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The British School in Maglie, Puglia

 
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saveferris



Joined: 04 Feb 2013
Posts: 3

PostPosted: Wed Feb 06, 2013 2:12 pm    Post subject: The British School in Maglie, Puglia Reply with quote

Hi,

I have just been offered a teaching job at the British School in Maglie (near Lecce). Does anyone have any advice or opinions on the British School in Maglie, the town itself, or the local area (southern Puglia)?

Thank you.

Nick
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Aimer



Joined: 12 Feb 2013
Posts: 5

PostPosted: Fri Feb 15, 2013 7:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi there,

I live in Lecce, which is the nearest (small) city to Maglie.

Maglie is a town of only moderate size but is affluent, pretty and has a nice vibe. Lots of nice cafes, restaurants etc. The southern region of Puglia is known as Salento and you are not far from some stunning coast line. As you can probably guess it is an area very much geared towards tourists coming to the coast in the Summer months and depending on what your interests are you may find it pretty quiet. Southern Italy can be pretty scruffy on the surface but Maglie is one of the prettiest towns in the area. You will need a car to get around though. The vast majority of people will be very welcoming and although you are unlikely to find many English speakers you will find even the smallest bit of Italian will get you a long way.

I can't speak about the school but I would advise extreme caution and do a lot more research as I know that in the past a school in
Maglie has had a very bad reputation. Please note I am not saying it is this one as I just don't know and besides things change all the time, but be careful.

Good luck. If you are a lover of Italy than some time in
Maglie could be a wonderful experience if you are prepared to put in some work.
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saveferris



Joined: 04 Feb 2013
Posts: 3

PostPosted: Fri Feb 15, 2013 8:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thank you very much for replying. It is very useful to know a bit more about the area.
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sdiv



Joined: 15 Feb 2013
Posts: 2

PostPosted: Mon Feb 18, 2013 5:38 pm    Post subject: Has anyone worked at the British school Maglie? Reply with quote

My girlfriend and I are also thinking about working at this school. Has anyone worked there who can give their experiences? There are some negative comments on the internet but these are from around 6 years ago. Has anyone worked there in the last 2 years? And would they (or not) recommend it? Any advice would be a big help, thanks.
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hannah83



Joined: 10 Jan 2014
Posts: 4

PostPosted: Thu Mar 06, 2014 4:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've worked here before. Would never do it again, neither would the two other teachers who were working alongside me at the time.
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valery74



Joined: 13 Apr 2014
Posts: 2
Location: Italia

PostPosted: Wed May 28, 2014 1:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

http://www.katebailward.com/drivinglikeamaniac/contact-katja/
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valery74



Joined: 13 Apr 2014
Posts: 2
Location: Italia

PostPosted: Fri May 22, 2015 4:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It’s the Festa di San Nicola. The town is decked out like a Christmas tree (appropriate, given the saint we’re celebrating – yes, it’s that Saint Nick), and there are food stalls at every corner. Sweet stalls selling foot-long black ropes of liquorice and enormous slabs of golden peanut brittle jostle for space with vendors hawking buckets of salted anchovies and bright yellow couscous. The air is heady with the toasted sugar smell of candy floss, and stallholders banter as they toss almonds in sticky caramel before dropping them with practised deftness into paper cones for waiting children.

The lights that have been put up in town are amazing. I’ve been watching their slow unveiling over the past few weeks with interest. First came stout wooden poles, painted in the colours of the Italian flag, trailing wires from the top. Then came the frames for the lights, which look like snowflakes in the daylight. How pretty, thought I, until I got up close to them and realised that the bulbs were all manner of different colours. Expecting something along the lines of these shrines to tastelessness, I was pleased to discover that, in fact, they all looked rather pretty when lit up. OK, so they were a little gaudy, but this is Italy, and they do love their bling here. It could have been an awful lot worse. Alex and I amuse ourselves for an hour or so, taking photographs from various different angles. At one point I remove the camera from my face and realise that I’ve been shooting straight over the head of one of my students for the past five minutes. The same one that I ran into in Otranto the other week. This is becoming a habit. We grin and wave at each other and I return to my photography, only to be interrupted by someone shrieking my name. I look up and am practically knocked flat by another of my students as she greets me joyfully with a kiss on both cheeks. She’s with a friend who is mortally embarrassed at being introduced to The English Teacher. Oblivious, my student, E, chatters away about her evening at breakneck speed, asking questions without waiting for the answers and thoroughly enjoying herself. As always, it takes me a moment to translate what she’s saying, but I work out (after I’ve nodded in assent to her last question and received a horrified ‘No!’ from her, that what she’s actually asking is if Alex and I are leaving now. Oh. Er – no. We’re going for gelato. Yes, I know it’s only 10.30. No, it’s not my bedtime yet. No, Alex isn’t my boyfriend. ‘But he want to be future boyfriend of Kate, no?’ She gives me an arch wink as Alex melts into a puddle of embarrassed Englishman in the middle of a very Italian piazza. E shouts with laughter. ‘I must to go to look for the boys rich now. With the cars big! Is good idea, no?!’ She kisses me goodbye. ‘Hello baby!’ As always, I correct her, but as always she ignores me, too excited about whatever she’s doing next to concentrate on the here and now.

Exhausted and laughing, I flop into one of the plastic chairs ranged in the square to listen to the band playing their way through a selection of Turandot highlights. They’ve just got to ‘Nessun Dorma’, and the square is packed with people listening with rapt attention. The conductor plays to the crowd, drawing every ounce of emotion out of his musicians, crouching forward in the quiet parts, then bursting with energy a minute later, his floppy hair flying around his face as he conducts with not just his arms but his entire body. More than one person around me is singing along, and by the time the music reaches its climax I find I have tears in my eyes. There is rapturous applause and then the square clears, straight into the nearest gelateria. I follow the herd. It may be 10.30pm, but this is balmy southern Italy, and eating gelato is a 24-hour pastime here. I gaze in awe at the great mounds of cream, shot through with either brightly coloured fruit syrups or flecks of nuts depending on the flavour, sitting behind the gelateria counter’s polished glass and brass frontage. Amareno and pistachio is my current favourite combination, the dark red of the cherries contrasting with the white of the cream and the near-neon green of the pistachio nuts. I’m very tempted by cassata siciliana, though – it’s just so vivid, with its multicoloured mixture of candied fruit and nuts. The best thing about Italian ice-cream, however, is that it’s not so sickly sweet as the UK versions, and it’s therefore possible to eat an awful lot of it.

I order all three flavours and tuck in with gusto.
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