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Public school hours

 
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it'snotmyfault



Joined: 14 May 2012
Posts: 527

PostPosted: Sun Mar 31, 2013 11:26 pm    Post subject: Public school hours Reply with quote

Some of the job adverts say you work around 18-20 hours but you have to be there from 7:30-8:00 until 3 or 4 in the afternoon.

What do people do when they're not teaching? Do they find BS stuff for you to do in the office or are you free to come and go, get on with some studying etc.

Sorry if this has been asked before.
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plumpy nut



Joined: 12 Mar 2011
Posts: 586

PostPosted: Mon Apr 01, 2013 2:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The 18 to 20 hours a week is the amount of time you are in a class with students per week. When you're not in class their may be a myriad of things you will do or can do. Prepare for classes, or just use it to relax, especially if it all of a sudden seems to you that preparing might be pointless. Laughing

I suspect you will have to grade books which can be done during your break hours or it can be done in class, your choice. Also you will undoubtedly have to make tests. You're class load is actually a moderate load, believe it or not.
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tttompatz



Joined: 06 Mar 2010
Posts: 1951
Location: Talibon, Bohol, Philippines

PostPosted: Mon Apr 01, 2013 11:02 am    Post subject: Re: Public school hours Reply with quote

it'snotmyfault wrote:
Some of the job adverts say you work around 18-20 hours but you have to be there from 7:30-8:00 until 3 or 4 in the afternoon.

What do people do when they're not teaching? Do they find BS stuff for you to do in the office or are you free to come and go, get on with some studying etc.

Sorry if this has been asked before.


All the things that real teachers do....
Lesson planing,
lesson preparation
material preparation/creation
researching materials
marking
correcting papers/worksheets
etc.

They shouldn't need to find "BS stuff" for you to do if you are actually doing your job.

If they do need to find BS stuff for you to do then chances are you won't be there for very long.

.
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it'snotmyfault



Joined: 14 May 2012
Posts: 527

PostPosted: Mon Apr 01, 2013 12:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for the replies.

I wasn't suggesting that I slack off from doing the job, heaven forbid!!

It actually sounds more like a "proper job" than most of the public school posts in China where I am, there's no real office hours required here, just the prep which is done in my free time.
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plumpy nut



Joined: 12 Mar 2011
Posts: 586

PostPosted: Tue Apr 02, 2013 1:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

it'snotmyfault wrote:
Thanks for the replies.

I wasn't suggesting that I slack off from doing the job, heaven forbid!!

It actually sounds more like a "proper job" than most of the public school posts in China where I am, there's no real office hours required here, just the prep which is done in my free time.


Thai classes are generally separated into students that are ready for the material you are teaching and lots of other classes that are not. They have a tier system within many of the schools; parents who have children that are better prepared will pay to have their children in the same class with other children that are better prepared. Other children get left out and just get their certificates or whatever they are given. This is something that would be illegal in the West. What this means is that many or most of the students in the good classes, you will see learn. However even in the really bad classes you will have 1 or 2 students who are prepared and ready to learn.

Almost all of the classes have students who would learn but unfortunately other students particularly the males will drown out your teaching. How you get around this I don't know unless you have a Thai teacher in the class with you with a stick.

Another problem is cheating. One student will do the homework for 3-4 of his buddies or in the bad classes almost the entire class. Even the good students in good classes will habitually share answers. There is no concept in Thai culture that a person has to do his own work unless forced to do so.

Lots of luck making an impact on most of the students, because a lack of readiness in the students will make it very difficult if not impossible to have an impact on most of the students. The school I taught in was a pretty average Thai school and I was absolutely shocked. I taught in another school where the students were represented to me by the principal as highly select and in reality most were absolutely abysmal with arrogant characters. Fortunately I didn't teach (last) at that school for too long. The English curricula for the students included English for fortune telling, and advertisements. Try to glean from that what you can about how prepared the students were for academics of any sort.
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it'snotmyfault



Joined: 14 May 2012
Posts: 527

PostPosted: Tue Apr 02, 2013 2:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

plumpy nut wrote:
it'snotmyfault wrote:
Thanks for the replies.

I wasn't suggesting that I slack off from doing the job, heaven forbid!!

It actually sounds more like a "proper job" than most of the public school posts in China where I am, there's no real office hours required here, just the prep which is done in my free time.


Thai classes are generally separated into students that are ready for the material you are teaching and lots of other classes that are not. They have a tier system within many of the schools; parents who have children that are better prepared will pay to have their children in the same class with other children that are better prepared. Other children get left out and just get their certificates or whatever they are given. This is something that would be illegal in the West. What this means is that many or most of the students in the good classes, you will see learn. However even in the really bad classes you will have 1 or 2 students who are prepared and ready to learn.

Almost all of the classes have students who would learn but unfortunately other students particularly the males will drown out your teaching. How you get around this I don't know unless you have a Thai teacher in the class with you with a stick.

Another problem is cheating. One student will do the homework for 3-4 of his buddies or in the bad classes almost the entire class. Even the good students in good classes will habitually share answers. There is no concept in Thai culture that a person has to do his own work unless forced to do so.

Lots of luck making an impact on most of the students, because a lack of readiness in the students will make it very difficult if not impossible to have an impact on most of the students. The school I taught in was a pretty average Thai school and I was absolutely shocked. I taught in another school where the students were represented to me by the principal as highly select and in reality most were absolutely abysmal with arrogant characters. Fortunately I didn't teach (last) at that school for too long. The English curricula for the students included English for fortune telling, and advertisements. Try to glean from that what you can about how prepared the students were for academics of any sort.


You paint a sad but highly believable picture. I've read quite a few posts about public school positions and there's not many positive ones.
I'm sure there's lots of reasons for this, and not all of them are down to the schools and the students, but overall it doesn't look great.

Are there some recommended ways to avoid ending up in a (really) bad school, or is a lot of it just down to luck?
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plumpy nut



Joined: 12 Mar 2011
Posts: 586

PostPosted: Wed Apr 03, 2013 12:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

it'snotmyfault wrote:


Are there some recommended ways to avoid ending up in a (really) bad school, or is a lot of it just down to luck?


You might come to Thailand and talk to teachers that work at specific schools. You might find something good.
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MaiPenRai



Joined: 17 Jan 2006
Posts: 373
Location: BKK

PostPosted: Thu Apr 04, 2013 2:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

IN 90% of the cases, when working for a public school, you are working on a monthly salary, not hourly like in a language school. This means regular 8-4 hours and you should be professional enough to find things to do in relation to your job during those hours.

Plan
Prep
Mark
Research
Chat/Help with Ss during breaks
Chat/Help Thai teachers
Get involved in school activities/functions
Even studying Thai would be considered job related IMHO
Etc.

I hate when I hear people (not OP, just general) moan about not being able to go home between classes. As a teacher at a public school on a monthly salary, this is your job. This is pretty common everywhere in the world by the way.

If you (not OP, just in general)want that kind of freedom, its best to work at a language school or teach private classes.

AND, rather than moan about all the unmotivated Ss you may have, like others constantly do, try to find ways to really work with the Ss that are interested (especially outside the classroom). In fact try hard to find ways to motivate a few of the unmotivated as well. Some (not all) are unmotivated due to years of UNMOTIVATED TEACHERS (both Thai and foreign.

Trust me, as a teacher, it only takes one light bulb moment from a student to make your whole week/month feel worthwhile. Strive for those moments in Thailand.
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Pytheas



Joined: 15 Apr 2011
Posts: 13

PostPosted: Fri May 10, 2013 1:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Contract school hours tend to be 7:30 to 4:00 when advertised. In reality they may be sign in before 8:00am assembly and sign out after 3:30, you may only have 2 teaching hours in the meantime. It's often a good idea to get an apartment across the road from the school so signing in/out is no hassle. You also get days/weeks when you are technically working but there is no work due to term finished or kids off somewhere, but you still have to sign in/sign out so can't go out of town for the day or week.
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ArtHay



Joined: 17 Apr 2011
Posts: 14

PostPosted: Fri Aug 02, 2013 10:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I worked in a middle/high school for a year in a rural area and I found the students to be a mixed bag. They were separated into different levels which roughly corresponded to their ability. For example there were 8 M3 classes, M3-1, M3-2, M3-3 and so on, the students in the first 3 levels were great to work with while those in the lower levels could be a challenge, to put it politely.

What was really shocking was the physical condition of the school, classrooms with holes in the walls, broken desks that were never replaced, a computer lad filled with broken computers from the 90s.
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plumpy nut



Joined: 12 Mar 2011
Posts: 586

PostPosted: Sat Aug 03, 2013 6:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

ArtHay wrote:
I worked in a middle/high school for a year in a rural area and I found the students to be a mixed bag. They were separated into different levels which roughly corresponded to their ability. For example there were 8 M3 classes, M3-1, M3-2, M3-3 and so on, the students in the first 3 levels were great to work with while those in the lower levels could be a challenge, to put it politely


The private school I worked at separated the students out into high level, mediocre, and bottom of the barrel groups also. From what I can gather the reasons were unethical by Western standards. High level students had better English educations because the parents were more willing to pay for it. This figured into why the school was willing to segregate the students, the parents were willing to pay for it. The problem is to cut costs, or to hold up a farce that the kids were being given the standard good education, the materials were the same from class to class. Students that couldn't speak a word of English were given advanced level materials, very dysfunctional.

The school worked for the students that had any interest in English, and felt a need for it, and also had the readiness for the material . As far as the others the English education was a farce. For the mediocre and bottom of the barrel classes there was still students who you could teach and would listen to you. You had to reach out to them, usually with a microphone.

ArtHay wrote:
What was really shocking was the physical condition of the school, classrooms with holes in the walls, broken desks that were never replaced, a computer lad filled with broken computers from the 90s.


I worked briefly at a school in shit hole Lopburi (do not ever get a job in that city) that was generally in the same condition. The principle would occasionally tell me how good the school was and how privileged the students were to be there. However the private school I worked at the classrooms were much better and air conditioned.

At Lopburi I was promised free accommodation. What I got was a apartment that was comparable to an abandoned motel, only it had airconditioning and running water. Laughing Yes newbies please go to Lopburi.
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Kitkat Biriyani



Joined: 10 Jul 2013
Posts: 51
Location: New Venkatanarasimharajuvaripea, Missouri, USA, Q!Q!QQQ!!!

PostPosted: Sat Aug 03, 2013 3:00 pm    Post subject: Can't even torrrrrrkagoodgame, where's Nobski...... Reply with quote

principally one needs a good principal then, with good principles

have a break, have a ..........
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plumpy nut



Joined: 12 Mar 2011
Posts: 586

PostPosted: Mon Aug 05, 2013 5:57 am    Post subject: Re: Can't even torrrrrrkagoodgame, where's Nobski...... Reply with quote

Kitkat Biriyani wrote:
principally one needs a good principal then, with good principles

have a break, have a ..........


Private schools are out to make money that's it (except for the 1st tier international schools). They have no morals in the Western sense. They perpetuate the idea that the certificate the children get is better because of the name, school building, amount of money the parents have to pay etc.
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