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Working at Polish universities
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ecocks



Joined: 06 Nov 2007
Posts: 780
Location: Gdansk, Poland

PostPosted: Mon Oct 07, 2013 4:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Master Shake wrote:
dynow wrote:
there are plenty of TEFL'ers on this forum that claim to make up 10,000zl/month or more and they didn't spend a day in a graduate level and certainly not a doctorate level college program.
Not true. Some of the higher-earning tefl'ers have masters degrees (I know several). Don't forget about DELTA which is also post-graduate qualification.


dynow wrote:
Imagine a 25-26 year old TEFL'er with a few years' experience bringing home 5,000zl more a month than a 32 year old PhD that just slaved through over 10 years of uni.
I think this speaks to the quality of higher education in Poland compared to the USA, the UK & Australia - i.e. it isn't that consistently high in Poland yet. In many universities anyone who puts in the bare min. can pass.

The rift between native tefl'er pay and local professor pay is is in no way unique to Poland. In Thailand Thai professors made a fraction of what we tefl'ers did.

At a glance, it seems unfair, but then again it's pretty much forbidden to fail anyone in Thailand. Who knows if someone with a 'masters' in a subject knows their a$$ from a hole in the ground? I wouldn't put much stock in any degree from a random uni. in SE Asia.


Everyone wants to believe their situations are unique but they rarely are.

Pay, working conditions, hiring practices, student focus, parental involvement, yada, yada, yada, all look pretty much right in the normal range here.
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mitsui



Joined: 10 Jun 2007
Posts: 463
Location: Kawasaki

PostPosted: Mon Oct 07, 2013 8:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I would say get your doctorate and know Polish.
Knowing Polish could be more important.

I knew a professor at Warsaw University.
I doesn`t hurt that he grew up in England to Polish parents.
In Lodz he taught at the university there with only a MA.
So he was the perfect candidate.

I worked for a year at a university in Poland but lost my job since I am American. They wanted to have people from the EU do the teaching.
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dynow



Joined: 07 Nov 2006
Posts: 985

PostPosted: Mon Oct 07, 2013 12:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

delphian-domine wrote:
Quote:


Where are you getting the 10 years figure from? In Poland, it's 8 years, much of which isn't slavery.


8 years for a PhD? and you don't have to work your pants off to get it? 26-27 years old.... a doctor? sheesh. well, i guess every country's different.

note to self: send my children to American universities. money well spent.
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ecocks



Joined: 06 Nov 2007
Posts: 780
Location: Gdansk, Poland

PostPosted: Mon Oct 07, 2013 12:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Uh, yeah, 8 years is pretty much in the range for the United States.The average for all disciplines is 9 years according to DoE. I have a 26 year old friend completing her PhD in Computer Science at University of Arizona this Spring. She's got multiple six-digit offers in hand from the major tech companies. While working in the US education system I knew dozens of EdD and PhD holders in education and psychology, plus my own grad school years where I met countless DBAs and PhDs while walking around the Universities in the States. Many of the students work full-time (especially in Education and Psych), choosing to do coursework in the summer and p/t in Fall and Spring semesters.

Comparing across the pond is particularly difficult due to to varying methodologies and program philosophies. The American system utilizes many of their graduate students to teach lower level courses. My first university-level teaching experience was Intro to Business, then Into to Data Communications and subbing for Professors in Marketing and Management classes. When enrollments go up they turn to grad students to pick up extra courses and work with you to scale back your course-load and project timelines. This actually leads to universities formally suggesting grad students slow down their coursework in favor of increased teaching activity and there are also disciplines where the research grants and faculty programs interfere with the timing of the student's project. Stipends at some universities for teaching 2 courses per semester run $30,000 and include the tuition breaks with summer and Continuing Education Department work bringing in additional income.

Additional factors of note are the background the student comes from (programs lengthen if foundation courses are required due to crossovers between say, Engineering and Business), full/part-time program participation, research projects leading to dissertations and the track the student is working towards. American programs tend to be more diverse and broader-based while European programs tend to be more focused.
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delphian-domine



Joined: 11 Mar 2011
Posts: 338

PostPosted: Mon Oct 07, 2013 3:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

dynow wrote:
8 years for a PhD? and you don't have to work your pants off to get it? 26-27 years old.... a doctor? sheesh. well, i guess every country's different.


In the UK, it would be normal to complete a PhD by the time you're 26 - leave school at 18 for university, 3 year BA, 1 year MA, 3 year PhD full time - job done. In Poland, add a year to the leaving age and add a year to the MA, but still the normal way of doing things.

Quote:
note to self: send my children to American universities. money well spent.


Depends what they do, I guess. If they pick a humanities subject, they might as well go study in the cheapest credible place.
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PeterParvo



Joined: 18 Dec 2011
Posts: 98

PostPosted: Sat Nov 30, 2013 3:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Mike from MI wrote:
Thanks for your answers. Do temporary instructors get free tuition if they want to get a degree? I see that some Polish universities offer graduate programs in which English is the language of instruction. Do Polish universities have assistantships like American universities do?


I did an MA at a Polish university while working at that university and have gotten more miles out of that degree. I didn't pay a dime. My current job in the U.S. and previous job in KSA would not have been possible without it. Thank you Adam Mickiewicz.
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