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New laws regarding foreigners in the Czech Republic
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MrWright



Joined: 27 Feb 2008
Posts: 118
Location: Arizona

PostPosted: Sat Mar 29, 2014 4:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Any update on this? I'm an American licensed teacher looking to teach in Europe, and it seems the CR is my only real option. Am I wrong in this? Is the CR still an option for Americans? One of the posts said to get your degree notarized and apostilled. Do I need both on the same copy of my degree? Or should I get one copy apostilled and another notarized? Same question for transcripts, teaching certificate and so on. I would appreciate any help/input.
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spiral78



Joined: 05 Apr 2004
Posts: 9375
Location: On a Short Leash

PostPosted: Sat Mar 29, 2014 7:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Czech Rep, Slovakia, Poland, possibly Germany as a free-lancer, and points East (Russia) are legal options.
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teflworldwideprague



Joined: 13 May 2009
Posts: 4
Location: Prague

PostPosted: Mon Apr 07, 2014 11:08 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I second Spiral78 on all of that. In addition there is Turkey and Hungary. In Hungary there is a way to work legally but I don't know it off hand. In Spain and France you can enroll in a language course and apply for a student visa which allows you to work 20 hours a week, which is basically considered full-time teaching.

The CR is definitely still an option. We have many Americans on our course monthly get jobs and visas here. The most common way these days is to get a Trade License and Business Visa. The whole nostrification process was taking too long and eating up a big part of the 90 days that you are allowed in the Schengen Territory. Plus with a work permit you are tied to one school. With the Business Visa you are more of a freelancer that can work at multiple schools.

Feel free to contact me for more info.

Cheryl info@teflworldwideprague.com
www.teflworldwideprague.com
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spiral78



Joined: 05 Apr 2004
Posts: 9375
Location: On a Short Leash

PostPosted: Mon Apr 07, 2014 12:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
In Hungary there is a way to work legally but I don't know it off hand. In Spain and France you can enroll in a language course and apply for a student visa which allows you to work 20 hours a week, which is basically considered full-time teaching.




Hungary has the CETP program (there is a current thread on the General Europe forum with more info on this), but it's basically very low-paid- as are all teaching jobs in Hungary these days!
http://forums.eslcafe.com/job/viewtopic.php?t=106135&start=0

It is actually possible to sign up for language - or other university study- courses in Spain or France and thereby get a student visa. BUT The courses have to be full time university courses (which cost a fair amount of money). Part time language courses at a language school don't qualify.


Last edited by spiral78 on Mon Apr 07, 2014 5:21 pm; edited 1 time in total
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Xie Lin



Joined: 21 Oct 2011
Posts: 305

PostPosted: Mon Apr 07, 2014 3:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:

It is not actually possible to sign up for language - or other university study- courses in Spain or France and thereby get a student visa. BUT The courses have to be full time university courses (which cost a fair amount of money). Part time language courses at a language school don't qualify.


I think this may be true in France--I haven't kept up-to-date, so I can't say--but it is no longer true in Spain. A full-time university course is not the only course of study that now qualifies for a student visa. The program DOES have to be approved by the Ministry of Education, and it must include a minimum number of hours per week of study. There are Ministry approved language schools. But keep in mind two things: a year-long course with enough hours to qualify costs a chunk of money (as Spiral suggested); and you will have very little time left to enjoy the country after both studying and teaching.

.
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spiral78



Joined: 05 Apr 2004
Posts: 9375
Location: On a Short Leash

PostPosted: Mon Apr 07, 2014 5:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for updated into!
Also a good point that 20 contact hours of teaching (plus prep and travel) is a full time job. Regular study on top of that would be tough.
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