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What area of the USA is easiest to find good work

 
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nellychess



Joined: 25 Mar 2005
Posts: 152
Location: USA

PostPosted: Mon Feb 11, 2013 12:01 am    Post subject: What area of the USA is easiest to find good work Reply with quote

I will have a BA in Sociology, a TEFL 100 hrs cert with 60 in class, and 3 years teaching abroad(Korea, and Argentina).
I would get the CELTA as well if it would help.

I know nothing of the USA market, pay, qualifications needed etc.

I am a US citizen.

Thanks
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DebMer



Joined: 02 Jan 2012
Posts: 211
Location: Southern California

PostPosted: Mon Feb 11, 2013 12:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

You might consider targeting a region with a lot of immigrants and setting up business on your own, or looking for a privately owned language school. Your degree would likely prevent you getting anything state funded. Each state should have a government page with details as to what their program requires of its instructors. In California it has to be an English, foreign language or communications-related degree.

I hold an English degree, but am only qualified to teach non-credit for the community college until I have a masters. And my ESL job is very part time, as the state or college regulations don't allow more than 9 or 10 hours a week per instructor. I'm sorry to say that here, in the land of a multitude of Mexican immigrants, it's not easy to get full time work in ESL. Sad
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Xie Lin



Joined: 21 Oct 2011
Posts: 514

PostPosted: Mon Feb 11, 2013 12:51 am    Post subject: Re: What area of the USA is easiest to find good work Reply with quote

nellychess wrote:
I will have a BA in Sociology, a TEFL 100 hrs cert with 60 in class, and 3 years teaching abroad(Korea, and Argentina).
I would get the CELTA as well if it would help.

I know nothing of the USA market, pay, qualifications needed etc.



I'm afraid the news is not very good, at least in my part of the country. I've been back in the US for several years now. Here in the Northeast you'd be under qualified for most positions. The possible exceptions here might be some community-based ESL programs, and language schools. However, even these employers will often require a minimum of a related BA, with "MA preferred." The other problem you will face is the large number of applicants for each advertised position--when you do find a position for which you are qualified, the employer will usually have applications from a number of more highly qualified hopefuls.

Of course there are exceptions, but there is a lot of competition right now for those positions, and more and more of them are part-time. Perhaps things are different in another part of the country, but that's how it is here.

.
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nellychess



Joined: 25 Mar 2005
Posts: 152
Location: USA

PostPosted: Mon Feb 11, 2013 1:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I figured it would be like you guys are saying, but I was hopeful there was some area that was more desperate for teachers. I'd move to the middle of Alaska or somewhere for a good job. Maybe there's no hope anywhere, I don't know.
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DebMer



Joined: 02 Jan 2012
Posts: 211
Location: Southern California

PostPosted: Mon Feb 11, 2013 4:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Try thinking outside of the box on it.

I have successfully become an enrichment teacher to homeschool students as a private business in my home. I'd like to increase my ESL hours and experience, so I'm considering doing the same with adult ESL in the community, but with a rented space (not keen on having unknown adults in my home). I'm working on creating classes that will offer something different from what the community college offers. For example, I always have students in my multi-level adult classes (through the C.C.) who desperately need to learn basic phonics to improve their reading skills. I'm thinking about putting a class together to teach beginner level reading, listening and conversation skills, how to fill out forms, how to find and utilize community services, etc. Something very practical for recent immigrants. Another idea is to teach ESL and culture through American literature for intermediate and advanced levels. This is the type of ESL class that the college doesn't offer for non-credit or credit students. I think it would be unique. This is also the one I'm not sure there would be a market for, though, so I'll be putting my feelers out before committing to it.

Anyway, just some thoughts. You'd obviously want something stable to do part time while developing ideas, if something like this interests you.
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nellychess



Joined: 25 Mar 2005
Posts: 152
Location: USA

PostPosted: Mon Feb 11, 2013 4:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wow, that's really smart. I think that will work, and you stick with it.
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Xie Lin



Joined: 21 Oct 2011
Posts: 514

PostPosted: Mon Feb 11, 2013 1:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Nellychess, it occurs to me that your experience in Korea might be of greater value to you if you were to focus on the US locations with the largest (recent) Korean immigrant population. These seem to be mainly Los Angeles and New York City including nearby counties of both cities; followed by Baltimore-Washington D.C., Hawaii, and a few other California locations. These particular locations could have the disadvantage of seeming desirable to your competition; but if you research the next tier or so below these, you may come up with some other possibilities that appeal to you. One county in New Jersey has a Korean population of over 56%. (Though I don't know the ratio of immigrant to Korean-American, surely there is a sizable immigrant population.)

While you won't qualify for public school and government agency jobs, you could look into the numerous non-profits that provide immigrant and refugee services--Catholic Charities and Goodwill, for example. If you can find organizations working with Korean immigrants, you might be able to get more mileage out of your time in Korea. And, of course, as you upgrade your qualifications, you'll have more options open to you.

Good luck!

.
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Ixchel



Joined: 11 Mar 2003
Posts: 155
Location: The 7th level of hell

PostPosted: Sun Feb 17, 2013 1:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Xie Lin wrote:
Nellychess, it occurs to me that your experience in Korea might be of greater value to you if you were to focus on the US locations with the largest (recent) Korean immigrant population. These seem to be mainly Los Angeles and New York City including nearby counties of both cities; followed by Baltimore-Washington D.C., Hawaii, and a few other California locations. These particular locations could have the disadvantage of seeming desirable to your competition; but if you research the next tier or so below these, you may come up with some other possibilities that appeal to you. One county in New Jersey has a Korean population of over 56%. (Though I don't know the ratio of immigrant to Korean-American, surely there is a sizable immigrant population.)

While you won't qualify for public school and government agency jobs, you could look into the numerous non-profits that provide immigrant and refugee services--Catholic Charities and Goodwill, for example. If you can find organizations working with Korean immigrants, you might be able to get more mileage out of your time in Korea. And, of course, as you upgrade your qualifications, you'll have more options open to you.

Good luck!

.

California has the highest Korean population in the US and Los Angeles the largest Korean population in California. I live in a Korean neighborhood and they don't pay for tutoring. The kids learn English within a year or less and the adults attend free adult school classes. We have an extensive adult school system attached to local school districts.
On the other hand you can make a lot of money tutoring from home. I always have. You charge what the market bears.
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