Site Search:
 
TEFL International Supports Dave's ESL Cafe
TEFL Courses, TESOL Course, English Teaching Jobs - TEFL International
Job Discussion Forums Forum Index Job Discussion Forums
"The Internet's Meeting Place for ESL/EFL Students and Teachers from Around the World!"
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

Private schools to give learning English more attention

 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Job Discussion Forums Forum Index -> Saudi Arabia
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
nomad soul



Joined: 31 Jan 2010
Posts: 3840
Location: Terra firma

PostPosted: Thu Mar 20, 2014 7:06 am    Post subject: Private schools to give learning English more attention Reply with quote

Private schools to pay more attention to teaching English
By Afshan Aziz, Arab News | 20 March 2014
Source: http://www.arabnews.com/news/543056

JEDDAH---Several private schools in the Kingdom will be teaching English along with Arabic and Islamic Studies to Saudi and Arab students in order to prepare students for higher education. According to school officials, three in 10 students leave school with basic English skills and the rest are tasked with taking English courses in order to be able to continue their higher education abroad.

Al-Baraem Private School in Jeddah has begun offering the American diploma course in an effort to keep up with other international schools. "The course has been designed to teach English to students from elementary to high school,” said Huda Farooqi, the school’s director. “Moreover, we have appointed teachers who are native or frequent English speakers in the American diploma section so they communicate with students only in English. Our aim is to provide an international education of the highest standard and to facilitate the entry of students into world-class universities across the globe. The language issue has been a major concern for many parents,” she said. “It is important to balance the Arabic and English curricula. Schools should consider Arabic-language classes so students can grasp the fundamentals, but these classes should always be accompanied by English.”

Many other private schools have introduced English courses in their curriculum. The majority of schools have launched this program exclusively for Saudi students. "This is a much-needed initiative since most international schools do not accept Saudi students,” Omar Abdullah, a student counselor, told Arab News. “It is imperative for Arabic language students to be bilingual in order to make it in today’s world.”

“This initiative from schools should be encouraged by parents and students,” said Hanan Baham, an English teacher. “It is necessary for students to have a basic understanding of English to meet admission requirements for the degrees they want to pursue.”

(End of article)
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
LPKSA



Joined: 02 Mar 2014
Posts: 107

PostPosted: Thu Mar 20, 2014 7:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Dubai has been doing this for some time, and since the economic' downturn, many teachers have been headed there to work in their elementary/primary school system as English teachers. It has become so competitive to land these kinds of positions that they now require applicants to hold government certification from their home state/country which permits them to teach in the elementary/public school systems therein. An MA in English or TESOL doesn't match up to the state/country certification, from what I have gathered through reading these listings and talking with others in the field.

I wonder if this will be the case here in KSA within the next five to ten years.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
veiledsentiments



Joined: 20 Feb 2003
Posts: 15956
Location: USA

PostPosted: Thu Mar 20, 2014 4:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It has always been true in the UAE and Oman that the English of the students that came from the private "international" schools was superior to the students from the public schools. ADEC is trying to change that in Abu Dhabi, but I haven't heard much about it being done in Dubai (probably letting AD do the experiment). All the discussion here has been about Abu Dhabi positions - through recruiters like TeachAway.

The better International Schools have always tended to require teachers to be certified from their home countries, but it has been a new requirement for public school teachers... and thus far only Abu Dhabi seems to be doing it.

I don't believe Oman or the other Emirates are requiring it. Although the new attempt in the UAE to get rid of Foundations programs suggests that it will need to spread around the country soon.

If it works, the KSA will probably attempt the same changes.

VS
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
SENTINEL33



Joined: 19 Jan 2014
Posts: 112
Location: Bahrain

PostPosted: Thu Mar 20, 2014 10:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

veiledsentiments wrote:


If it works, the KSA will probably attempt the same changes.

VS


....except that KSA will run into the same problems its always had with hiring western faculty: The vast majority of K-12 certified English teachers and ESL teachers, at least in the USA, are female. This annoying fact causes all kinds complications which we need not detail here.

......another complication is this: most states require a certified teacher to be "in the system" for a lot of purposes: retirement calculations, validity of work experience, updating your credentials and so on. You can work in another state within the USA, but once you leave our hallowed shores, it's like you don't exist as far as the state certification agency is concerned.

In only a very few cases (teaching in the military dependents' school system overseas....Japan and Germany mostly), will your state recognize your time in service, mainly because these schools are, by law, members of primary and secondary school certifiying agencies in the US. Anyplace else, including KSA and the Gulf, you've dropped off the map and your teaching time there will not be recognized or counted.

Most Mid East employers aren't even aware of this angle which is one of the main reasons they have such a tough time getting USA teachers.

It's the same with the "professorial" class. What USA professor is going to jeopardize his "tenure" at some university by taking a side trip to the MidEast? Or jeopardize his hiring possibilities by being overseas? No one is going to hire you while you're teaching in the Gulf or the MidEast. What about those all important "personal contacts" or research facilities and so on?

You (generic) can fantasize all you want, habeebee, but it just ain't gonna happen....no way.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
veiledsentiments



Joined: 20 Feb 2003
Posts: 15956
Location: USA

PostPosted: Fri Mar 21, 2014 2:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

A similar thing happens at both ends of that scale - professors and licensed US teachers. It tends to be older individuals who have retired early or left the field back home for whatever reason (perhaps because they realize that they will never achieve tenure - or be able to save on US public school salaries). They come to the Gulf for a few years to pad their retirement funds. They come at a point where tenure or US rules are irrelevant to them.

Nothing wrong with that... very sensible actually. And ADEC has hired lots of US teachers over the last few years. The professors are all up and down the Gulf.

VS
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
plumpy nut



Joined: 12 Mar 2011
Posts: 759

PostPosted: Fri Mar 21, 2014 6:17 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

LPKSA wrote:


I wonder if this will be the case here in KSA within the next five to ten years.


Although there are people here that are licensed in their home countries(which is what you're talking about), the answer is no. Most people that are licensed are going to use their license for better jobs regardless if the pay in Saudi Arabia might be a little more. For instance there is Dubai (as already mentioned, Israel, Taiwan and more. The KSA wouldn't be able to get enough English teachers if they required licensing without the usual shenanigans, the illegal visas, the SACM making allowances for Americans (fine with me) etc.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
veiledsentiments



Joined: 20 Feb 2003
Posts: 15956
Location: USA

PostPosted: Fri Mar 21, 2014 4:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I agree Plumpy... I can't see that they could possibly get enough teachers, even if they significantly raised the pay in the public schools.

VS
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Job Discussion Forums Forum Index -> Saudi Arabia All times are GMT
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


This page is maintained by the one and only Dave Sperling.
Contact Dave's ESL Cafe
Copyright © 2011 Dave Sperling. All Rights Reserved.

Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2002 phpBB Group

Road2Spain - TEFL and Spanish with one year student visa
EBC