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Job Offer with N Kyoiku

 
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Aelric



Joined: 16 Dec 2009
Posts: 66

PostPosted: Thu Jan 09, 2014 4:09 pm    Post subject: Job Offer with N Kyoiku Reply with quote

Dunno if it was good timing or not, but I've got an interview from overseas lined up with this company. Seems the standard 250,000Y pay, company car, 60,000Y rent and 6-7 50 minutes lessons, all ages but mostly little kids situation.

It seems that since I'm in California, I shouldn't be picky until I am in Japan and I can interview for better work in person after my contract.

Having worked in Thailand the past three years, this seems like a decent set-up to me, not so different from set up in Korea before. More work, sure, but WAY more pay (Thailand average is about $800 - $1000). What say you? Decent company, decent starter job for Japan?
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rtm



Joined: 13 Apr 2007
Posts: 398
Location: US

PostPosted: Thu Jan 09, 2014 9:02 pm    Post subject: Re: Job Offer with N Kyoiku Reply with quote

Aelric wrote:
Dunno if it was good timing or not, but I've got an interview from overseas lined up with this company. Seems the standard 250,000Y pay, company car, 60,000Y rent and 6-7 50 minutes lessons, all ages but mostly little kids situation.

Sounds like a decent offer. Not the best, but definitely not the worst.

You mention 60,000 for rent. Is the apartment owned by the company? Do you need to pay any key money or deposit? Is it furnished? There's no right answer -- just possible set-up costs to take into consideration.

You mention a "company car". Would you be able to use that in your personal time also? If so, will they pay for the shaken (bi-annual inspection, which can range from around 80,000-200,000, depending on the kind of car and its condition).

Do they pay for any of your health insurance? It won't cost much your first year, but it will be a good chunk of change from your 2nd year on (the amount you pay is based on your previous year's income). I think most employers should pay for 1/2 of the premium.

Some of these things might be good to save until you are actually offered the job (rather than asking during the interview), but they would be good to find out at some point.

Quote:
More work, sure, but WAY more pay (Thailand average is about $800 - $1000).

Yes, but also a different cost of living. How good this offer is will also depend on where in Japan it is -- if it's in Tokyo, it might be just barely enough to live on. If it's out in the countryside, then you'll have more left over after the basic necessities are paid.
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Pitarou



Joined: 16 Nov 2009
Posts: 896
Location: Narita, Japan

PostPosted: Thu Jan 09, 2014 9:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

With the car, it sounds good.

The rent seems a little high, but that depends on the condition, location, deposits, and so on. Make sure you know more about these things -- especially their policy on teachers who want to move out -- before you formally accept a job offer.

There are two kinds of health insurance you might be offered:

1. shakai hoken (worker's health insurance)

2. kokumin kenko hoken (social health insurance)

You must be on one of these schemes. If you're not, renewing your visa could prove very expensive. Any private insurance you have should be considered as a supplement to these policies, not a substitute.

shakai hoken is best. In principle, every full-time worker should be enrolled in the shakai hoken, but the definition of "full-time" gets stretched to the point of absurdity. This is arranged through your employer, who pays half of your premium. It covers you and your dependents. (There are other schemes run by NPOs that are recognised as equivalent to shakai hoken, but these are rare.)

kokumin kenko hoken is the fallback for those who aren't on shakai hoken. You get it through city hall. Your premium is based on your previous year's salary in Japan so, for your first year, it's very cheap.
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JimSwill



Joined: 30 Oct 2009
Posts: 12
Location: Middle

PostPosted: Fri Jan 10, 2014 2:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I took a job with this company a year or so ago.

It was, without a doubt, the worst experience I've had teaching overseas.

I actually managed to last there about a week, though I considered walking after about an hour of entering the school.

First, the apartment is not furnished at all. There is a washing machine.

They requested that I come a few days early, as I was living in a different area of Japan, so I obliged.

When I opened the door to the place I noticed there was nothing.

So, I asked where I might buy some bedding, so I could at least sleep on something other than a bare wood floor and the trainer said to me he didn't really know. Then he took off to teach for the day and he said he'd be back to take me out for some ramen with the other teachers later on.

So I spent the day walking around Toyohashi looking around. Luckily I came across a place after three hours of searching. Then I packed all the stuff back to the apartment. Then I noticed a German Sheppard chained outside the neighbor's building (it barked constantly).

when the 'trainer' got back he looked surprised to see I found bedding. He actually asked me where I found it...

I told him I wouldn't be coming out because I was too exhausted from walking around all day. Then I shut the door and would have went to sleep, except that he lived next door and you could hear him and all the other teachers geeking out all night...

That was day one.

I haven't even started with the school. Want to hear more?
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Aelric



Joined: 16 Dec 2009
Posts: 66

PostPosted: Fri Jan 10, 2014 9:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

JimSwill wrote:
I took a job with this company a year or so ago.

It was, without a doubt, the worst experience I've had teaching overseas.

I actually managed to last there about a week, though I considered walking after about an hour of entering the school.

First, the apartment is not furnished at all. There is a washing machine.

They requested that I come a few days early, as I was living in a different area of Japan, so I obliged.

When I opened the door to the place I noticed there was nothing.

So, I asked where I might buy some bedding, so I could at least sleep on something other than a bare wood floor and the trainer said to me he didn't really know. Then he took off to teach for the day and he said he'd be back to take me out for some ramen with the other teachers later on.

So I spent the day walking around Toyohashi looking around. Luckily I came across a place after three hours of searching. Then I packed all the stuff back to the apartment. Then I noticed a German Sheppard chained outside the neighbor's building (it barked constantly).

when the 'trainer' got back he looked surprised to see I found bedding. He actually asked me where I found it...

I told him I wouldn't be coming out because I was too exhausted from walking around all day. Then I shut the door and would have went to sleep, except that he lived next door and you could hear him and all the other teachers geeking out all night...

That was day one.

I haven't even started with the school. Want to hear more?


Yes, honestly, I do. Particularly, what year was this? I've found another review of the school, again, generally not positive, however it made no mention of poor condition in the apartment, just that the curriculum was asinine, which, after 3 years in Thailand, is not a problem.

http://www.glassdoor.com/Reviews/Employee-Review-N-Kyoiku-Nakazawa-Juku-RVW1080612.htm


here are the deets on what they offer via email:

Work related

5 days work 2 days off per week ( Sat and Sun are days off )
40 hours work per week
Schedules are set at the beginning of each school year so you will get to see the same students week to week.
6-7 lessons per day
1 week holiday in May and August
2 weeks holiday in Christmas

Benefits

Visa sponsorship
250000/yen monthly salary training period 5000 yen/day ( 2 weeks )
5000 / yen monthly transportation ( gas )
company car (teachers are required to obtain an international drivers license before arriving in Japan)
company accommodation ( 55,000 ~ 57,500 yen/month )
includes parking fee, fire insurance and car insurance

Lesson related

Each lesson 50 minutes
Kids, Junior 1, 2, 3, levels are structured (Kids = Kindergarten, Junior 1 = Grades 1&2, etc..)
( pair teaching style )
Returnees to Japan from living abroad, Junior high school, High school, Adult lessons are pre-structured
Teachers are required to prepare the lesson plans for those students, ( materials are provided)



I will inquire about the car inspection, furnishings and other issues brought up here on the forum. I am also on stage 3 for a westgate application, so it's hopefully not my only option.
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Aelric



Joined: 16 Dec 2009
Posts: 66

PostPosted: Fri Jan 10, 2014 9:10 am    Post subject: Re: Job Offer with N Kyoiku Reply with quote

rtm wrote:
Aelric wrote:
Dunno if it was good timing or not, but I've got an interview from overseas lined up with this company. Seems the standard 250,000Y pay, company car, 60,000Y rent and 6-7 50 minutes lessons, all ages but mostly little kids situation.

Sounds like a decent offer. Not the best, but definitely not the worst.

You mention 60,000 for rent. Is the apartment owned by the company? Do you need to pay any key money or deposit? Is it furnished? There's no right answer -- just possible set-up costs to take into consideration.

You mention a "company car". Would you be able to use that in your personal time also? If so, will they pay for the shaken (bi-annual inspection, which can range from around 80,000-200,000, depending on the kind of car and its condition).

Do they pay for any of your health insurance? It won't cost much your first year, but it will be a good chunk of change from your 2nd year on (the amount you pay is based on your previous year's income). I think most employers should pay for 1/2 of the premium.

Some of these things might be good to save until you are actually offered the job (rather than asking during the interview), but they would be good to find out at some point.

Quote:
More work, sure, but WAY more pay (Thailand average is about $800 - $1000).

Yes, but also a different cost of living. How good this offer is will also depend on where in Japan it is -- if it's in Tokyo, it might be just barely enough to live on. If it's out in the countryside, then you'll have more left over after the basic necessities are paid.


I understand the cost of living, however, with the upper ceiling of what I take home so much higher than Thailand, I believe, and everyone I ask agrees, that I could save in Japan more than the total I earned in Thailand. I live a fairly simple lifestyle, content with simple local food, cheap beer and I don't smoke (anymore). I'm not considering Japan for a lavish lifestyle, it's considering it because I want to spend a year or two saving while doing a job I'm qualified for. California looks down it's nose at EFL experience and the language schools only really hire grad students part time. It's rough for jobs in the US right now, and I'd rather not go from being a teacher to working at McDonald's or Walmart.

I sorta think the US is screwed anyway, so I may stay in Japan if I find an agreeable position. I've also considered China, returning to Korea or being daring and trying Oman or Dubai. Anything but SE Asia. I had well enough of that.
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HLJHLJ



Joined: 06 Oct 2009
Posts: 801

PostPosted: Fri Jan 10, 2014 10:33 am    Post subject: Re: Job Offer with N Kyoiku Reply with quote

Aelric wrote:

Quote:
More work, sure, but WAY more pay (Thailand average is about $800 - $1000).

I believe, and everyone I ask agrees, that I could save in Japan more than the total I earned in Thailand. I live a fairly simple lifestyle, content with simple local food, cheap beer and I don't smoke (anymore).


Hoping to save $800-$1,000 a month out of Y250k is beyond optimistic. Especially if you have to pay for the upkeep/maintenance of the car. Assuming it's not in Tokyo (because you don't usually need a car in Tokyo), you could maybe save something in your first year, but once the health insurance and city taxes kick in I can't see that you'd have much left after basic living expenses.

I suspect you are drastically underestimating how much a simple lifestyle and simple local food cost here. Also, bear in mind that a couple of years ago your Y250k was worth $3,250, now it's worth less than $2,400. So when people are telling you how much you can save, double check that they are basing it on the current situation, not how it used to be.
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Aelric



Joined: 16 Dec 2009
Posts: 66

PostPosted: Fri Jan 10, 2014 11:54 am    Post subject: Re: Job Offer with N Kyoiku Reply with quote

HLJHLJ wrote:
Aelric wrote:

Quote:
More work, sure, but WAY more pay (Thailand average is about $800 - $1000).

I believe, and everyone I ask agrees, that I could save in Japan more than the total I earned in Thailand. I live a fairly simple lifestyle, content with simple local food, cheap beer and I don't smoke (anymore).


Hoping to save $800-$1,000 a month out of Y250k is beyond optimistic. Especially if you have to pay for the upkeep/maintenance of the car. Assuming it's not in Tokyo (because you don't usually need a car in Tokyo), you could maybe save something in your first year, but once the health insurance and city taxes kick in I can't see that you'd have much left after basic living expenses.

I suspect you are drastically underestimating how much a simple lifestyle and simple local food cost here. Also, bear in mind that a couple of years ago your Y250k was worth $3,250, now it's worth less than $2,400. So when people are telling you how much you can save, double check that they are basing it on the current situation, not how it used to be.


Everyone said that when I was in Korea and I saved over 12K a year. Everyone said that in Thailand and I saved 3K every 6 months, more if the work was stable and program budgets didn't disappear mysteriously so often, thus laying me off almost every damned semester.

I don't doubt that Japan is expensive, hell, I'm sure I'll get sticker shock, but I'll be avoiding Tokyo, I'm not likely to travel much, I won't take the job or I'll quit on the spot if I have to pay for that car inspection mentioned above and I may only stay a year anyway, so the tax increases might not effect me much. Besides, aren't we supposed to receive our total pension back when we leave Japan? And I WILL leave Japan. I've no intent to retire there and would cap off at two years at most, as I did with Korea, would have with Thailand if I didn't get married and plan to in the future with China or Hong Kong after Japan.

I have a monastic lifestyle and only feel the urge to go out maybe once a month, and even then, it's usually just for a quite drink with a friend. I'm already married (Filipina living in Thailand for work) so I'm not going to go on dates. When and if I have time, I'll spend it looking and interviewing for better paying work. I'm also looking into China as an alternative if Japan is screwed. I'm not in a rush and I have options, I just want to come away from wherever I work with a bit of savings to put towards other things than just lifestyle.

That said, the whole point of this thread was to find out about this company. They sound awful and I'm less likely to accept the offer unless I don't hear from anyone else. I'm at stage 3 with Westgate right now, and another company has given me a callback since I posted this the other day.
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rtm



Joined: 13 Apr 2007
Posts: 398
Location: US

PostPosted: Fri Jan 10, 2014 12:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

JimSwill wrote:
First, the apartment is not furnished at all. There is a washing machine.

Did they tell you that it would be furnished? In Japan, most apartments come with nothing in them, and occupants need to provide everything, including stove, refrigerator, washing machine, hot water heater, and sometimes even light fixtures. Unless they told you that it would be furnished, I don't see this as something to get upset about.

Quote:
So, I asked where I might buy some bedding, so I could at least sleep on something other than a bare wood floor and the trainer said to me he didn't really know. Then he took off to teach for the day and he said he'd be back to take me out for some ramen with the other teachers later on.

So, they asked you to be an adult and take care of yourself. Sure, it would have been nice if they took you somewhere to get some essentials, but shouldn't be expected (unless, again, they told you that they would do so).

Quote:
Then I noticed a German Sheppard chained outside the neighbor's building (it barked constantly).

Is that somehow supposed to be the company's fault?

Quote:
I told him I wouldn't be coming out because I was too exhausted from walking around all day. Then I shut the door and would have went to sleep, except that he lived next door and you could hear him and all the other teachers geeking out all night...

That was day one.

After-hours socializing with co-workers is a big deal in Japan, and it sounds like you missed out on that. You could have chosen to go next door and get to know your new co-workers, but instead you chose to be a curmudgeon. They invited you, which was nice of them. They probably wanted to make you feel welcome.

Maybe there were negatives of the job itself, but what you've posted so far is pretty standard.
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HLJHLJ



Joined: 06 Oct 2009
Posts: 801

PostPosted: Fri Jan 10, 2014 5:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Aelric wrote:
I am also on stage 3 for a westgate application, so it's hopefully not my only option.


Be aware that Westgate do not like you bringing family with you. They won't help you with your wife's visa, and they won't let her live with you in their accommodation (and they may or may not be willing to let you live elsewhere).
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Pitarou



Joined: 16 Nov 2009
Posts: 896
Location: Narita, Japan

PostPosted: Fri Jan 10, 2014 6:24 pm    Post subject: Re: Job Offer with N Kyoiku Reply with quote

Aelric wrote:
rtm wrote:
Aelric wrote:
Dunno if it was good timing or not, but I've got an interview from overseas lined up with this company. Seems the standard 250,000Y pay, company car, 60,000Y rent and 6-7 50 minutes lessons, all ages but mostly little kids situation.

Sounds like a decent offer. Not the best, but definitely not the worst.

You mention 60,000 for rent. Is the apartment owned by the company? Do you need to pay any key money or deposit? Is it furnished? There's no right answer -- just possible set-up costs to take into consideration.

You mention a "company car". Would you be able to use that in your personal time also? If so, will they pay for the shaken (bi-annual inspection, which can range from around 80,000-200,000, depending on the kind of car and its condition).

Do they pay for any of your health insurance? It won't cost much your first year, but it will be a good chunk of change from your 2nd year on (the amount you pay is based on your previous year's income). I think most employers should pay for 1/2 of the premium.

Some of these things might be good to save until you are actually offered the job (rather than asking during the interview), but they would be good to find out at some point.

Quote:
More work, sure, but WAY more pay (Thailand average is about $800 - $1000).

Yes, but also a different cost of living. How good this offer is will also depend on where in Japan it is -- if it's in Tokyo, it might be just barely enough to live on. If it's out in the countryside, then you'll have more left over after the basic necessities are paid.


I understand the cost of living, however, with the upper ceiling of what I take home so much higher than Thailand, I believe, and everyone I ask agrees, that I could save in Japan more than the total I earned in Thailand. I live a fairly simple lifestyle, content with simple local food, cheap beer and I don't smoke (anymore). I'm not considering Japan for a lavish lifestyle, it's considering it because I want to spend a year or two saving while doing a job I'm qualified for. California looks down it's nose at EFL experience and the language schools only really hire grad students part time. It's rough for jobs in the US right now, and I'd rather not go from being a teacher to working at McDonald's or Walmart.

I sorta think the US is screwed anyway, so I may stay in Japan if I find an agreeable position. I've also considered China, returning to Korea or being daring and trying Oman or Dubai. Anything but SE Asia. I had well enough of that.

I'm with Aelric on this one.

I actually think Japan is even more screwed, but it doesn't look like you're planning to get tied down here, so you don't need to worry too much about that..
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