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EU Blue Card? (for Americans or other non EU folks)

 
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Mojoski



Joined: 03 May 2009
Posts: 170

PostPosted: Thu Nov 21, 2013 8:53 pm    Post subject: EU Blue Card? (for Americans or other non EU folks) Reply with quote

I have just read online that Poland began accepting the EU Blue Card (work permit) on June 12, 2012. Apparently, what you need is this: 1. professional qualifications 2. contract from an employer that pays at least 1.5 times the average income in the country

There is a UK consulting fim that will review your situation for 50 pounds ($75) and tell you if it's doable. I don't know how much they charge beyond that to actually shepherd your paperwork through. The Blue Card can be good for up to two years and can be renewed.

I'm wondering if anyone here has done this or knows more about it than I do. I do have a potential company since my former colleague (working for them now) recommended me, and years ago, I used to work for a school this one bought out, and I think they pay enough to qualify.

Thanks for any info. Very Happy
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delphian-domine



Joined: 11 Mar 2011
Posts: 501

PostPosted: Thu Nov 21, 2013 10:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'd be pretty shocked if you could find a school willing to hire you from abroad for a salary of at least 5635zl as a teacher. They would be on the books for nearly 9000zl a month - which would be highly unlikely outside of international schools.

Anyway, the EU Blue Card is a waste of time in Poland as Poland has an open approach to immigration anyway. If they can get the Urzad Pracy to issue a work permit, then you can get a residence permit.
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scottie1113



Joined: 25 Oct 2004
Posts: 340
Location: Gdansk

PostPosted: Thu Nov 21, 2013 10:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Which I've done through my school for the last 6+ years. It's not difficult at all.
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Master Shake



Joined: 03 Nov 2006
Posts: 917
Location: Itabashi, Tokyo, Japan

PostPosted: Fri Nov 22, 2013 9:14 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

scottie1113 wrote:
Which I've done through my school for the last 6+ years. It's not difficult at all.
I've applied for a residence permit successfully 3 times in Warsaw.

It's always proven to be a long, arduous process with a huge list of documents that are required. The worst part is that immigration has always asked for several additional documents, some of which I had already given them.

And they always issued the residence permit well after the deadline, causing me to be stuck in 'visa-less limbo' a couple times for a few weeks.

Scott, it's easier for you because your school provides more support, and maybe the urząd in Gdansk is slightly less picky, but 'not difficult at all' is not how I would describe it, especially if you don't speak Polish.
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Louisdf



Joined: 05 Feb 2013
Posts: 8

PostPosted: Fri Nov 22, 2013 7:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Master Shake wrote:
scottie1113 wrote:
Which I've done through my school for the last 6+ years. It's not difficult at all.
I've applied for a residence permit successfully 3 times in Warsaw.

It's always proven to be a long, arduous process with a huge list of documents that are required. The worst part is that immigration has always asked for several additional documents, some of which I had already given them.

And they always issued the residence permit well after the deadline, causing me to be stuck in 'visa-less limbo' a couple times for a few weeks.

Scott, it's easier for you because your school provides more support, and maybe the urząd in Gdansk is slightly less picky, but 'not difficult at all' is not how I would describe it, especially if you don't speak Polish.

Well, would you expect the immigration office in New York/Chicago to have Polish speakers?
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scottie1113



Joined: 25 Oct 2004
Posts: 340
Location: Gdansk

PostPosted: Fri Nov 22, 2013 8:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Master Shake wrote:
scottie1113 wrote:
Which I've done through my school for the last 6+ years. It's not difficult at all.
I've applied for a residence permit successfully 3 times in Warsaw.

It's always proven to be a long, arduous process with a huge list of documents that are required. The worst part is that immigration has always asked for several additional documents, some of which I had already given them.

And they always issued the residence permit well after the deadline, causing me to be stuck in 'visa-less limbo' a couple times for a few weeks.

Scott, it's easier for you because your school provides more support, and maybe the urząd in Gdansk is slightly less picky, but 'not difficult at all' is not how I would describe it, especially if you don't speak Polish.


I didn't say it wasn't along arduous process with mountains of documents required, nor did I say that they didn't ask for additional documents which I had already provided. I didn't say it wasn't a pain in the ass, which it is, only that it wasn't difficult. I just kept jumping through the hoops. One thing my office has done in the last two applications was to stamp my passport giving me permission to remain in Poland until I got my decsion, which usually happened a week or two later. The actual card rakes about 3-4 months to arrive. Welcome in Poland.

My Polish isn't great but I use it when I'm in the urzad although most of the people there speak English. True, Bell does provide support-Darek has been great-but I could have done it by myself with the same result. The key is having a work permit which Bell always gets for me. Without it, you'd run into the same wall that ecocks did.
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Master Shake



Joined: 03 Nov 2006
Posts: 917
Location: Itabashi, Tokyo, Japan

PostPosted: Fri Nov 22, 2013 10:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

To me, "long, arduous and pain-in-the-ass" = difficult. Don't forget that there's no guarantee that they'll give you the card after you jump through the hoops either.

Louisdf wrote:

Well, would you expect the immigration office in New York/Chicago to have Polish speakers?
That's not comparing apples to apples. We're talking about the immigration office in Poland, whose job it is to deal with foreigners from all over the world. English is naturally going to be the lingua franca.

As for the USA, I'd wager many offices in the Southwest offer services in Spanish.

Anyway, to their credit, the people who deal with foreign applications in Warsaw immigration usually do speak some English.
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dragonpiwo



Joined: 04 Mar 2013
Posts: 654
Location: Berlin

PostPosted: Wed Nov 27, 2013 7:44 am    Post subject: and.. Reply with quote

When I was doing my Karta Pobytu, there was a woman who spoke English in the Poznan office on Plac Wolnosci and she's still there. In the ZUS/NIP offices, no-one spoke a word of English. The amount of paperwork this place needs from fellow EU citizens is astounding. I'd hate to be from outside the EU in the respect.
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dragonpiwo



Joined: 04 Mar 2013
Posts: 654
Location: Berlin

PostPosted: Wed Nov 27, 2013 7:52 am    Post subject: and Reply with quote

The banks are no better. I sat down with the bank manager who knows me yesterday to do a standing order. I gave him a copy of my passport page, UK photo ID driving licence, DB bank card, EHIC card AND HE KNOWS ME. Wouldn't do anything without my passport. So, back today. That experience is a microcosm of doing stuff in Poland in general. No flexibility at all and a myriad of pointless, stupid rules that aren't relevant or reciprocal in the new EU Poland.
It is also still very much a police state.
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delphian-domine



Joined: 11 Mar 2011
Posts: 501

PostPosted: Wed Nov 27, 2013 6:40 pm    Post subject: Re: and Reply with quote

dragonpiwo wrote:
The banks are no better. I sat down with the bank manager who knows me yesterday to do a standing order. I gave him a copy of my passport page, UK photo ID driving licence, DB bank card, EHIC card AND HE KNOWS ME. Wouldn't do anything without my passport. So, back today. That experience is a microcosm of doing stuff in Poland in general. No flexibility at all and a myriad of pointless, stupid rules that aren't relevant or reciprocal in the new EU Poland.


Why should they change the rules just because our stupid country won't give us an ID card? One reason Poland doesn't have problems with identity theft is because it's an ID card or passport - nothing else. The UK on the other hand has huge problems because of "flexibility'.

At the end of the day, everyone knows that in Poland, you need your passport or ID card to do stuff in the bank. Is it that difficult to bring your passport if needs be? (having said that, I don't even remember the last time I sat down in the bank).

Quote:
It is also still very much a police state.


We're in Poland now, not Libya.
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Mojoski



Joined: 03 May 2009
Posts: 170

PostPosted: Wed Nov 27, 2013 8:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for the responses. I've decided to just apply and tell them that they would need to sponsor my work permit if they hire me.

As for police state, the only contact with police in four years that I remember was when we were having some beers on the pavement before entering the Sting concert, as were dozens of other people, and a cop approached one of our party and suggested he keep his beer under his coat. Laughing
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Master Shake



Joined: 03 Nov 2006
Posts: 917
Location: Itabashi, Tokyo, Japan

PostPosted: Thu Nov 28, 2013 1:02 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Mojoski wrote:
Thanks for the responses. I've decided to just apply and tell them that they would need to sponsor my work permit if they hire me.

As for police state, the only contact with police in four years that I remember was when we were having some beers on the pavement before entering the Sting concert, as were dozens of other people, and a cop approached one of our party and suggested he keep his beer under his coat. Laughing

Polish cops can be remarkably cool if they like you, get caught up in the moment, or think you will comply without any further persuasion.

I've never had a problem with them in the 5+ years I've been here. Been stopped half a dozen times, usually for nothing - or jaywalking.
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delphian-domine



Joined: 11 Mar 2011
Posts: 501

PostPosted: Thu Nov 28, 2013 9:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Master Shake wrote:
Polish cops can be remarkably cool if they like you, get caught up in the moment, or think you will comply without any further persuasion.

I've never had a problem with them in the 5+ years I've been here. Been stopped half a dozen times, usually for nothing - or jaywalking.


I've been stopped...hmm, three times for jaywalking and never paid a thing. Same with speeding - I was stopped once, and they were as good as gold about the whole thing - they explained that they couldn't let me off with it because of the anti-corruption laws, but they showed me the list of speeds/fines/points and made it clear that it was all entirely fair. They even apologised for not being able to give me the mandat to pay later.

They even let a friend of mine go who was clearly absolutely wasted - they took him to a taxi nearby and told him to piss off home. He was being a right pain in the ass - they would've been completely justified in arresting him, but they didn't.

Even one night when we had a rather loud party at my friend's flat, they turned up about 2am and simply asked that we finish the party because of complaints by the neighbours. Fair enough, I'd say.

Wonder why he thinks it's a police state. Could it be that they don't have much tolerance for arrogant foreigners?

Even when I've been stopped on the border, they've never given me any bother - it's always been professional and to the point.
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ecocks



Joined: 06 Nov 2007
Posts: 855
Location: Gdansk, Poland

PostPosted: Thu Nov 28, 2013 10:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

delphian-domine wrote:
Master Shake wrote:
Polish cops can be remarkably cool if they like you, get caught up in the moment, or think you will comply without any further persuasion.

I've never had a problem with them in the 5+ years I've been here. Been stopped half a dozen times, usually for nothing - or jaywalking.


I've been stopped...hmm, three times for jaywalking and never paid a thing. Same with speeding - I was stopped once, and they were as good as gold about the whole thing - they explained that they couldn't let me off with it because of the anti-corruption laws, but they showed me the list of speeds/fines/points and made it clear that it was all entirely fair. They even apologised for not being able to give me the mandat to pay later.

They even let a friend of mine go who was clearly absolutely wasted - they took him to a taxi nearby and told him to piss off home. He was being a right pain in the ass - they would've been completely justified in arresting him, but they didn't.

Even one night when we had a rather loud party at my friend's flat, they turned up about 2am and simply asked that we finish the party because of complaints by the neighbours. Fair enough, I'd say.

Wonder why he thinks it's a police state. Could it be that they don't have much tolerance for arrogant foreigners?

Even when I've been stopped on the border, they've never given me any bother - it's always been professional and to the point.


I've had no trouble with them except for the one jaywalking episode which resulted in a warning. A couple of other times, they have been very helpful with directions. If I wanted a police state atmosphere I would move back to California or schedule some time in Heathrow. (I am so NOT Looking forward to the coming 16 hour layover!)

The police were far more worrisome in Ukraine and Azerbaijan due to their apathy and generally low level of education. I knew a few expats who went out of their way to push the cops' buttons and even then it took some real effort on their part to get arrested.
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