freelance stuff.

Why forget about S.Korea??? Do they no have International, Higher Paying schools available for people with QTS ???

I really would like to live in Korea I don't just want to go there for the work, its somewhere ive always wanted to go as im a big fan of S.Korean Cinema (must be a good enough reason surely :))


I didn't intend to say that you should forget South Korea completely. However, I did imply that you should forget teaching EFL at a hogwon or as part of the EPIK program after you complete a PGCE and have QTS.

Once you have a PGCE and QTS, there is no reason for you to waste your time in EFL jobs created for people who don't have proper education credentials.

You already know that you want to teach abroad and teach English, so please listen and learn from those of us who made mistakes and did things the hard way. You don't yet have a degree, so when you go to university, you absolutely should major in Education and gain your QTS. Perhaps the classes will be more boring than majoring in Film or Art or what ever, but you already said that you want to get a diploma so you can continue teaching. I already made the mistake of majoring in my passion and still ended up teaching English. I highly suggest that you deal with the education classes and obtain QTS in as little time possible so you can have a good job at an international school. Forget about these EFL jobs in China and South Korea - they're not good jobs.

With an Education major, QTS, and a few years experience, you'll have a much better job than most of us can dream of. Yes, you can do this in South Korea or almost any country you can name. But there is no reason that you must work for low level programs, like EPIK, or hogwons to teach English abroad.
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artemisia



Joined: 04 Nov 2008
Posts: 867
Location: the world

PostPosted: Tue Jan 08, 2013 2:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

OP: I agree with golsa that planning your degree carefully is a wise move. You could try to combine a degree in digital media with a UK shortage school subject as a minor (or vice versa). English literature* is a good example. That way, youíd be getting to do what you want while still investing in a subject you could potentially use for teaching. I donít quite know how/if digital media would translate for secondary (UK or international), but I suggest you check various courses and ask teacher training course providers.

If youíre going to go the state school teacher training route, getting a PGCE before you travel overseas would be advisable. If you live abroad and then return to the UK to study, youíll encounter the home/international student fees issue because residency matters. Probably best to check with some specific course providers about that, too; they should know. There are also other ways to train as a teacher in the UK, once you have a relevant degree, other than doing a PGCE.

As Glenski pointed out, you usually need experience in your home country to be considered for (the better) international school teaching jobs. It all really depends on what kind of time investment you want to make in your education while still based in the UK. Just be aware that itís usually easier to get school teaching work straight after qualifying and not usually after a longish gap overseas (unless that gap includes relevant work in a secondary school).

*Maths, sciences, modern languages and English (top priority subjects). Geography, history, computer science, Latin, Greek, music, biology and physical education are also subjects to target.
http://www.education.gov.uk/get-into-teaching/subjects-age-groups/teach-chemistry/funding-pay-benefits
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HLJHLJ



Joined: 06 Oct 2009
Posts: 921

PostPosted: Tue Jan 08, 2013 4:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think you need to be clear about what it is you are aiming for exactly. If you want to teach ESL then do the digital media degree, followed by a short CELTA or equivalent course, and you'll be good to go. If you stick with it long term, then you'll eventually want to look at postgrad options, (MA, Delta, etc) after you've been teaching for a while. If this is the route you are looking at, a PGCE won't confer much benefit. You can also look at Access courses rather than A-Levels, as they only take 1 year rather than 2.

If you are aiming to be an actual content teacher in international schools (or UK ones) then a digital media degree isn't going to cut it. The PGCE is designed to train you to teach your main subject. Are there many opportunities to teach digital media at school age level? Does it contain enough credits in a core subject (English, Maths, Science) for you to specialise in something else for the PGCE?

Even if you meet the requirements, places on PGCE courses are very competitive, and they want to see a clear route into employment. You need to be absolutely certain that the degree you choose will demonstrate that. I guess you could use it to try for an ICT specialism, but that is probably THE most competitive PGCE option, and preference will be given to applicants with a straight ICT background.

Assuming you are able to get a PGCE you will then need to stay in the UK for at least 2 more years. For the first year you will only be an NQT and you need to work that NQT year if you plan to teach in the UK at some point. NQT places are also competitive, and they almost always go to new graduates. If you leave the UK without completing it, you will likely to struggle to find a place when you return. After doing your NQT year, you need a year as a fully qualified teacher to gain experience. International schools usually want 2 years FQT experience, and UK schools want at least 1.

If the whole point of this is to become a teacher it would make a lot more sense to do a BEd. At the end of the 3 years you will have your QTS and can go straight into your NQT year. Your argument about only studying something you are passionate about doesn't make a great deal of sense when you are talking about making a career out of teaching. If you can't bear the thought of studying teaching for 3 years, how are you going to cope with actually doing it every day for the next 5, 10, 20 years?
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peco



Joined: 27 Aug 2012
Posts: 11

PostPosted: Tue Jan 08, 2013 7:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Glenski wrote:
peco wrote:
Yes ill be sure to follow the news on here, can you recommend any blogs that are worth following?
On Japan?

Quote:
Well i have been working since the age of 20, so i have office experience in a few office admin roles, i hope that will suffice.
IMO, no. Business is done differently here, and office experience is a dime a dozen here, usually doled out to Japanese part-time office staff. Even my wife who has a secretarial license and experience found it hard to land a job, with tests to take and 3 interviews at one company alone (just for a temp job).

Quote:
Yes i want to work and live in China, Vietnam, Thailand, Korea, Japan, so i guess ill have to figure out where i head first and then work from there.
Come to each country's respective forum and read their FAQs. Then ask specific questions there.

golsa wrote:
Thanks for the suggestion but as i said i really don't think i have it in me to go through 3 years of uni studying something day-in-day-out that i don't really have a passion for.
Are you really interested in teaching? It doesn't sound like it, which means you will do a disservice to your employer and students.

Quote:
Also i wouldn't mind learning about film and editing as its something I could take over to Asia with me, perhaps do some freelance stuff.
Like what? You'll likely need to know more than just a smattering of conversation in the local language.

Quote:
I really would like to live in Korea I don't just want to go there for the work, its somewhere ive always wanted to go as im a big fan of S.Korean Cinema (must be a good enough reason surely Smile)
I like British TV comedies, but I wouldn't want to live in the UK. So, IMO, no, it's not a good enough reason.


-All of SE Asia really, just some blogs to follow and people blogging how it is out there, just so i can get an idea and the daily living and what to expect from teaching
-Will do thanks
-Well this is my big predicament, I don't know if im big on teaching because ive never done it before, i can imagine it to be rewarding and if paid well could definitely dedicate my time to becoming a good teacher. honestly my main goal was just to get out to Asia and live there as i loved my time spent there. Initially i didn't think about teaching but then after researching it became obvious i would need a job for visa reasons, teaching seemed the most plausible thing to do.
-Freelance online i mean, its what i was doing when i was living in Vietnam before.
-That's because its crap weather all year round, a dump and one of the most expensive countries to live in. Well i love travelling, love asia, love asian food, asian culture, asian women so im pretty sure Korea will tick those boxes, if it doesn't well just move onto the next place, i want to live in a few countries in Asia.

=================================

golsa wrote:
peco wrote:
Thanks for the suggestion but as i said i really don't think i have it in me to go through 3 years of uni studying something day-in-day-out that i don't really have a passion for. As ive read on here before, employers don't really care what subject just as long as you have those letters before your name. of course education would be ideal but i don't want to risk failing my degree because i was bored and had no drive. I would rather do something i feel i could complete. Also i wouldn't mind learning about film and editing as its something I could take over to Asia with me, perhaps do some freelance stuff.

Why forget about S.Korea??? Do they no have International, Higher Paying schools available for people with QTS ???

I really would like to live in Korea I don't just want to go there for the work, its somewhere ive always wanted to go as im a big fan of S.Korean Cinema (must be a good enough reason surely Smile)


I didn't intend to say that you should forget South Korea completely. However, I did imply that you should forget teaching EFL at a hogwon or as part of the EPIK program after you complete a PGCE and have QTS.

Once you have a PGCE and QTS, there is no reason for you to waste your time in EFL jobs created for people who don't have proper education credentials.

You already know that you want to teach abroad and teach English, so please listen and learn from those of us who made mistakes and did things the hard way. You don't yet have a degree, so when you go to university, you absolutely should major in Education and gain your QTS. Perhaps the classes will be more boring than majoring in Film or Art or what ever, but you already said that you want to get a diploma so you can continue teaching. I already made the mistake of majoring in my passion and still ended up teaching English. I highly suggest that you deal with the education classes and obtain QTS in as little time possible so you can have a good job at an international school. Forget about these EFL jobs in China and South Korea - they're not good jobs.

With an Education major, QTS, and a few years experience, you'll have a much better job than most of us can dream of. Yes, you can do this in South Korea or almost any country you can name. But there is no reason that you must work for low level programs, like EPIK, or hogwons to teach English abroad.


Ok cool well that's good to know, because i was wondering whether a degree in teaching as opposed to media would really benefit me that much in terms of landing a better job (ie more money) The end result of either a degree in teaching or media with an extra year to get QTS will equal to a qualified teaching status regardless of which route i pick.

I know i should major in education or teaching it's the most obvious thing to do, but im just not sure if i can risk taking a subject i have no experience in or know whether i will be able to follow it through to the end.

Ill be 27 by the time i get to Uni, this is really a make or break situation for me, if i fail ill never be able to get out there, ill be in too much debt and no money to find another trip through uni. I just don't know if i can risk taking a subject i have no idea about.

Im going to have to think long and hard about it. I guess it will massively benefit me in the future with my job applications and I really do want to live a comfortable life and earn a decent wage

How much better are the jobs for people with a major in education and a few years experience???

=================================

artemisia wrote:
OP: I agree with golsa that planning your degree carefully is a wise move. You could try to combine a degree in digital media with a UK shortage school subject as a minor (or vice versa). English literature* is a good example. That way, youíd be getting to do what you want while still investing in a subject you could potentially use for teaching. I donít quite know how/if digital media would translate for secondary (UK or international), but I suggest you check various courses and ask teacher training course providers.

If youíre going to go the state school teacher training route, getting a PGCE before you travel overseas would be advisable. If you live abroad and then return to the UK to study, youíll encounter the home/international student fees issue because residency matters. Probably best to check with some specific course providers about that, too; they should know. There are also other ways to train as a teacher in the UK, once you have a relevant degree, other than doing a PGCE.

As Glenski pointed out, you usually need experience in your home country to be considered for (the better) international school teaching jobs. It all really depends on what kind of time investment you want to make in your education while still based in the UK. Just be aware that itís usually easier to get school teaching work straight after qualifying and not usually after a longish gap overseas (unless that gap includes relevant work in a secondary school).

*Maths, sciences, modern languages and English (top priority subjects). Geography, history, computer science, Latin, Greek, music, biology and physical education are also subjects to target.
http://www.education.gov.uk/get-into-teaching/subjects-age-groups/teach-chemistry/funding-pay-benefits


yes im going to have to go back to the drawing board and decide whether a degree in media or a degree in teaching is the best and what is really the most feasible.

Thanks for that bit of info i guess it will be best to stay the extra year and get the PGCE, i really want to get out to asia so was thinking of skipping this but i guess not now.

Teaching PE would be pretty cool Smile

==========================================



HLJHLJ wrote:
I think you need to be clear about what it is you are aiming for exactly. If you want to teach ESL then do the digital media degree, followed by a short CELTA or equivalent course, and you'll be good to go. If you stick with it long term, then you'll eventually want to look at postgrad options, (MA, Delta, etc) after you've been teaching for a while. If this is the route you are looking at, a PGCE won't confer much benefit. You can also look at Access courses rather than A-Levels, as they only take 1 year rather than 2.

If you are aiming to be an actual content teacher in international schools (or UK ones) then a digital media degree isn't going to cut it. The PGCE is designed to train you to teach your main subject. Are there many opportunities to teach digital media at school age level? Does it contain enough credits in a core subject (English, Maths, Science) for you to specialise in something else for the PGCE?

Even if you meet the requirements, places on PGCE courses are very competitive, and they want to see a clear route into employment. You need to be absolutely certain that the degree you choose will demonstrate that. I guess you could use it to try for an ICT specialism, but that is probably THE most competitive PGCE option, and preference will be given to applicants with a straight ICT background.

Assuming you are able to get a PGCE you will then need to stay in the UK for at least 2 more years. For the first year you will only be an NQT and you need to work that NQT year if you plan to teach in the UK at some point. NQT places are also competitive, and they almost always go to new graduates. If you leave the UK without completing it, you will likely to struggle to find a place when you return. After doing your NQT year, you need a year as a fully qualified teacher to gain experience. International schools usually want 2 years FQT experience, and UK schools want at least 1.

If the whole point of this is to become a teacher it would make a lot more sense to do a BEd. At the end of the 3 years you will have your QTS and can go straight into your NQT year. Your argument about only studying something you are passionate about doesn't make a great deal of sense when you are talking about making a career out of teaching. If you can't bear the thought of studying teaching for 3 years, how are you going to cope with actually doing it every day for the next 5, 10, 20 years?



well im aiming to live/work in various different countries in Asia, this is pretty much my main goal. I want to earn good money because i want to travel.

Yes i will be taking an Access To HE in Media or Teaching

Yes i know it does sound incredibly stupid to study something i probably won't be having a career in, but the way i see it - i want to get out to asia, no matter what

I hate my job here, doesn't mean im going to quit it....it pays the bills, hating my job in asia will be a bit better because at least ill be in an environment i prefer.

But as i have said before. I don want to live out there for the majority of my life, and i want to have a good life, earning good money ($40k + when im much older). In order to reap the benefits now i guess i must put in the hard work.....but on the flip, i don't want to fail, mess up getting any degree and being stuck here for the rest of my life. I hope you can understand my predicament.

Thanks for all the input so far, you have giving me a lot to think about already
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Glenski



Joined: 15 Jan 2003
Posts: 12844
Location: Hokkaido, JAPAN

PostPosted: Wed Jan 09, 2013 10:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

peco wrote:
-Well this is my big predicament, I don't know if im big on teaching because ive never done it before, i can imagine it to be rewarding and if paid well could definitely dedicate my time to becoming a good teacher.
If you are in it only for the money, as this statement suggests, then don't go into it.


Quote:
Well i love travelling, love asia, love asian food, asian culture, asian women so im pretty sure Korea will tick those boxes, if it doesn't well just move onto the next place, i want to live in a few countries in Asia.
It honestly sounds like you just want a fun time, an extended vacation. You really haven't talked much about the job at all. That's a real key point here.

Quote:
How much better are the jobs for people with a major in education and a few years experience???
In Japan, not much.

Quote:
I hate my job here, doesn't mean im going to quit it....it pays the bills, hating my job in asia will be a bit better because at least ill be in an environment i prefer.
This is a really unrealistic POV, especially for the sake of your students and coworkers.

Quote:
But as i have said before. I don want to live out there for the majority of my life, and i want to have a good life, earning good money ($40k + when im much older).
How much for starters? You may have some serious student loans to pay off. BTW, in Japan, starting wages are about 200,000-250,000 yen/month. Do the math to see how well that fits your own currency. You will spend about half that on basic necessities here, leaving the rest for whatever else in life you choose (or have to spend in loan repayments).
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golsa



Joined: 20 Nov 2011
Posts: 180

PostPosted: Thu Jan 10, 2013 11:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

peco wrote:

But as i have said before. I don want to live out there for the majority of my life, and i want to have a good life, earning good money ($40k + when im much older). In order to reap the benefits now i guess i must put in the hard work.....but on the flip, i don't want to fail, mess up getting any degree and being stuck here for the rest of my life. I hope you can understand my predicament.


An education degree + QTS + 2 years experience in your home country can easily get you $40k+ per year at an international school.
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peco



Joined: 27 Aug 2012
Posts: 11

PostPosted: Thu Jan 10, 2013 7:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Glenski wrote:
peco wrote:
-Well this is my big predicament, I don't know if im big on teaching because ive never done it before, i can imagine it to be rewarding and if paid well could definitely dedicate my time to becoming a good teacher.
If you are in it only for the money, as this statement suggests, then don't go into it.


Give me a better option to live out there and ill do it. Teaching definitely seems like the easiest to achieve in terms of education, easiest to get into, very good pay. Its even more than what i'm earning here in the UK

Quote:
Well i love travelling, love asia, love asian food, asian culture, asian women so im pretty sure Korea will tick those boxes, if it doesn't well just move onto the next place, i want to live in a few countries in Asia.
It honestly sounds like you just want a fun time, an extended vacation. You really haven't talked much about the job at all. That's a real key point here.[/quote]

In my ideal world I would never have a job and travel to where ever i wanted lol. But unfortunately i haven't won the lottery yet. Therefore i have to make the most out of my situation.

I want to live in Asia, simple as. That's the real key point, i don't really care what job I do, if it pays the bills and allows me to save money ill do it. So hence why the 'job' isn't discussed much. Ill do whatever honestly. Ive opted for teaching because it seems the easiest to get into ans I do love kids and definitely enjoy doing something constructive with my time, I know educating kids would definitely make me happy in a way so hence why im looking towards teaching.

What would you do in my situation?

Quote:
How much better are the jobs for people with a major in education and a few years experience???
In Japan, not much.[/quote]

Thanks for the input, What about Korea, China, Thai ?

Quote:
I hate my job here, doesn't mean im going to quit it....it pays the bills, hating my job in asia will be a bit better because at least ill be in an environment i prefer.
This is a really unrealistic POV, especially for the sake of your students and coworkers.[/quote]

Why is it unrealistic? Its merely an observation of my life. I know that I can be very good at anything i put my mind to. If i know teaching will benefit me in terms of allowing me to stay in asia and also make me money then I will be good at it. Once i set my mind to something I am extremely dedicated. im pretty sure it will beat the job im doing at the moment.

Quote:
But as i have said before. I don want to live out there for the majority of my life, and i want to have a good life, earning good money ($40k + when im much older).
How much for starters? You may have some serious student loans to pay off. BTW, in Japan, starting wages are about 200,000-250,000 yen/month. Do the math to see how well that fits your own currency. You will spend about half that on basic necessities here, leaving the rest for whatever else in life you choose (or have to spend in loan repayments).[/quote]

I meant to say 'I DO want to live in Asia most my life'

Student finance really isn't that bad from what ive heard, every student i speak to says they hardly notice it coming out of your wage, plus you only pay on what you earn over a certain amount.

For a starter wage in a teaching job.....i don't know the average wage but i would say $1500 per month. but the wage doesn't really bother me. What im more concerned with is my quality of life and how much I can save.

Ive read that people are able to save $10k a year working in Korea!!!!! If i can do that in a starter job that will be amazing.

225,000 YEN is about $2500, wow that's a very good starting wage. Its numbers like that that make me want to get into TEFL

golsa wrote:
peco wrote:

But as i have said before. I don want to live out there for the majority of my life, and i want to have a good life, earning good money ($40k + when im much older). In order to reap the benefits now i guess i must put in the hard work.....but on the flip, i don't want to fail, mess up getting any degree and being stuck here for the rest of my life. I hope you can understand my predicament.


An education degree + QTS + 2 years experience in your home country can easily get you $40k+ per year at an international school.


Wow that's pretty cool. Out of interest would 2 years experience in Asia be equally as beneficial as 2 years back home?

Preferably i would rather get my QTS and then leave and start my life in Korea.
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golsa



Joined: 20 Nov 2011
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PostPosted: Thu Jan 10, 2013 8:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

peco wrote:

Wow that's pretty cool. Out of interest would 2 years experience in Asia be equally as beneficial as 2 years back home?

Preferably i would rather get my QTS and then leave and start my life in Korea.


No. International schools generally want you to have 2-3 years experience in your home country because they use the British national curriculum at their school. If your only teaching experience is in Korea, then you'll only be familiar with the Korean curriculum.

Yea, it's another two years added to your time before you can start work, but it will absolutely be worth it. Having QTS and 2 years experience teaching in your home country will quite literally double your yearly salary until you retire.
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peco



Joined: 27 Aug 2012
Posts: 11

PostPosted: Thu Jan 10, 2013 8:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

golsa wrote:
peco wrote:

Wow that's pretty cool. Out of interest would 2 years experience in Asia be equally as beneficial as 2 years back home?

Preferably i would rather get my QTS and then leave and start my life in Korea.


No. International schools generally want you to have 2-3 years experience in your home country because they use the British national curriculum at their school. If your only teaching experience is in Korea, then you'll only be familiar with the Korean curriculum.

Yea, it's another two years added to your time before you can start work, but it will absolutely be worth it. Having QTS and 2 years experience teaching in your home country will quite literally double your yearly salary until you retire.


wow that's pretty amazing

and does this apply to most Asian countries?
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