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MrWright



Joined: 27 Feb 2008
Posts: 118
Location: Arizona

PostPosted: Sat Mar 29, 2014 8:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Touche sir. I was perhaps being a tad hyperbolic. Still, hot. Do most schools have ac in them? And please someone chime in on the current state of affairs there and how it impacts esl teachers. As a side note, I arrived in Nepal in May 2006, just weeks after the end of a 10 years civil war and a public protest movement that I would say rivaled what went down there in Egypt. And I was fine. Just stay away from the protest crowds, don't get involved or discuss local politics, and it was fine. However, there isn't any anti-american sentiment in Nepal, so that could change the comparison considerably. I guess what I'm saying is I'm not delicate or overly fragile. Some risk is ok. Just don't want to be asking for trouble.
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justcolleen



Joined: 07 Jan 2004
Posts: 644
Location: Egypt, baby!

PostPosted: Sat Mar 29, 2014 8:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

MrWright wrote:
No A/C? Really? I live in Arizona, I think similar climate to Egypt, and without A/C people would die, literally! Besides, I wear these underarmor heatgear compression shirts under my dress shirt that cover the tattoos and actually make it cooler than not covering them. Still, would need A/C. With all the turmoil there, what's the situation for esl teachers? Bad time to come?


Whether a building has A/C in each room isn't the issue. The problem is that the government can't afford the demand for electricity, so they shut it off as they please - with no notice and no set schedule - to save money.

Here's my opinion about "the turmoil": Egypt has a, what?, 7,000 year history of tossing governments out so this is not new and, in fact, Egyptians have become quite good at it. As for work, there's plenty to be had.
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veiledsentiments



Joined: 20 Feb 2003
Posts: 15868
Location: USA

PostPosted: Sun Mar 30, 2014 2:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Egypt is not as hot as Arizona... and often more humid. This is a good time for finding a job as Justcolleen said... expats are staying away. But, for the last months, the electric has been off as much as on and there is no end in sight to this problem. So, if AC is crucial for you... Egypt might not be a good choice right now.

And, most AC is big wall units. My last flat had only one unit in the living room.

Have you thought about Morocco?

VS
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MrWright



Joined: 27 Feb 2008
Posts: 118
Location: Arizona

PostPosted: Sun Mar 30, 2014 6:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yeah, I'm open to that. Do tell more, please.
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Big_H



Joined: 21 Dec 2013
Posts: 72

PostPosted: Sun Mar 30, 2014 8:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

justcolleen wrote:
Here's my opinion about "the turmoil": Egypt has a, what?, 7,000 year history of tossing governments out so this is not new and, in fact, Egyptians have become quite good at it. As for work, there's plenty to be had.


Actually it's the other way around, the people have put up with authoritarian rule through their entire history that for the next few years -and the last three- they'll be releasing that pent-up frustration by deposing whoever takes charge, simply because they can. Revolting has become what we call in Arabic "Sabooba", i.e. the way that everyone is resorting to.

Morocco is a wonderful place, but keep in mind that each country has its pros and cons; and it's up to you to choose which combination suits you best. For instance, colleen isn't a masochist to stay here -in Egypt- just to put up with lack of AC in a hot weather, there must be some pleasing reasons for her to stay around too. Yet it's very true that power outages are at least 1 hour long every other day and it'll only get worse in the summer when electricity consumption becomes even higher.

Mr Wright; I would say that the anti-American sense is focused only on the government; in general, people here do not make enemies out of other people, but they can be against their officials who are the ones calling the shots. Though it's up to the expats here to vouch for that from their own experience.

Enjoy your trip wherever you choose to go,

Big_H
Sarcastic local
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veiledsentiments



Joined: 20 Feb 2003
Posts: 15868
Location: USA

PostPosted: Sun Mar 30, 2014 4:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Must point out that I have friends who live around Cairo... whose power tends to be out every day... at an unpredictable time... for hours and hours. It has been very frustrating for them as it hasn't been this bad since back in the 80's when I was studying at AUC.

I spent a month in Morocco and loved it. To live there long term, you probably should be able to speak some French (or Arabic, of course) as English is not as widespread as in Egypt. I felt that Rabat was rather a cleaner, quieter, and perhaps saner city than Cairo, but is a lovely place with quite a few language schools teaching English.

VS
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justcolleen



Joined: 07 Jan 2004
Posts: 644
Location: Egypt, baby!

PostPosted: Sun Mar 30, 2014 10:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Big_H wrote:
Yet it's very true that power outages are at least 1 hour long every other day and it'll only get worse in the summer when electricity consumption becomes even higher.


It depends on location. The swanky - really swanky - areas don't have power outages at all.

There is no way to predict when the electricity will go off or how long the outage will be. It just happens. I couldn't imagine being caught in an elevator when they throw the switch.

Sure, it will get worse in the summer because of the use of fans and A/C. More than that, though, will be the over the top demand on the grid when all of these illegal, slapped-up apartment buildings are occupied and there are tens of thousands of residential and commercial units competing for limited resources. Egypt should plan on getting used to maybe one hour of electricity each evening, because that's all the government will be able to afford.
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MrWright



Joined: 27 Feb 2008
Posts: 118
Location: Arizona

PostPosted: Mon Mar 31, 2014 2:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The problem with Morocco then would be that I speak neither French nor Arabic. I think I would enjoy North Africa in general. The whole Med world really, but as an American my options are limited to the south side mostly. Turkey is another option. As a bonafide History nerd, I can hardly resist. Hence my interest in Egypt. I'm in LOVE with ancient Egyptian history, but that whole region is overflowing with historical significance. And I'm guessing that how this is going to go down is that I'll move from country to country after a year or two in different locales. Then again, I could find a sweet spot and settle in for a while. We'll see.
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Joined: 20 Feb 2003
Posts: 15868
Location: USA

PostPosted: Mon Mar 31, 2014 3:17 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I would try them all!! You won't make a lot of money, but it should keep your interest for a few years.

VS
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MrWright



Joined: 27 Feb 2008
Posts: 118
Location: Arizona

PostPosted: Thu May 01, 2014 2:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Is it best to find the job beforehand, or can I come and look in person? How does the visa process work?
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MrWright



Joined: 27 Feb 2008
Posts: 118
Location: Arizona

PostPosted: Sat Jun 21, 2014 9:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Anyone? Boots on the ground or job lined up first?
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SirAristede



Joined: 26 May 2014
Posts: 66
Location: The New World

PostPosted: Sat Jun 21, 2014 9:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Generally, it is required to have a job lined up before arriving in the Middle East since obtaining the proper employment/work visa usually has to originate in one's home country (or resident country depending on the country and its applicable requirements). I am not an expert on North Africa, though I would assume similar stipulations are also in place.
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Joined: 20 Feb 2003
Posts: 15868
Location: USA

PostPosted: Sat Jun 21, 2014 7:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Actually, not true in Egypt. Other that the very top level positions, like AUC or perhaps CAC, coming and knocking on doors is doable. BUT and it is a big but, because of the current level of chaos at the governmental level, getting legal work visas may be problematic. And it isn't like the old days when one could just go to the Mogamma and renew your tourist visa for years on end.

So, if you do go and try to find work, press them on the work visa issue. (sorry, I missed your question back on May 1)

VS
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SirAristede



Joined: 26 May 2014
Posts: 66
Location: The New World

PostPosted: Sun Jun 22, 2014 2:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

That's useful information, VS! I had a notion that North Africa's (esp. Egypt's) onboarding processes might work differently than the rest of the Middle East, but I haven't heard of many people arriving to work in Egypt without prior arrangements (esp. in light of recent political events). Your post would indicate it is more common than I thought. Perhaps I am the kind of person that likes things hammered out before arrival. Smile
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Joined: 20 Feb 2003
Posts: 15868
Location: USA

PostPosted: Sun Jun 22, 2014 12:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It is always best if you can, and especially if you have good credentials and experience to offer. But places like Egypt and Morocco have long been popular with those who arrive in a country and want to stay a year or two for both the work and experience.

But, you need some money available to tide you over until you have paychecks.

VS
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