Site Search:
 
TEFL International Supports Dave's ESL Cafe
TEFL Courses, TESOL Course, English Teaching Jobs - TEFL International
Job Discussion Forums Forum Index Job Discussion Forums
"The Internet's Meeting Place for ESL/EFL Students and Teachers from Around the World!"
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

Teaching 40hrs+ a week in Vietnam?
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Job Discussion Forums Forum Index -> Vietnam
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
ExpatLuke



Joined: 11 Feb 2012
Posts: 421

PostPosted: Mon Mar 03, 2014 3:09 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've had the opposite experience here. It seems that any Westerner you run in to is going to be happy to strike up a conversation with you if you initiate. It could be the smaller city mentality, but it really seems like the expat community here is tighter knit than the stories I hear elsewhere. Of course you have a few of the folks who think they're super important because they run their own business or whatnot, and they seem to think that fraternizing with English teachers or hospitality workers is beneath them. But overall, I've never felt unwelcome in the company of random Westerners I've met.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
JSutt



Joined: 22 Jan 2013
Posts: 24

PostPosted: Sun Mar 09, 2014 1:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

mark_in_saigon wrote:
Not sure what the stereotype really is, but ever since I have been here, whenever I see westerners outside of the tourist areas, I notice that they mostly want to pretend they do not see their fellow westerner.


Stuff Expats Like #17: pretending not to see other expats.

http://stuffexpataidworkerslike.com/2011/01/27/17-pretending-not-to-see-each-other/

Well-known phenomenon, I've talked to friends in Cambodia who say it is much, much worse there.

ExpatLuke wrote:
I've had the opposite experience here. It seems that any Westerner you run in to is going to be happy to strike up a conversation with you if you initiate. It could be the smaller city mentality, but it really seems like the expat community here is tighter knit than the stories I hear elsewhere. Of course you have a few of the folks who think they're super important because they run their own business or whatnot, and they seem to think that fraternizing with English teachers or hospitality workers is beneath them. But overall, I've never felt unwelcome in the company of random Westerners I've met.


Maybe one of the big differences between living in Da Nang and living in HCM/HN? Foreigners are definitely still a novelty with the local kids here too, especially if you have blue eyes and/or blond hair.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
mark_in_saigon



Joined: 20 Sep 2009
Posts: 793

PostPosted: Sun Mar 09, 2014 4:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Interesting story, yeah, that pretty much nailed the way they seem to feel.

I do find that IF you are so close and so fast that you start a conversation without giving them time to pretend not to see you, they will sometimes then become civil. I think these folks just generally do not like to see other westerners here, but once they see it is inevitable, sometimes they remember they did not hate everyone they knew back home, and so they may make an exception in your case if you are really nice and make the first move. Not sure it is worth the effort though, most of us are unusual in one way or another, and so we leave our own people for various reasons.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
drpangloss



Joined: 21 Mar 2012
Posts: 25

PostPosted: Sun Mar 09, 2014 6:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Related to the topic of being civil to other westerners: hi, I'm Sam. I live in Saigon. Anyone want to get a drink sometime this week?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
skarper



Joined: 12 Oct 2006
Posts: 326

PostPosted: Mon Mar 10, 2014 6:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm asocial by nature - more easily bored in the company of others than alone.

It'd be nice to have a few Western friends (I have zero) but I tend to avoid it because they lead me into bad habits. Drinking too much - complaining about Vietnam etc.

Also, I have had bad experiences with ex-pats sponging off me twice before, so I am especially wary.

But I am I realize an odd fish.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
VietCanada



Joined: 30 Nov 2010
Posts: 326

PostPosted: Sun Apr 27, 2014 2:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Expats complaining about Vietnam has been an issue for me.

Drinking buddies in Q.1 HCMC or visitors to my house who whinge and beech about their dealings with the bureaucracy or ranting about how stupid the Vietnamese are are really not my idea of quality social events.

One or two people who live near me speak English pretty well. Some of my students live nearby. Having visitors who loudly proclaim that the VN are stupid along with their examples is just not cool. It is embarrassing. Especially when they do so in the alleyway outside my door while franticly and angrily eyeing up all my neighbours.

Doesn't anybody have a sense of humour?

I understand living here can be tough especially if you are married to a VN and live in a VN alleyway like me but the most difficult thing of all IMHO is finding expat companionship that respects my marriage, my marriage partner, the people and culture of VN, their VN students, and co-workers.

Why is that?

Why so serious?

Like Skarper I am an odd fish but it's still nice to get out once in a while and have some sheets and giggles with fellow expats.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
The_Big_White_Elephant



Joined: 12 Mar 2014
Posts: 34

PostPosted: Sun Jun 01, 2014 11:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

1st Sgt Welsh wrote:
Some interesting comments here Cool.

In regards to Mark's belief that TEFLing here "will take years off your life", well, I wouldn't necessarily have thought so. What's the annual vacation time in the States? About two weeks seems pretty common to me, but I'm not an American. Anyway, most teachers here do better than that. I know I do and I actually get teased all the time by my co-workers about all the holidays I take Embarassed. However, I'm very grateful to finally be in a position, after about twenty years in the work force, to do this. Besides, like the old adage goes, no one lies on their death bed regretting that they didn't spend more time in the office. Vacation time may not be an important consideration for some people, but it is for me.

If the OP has a job that s/he enjoys and it is well-remunerated, well, that's great and s/he probably should stick with it. However, if they don't then that's a problem. Being stuck in a cubicle for sixty hours a week certainly doesn't sound like my idea of fun and I don't see much point in getting up every day in order to do something that you don't like so you can do it all over again the next day and the next week and the next year and so on. I've been there, done that.

I don't want to go into too much detail, but I have worked in what most people would consider stressful jobs and, compared to that and based on my personal experience TEFLing in Vietnam has been a breeze. Indeed, things like equipment malfunctions, long commutes, "stoopid meetings, arguing with the manager" and "'support' staff" happened all the time back in Australia as well.

Please don't misunderstand me, I'm not saying the OP should come here. I don't know him/her or their circumstances well enough. For all I know, s/he may never have experienced working and living in a foreign country and may hate being away from home. Furthermore, the fact that the OP will be comparatively late in starting a new career is also food for thought. Maybe I've just been lucky, but what I can say is that I started here when I was in my late mid-to-late thirties as my first TEFLing job, I had made some good investments previously (which are not paying off yet but they will) and I've never once regretted the decision to come to Vietnam.


Holy crap, someone with a positive attitude! I didnt know that was allowed at Dave's esl cafe!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
mark_in_saigon



Joined: 20 Sep 2009
Posts: 793

PostPosted: Mon Jun 02, 2014 5:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Lots of positive attitudes. What you have to realize though is the nature of the forum is for people to ask about issues (synonymous with problems), so of course much of what you read is going to be negative. Additionally, many folks who are not at all qualified or cut out for this work will ask about how it would all work out for him/her, and so of course much of that discussion has to focus on negative points as well. If you read through the site enough, you will see that most of the folks who stay long term do so for positive reasons. I have never been happier in my life, but that does not mean that I think most things here are wonderful. They are not. I just can work around the negatives and mostly enjoy the positives.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
TRH



Joined: 27 Oct 2011
Posts: 200
Location: HCMC

PostPosted: Mon Jun 02, 2014 8:53 am    Post subject: time management Reply with quote

I thought about starting a new tread for this but since this one seems pretty far off topic anyway, here is an interesting take on time management from an ESL professional. Vietnamese are not mentioned per se but I think most will see where they fit into the scheme of things.

http://www.businessinsider.com/how-different-cultures-understand-time-2014-5
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
skarper



Joined: 12 Oct 2006
Posts: 326

PostPosted: Mon Jun 02, 2014 10:29 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I actually did a couple of days 'teaching' at the author's mansion/school for executives [golf course on the grounds no less].

I was not impressed - all fluff and no substance. But this article is amusing and fun to read. All assertion and no argument or concrete examples though.

Richard Lewis has certainly led an interesting life and does speak a string of languages. And he has made money from peddling this line of 'wisdom'. So bully for him.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Job Discussion Forums Forum Index -> Vietnam All times are GMT
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6
Page 6 of 6

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


This page is maintained by the one and only Dave Sperling.
Contact Dave's ESL Cafe
Copyright © 2011 Dave Sperling. All Rights Reserved.

Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2002 phpBB Group

Road2Spain - TEFL and Spanish with one year student visa
EBC