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State Licensure Requirements for Public School Teaching

 
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peripatetic_soul



Joined: 20 Oct 2013
Posts: 292

PostPosted: Wed Aug 03, 2016 5:48 pm    Post subject: State Licensure Requirements for Public School Teaching Reply with quote

This topic was raised in the thread on the Plight for ESL Instructors at Colleges (mitsui, et al.), but thought it best to begin a new one:

There are 3 different Praxis tests for public school teaching. Licensure requirements vary by state. For instance, California does not require Praxis but a separate test designed specifically for that State.

PRAXIS I (PPST) is a basic test of Reading, Writing and Math. Scoring is based on the number of questions answered correctly so there is no penalty for unanswered ones. In VA, for example, a passing score was based on an aggregate score so if one excels in Reading and Writing but may be deficient in Math, it's still possible to pass.

PRAXIS II consists of 3 types of exams, each of which measures knowledge of a specific subject or grade level and related teaching skills. This test is often required for state licensure.

PRAXIS III is for beginning teachers (e.g., provisional status or with a temporary teaching license) and assesses classroom teaching techniques and skills.

Some helpful websites:

http://www.alleducationschools.com/degrees-licensing/praxis-teaching-exams/

For scoring ranges explained: ets.org/praxis/scores/understand

PRAXIS scores are valid and reportable for 10 years.

Each state sets its own range of passing scores. See: ets.org/praxis/states


Regards,
PS
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BadBeagleBad



Joined: 23 Aug 2010
Posts: 1186
Location: 24.18105,-103.25185

PostPosted: Wed Aug 03, 2016 10:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes, but passing the Praxis, or whatever other test, is not the only requirement, you have to have done a degree in Education, done successful student teaching and pass a background check. Then, to be hired you have another set of hoops to jump through. Been there, done that.
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peripatetic_soul



Joined: 20 Oct 2013
Posts: 292

PostPosted: Thu Aug 04, 2016 11:32 am    Post subject: State Licensure Requirements for Public School Teaching Reply with quote

Badbeagle,

I was addressing the question of Praxis tests. However, true, each state varies as to ALL requirements.

There can be alternate routes to licensure. I did not matriculate through the School of Education but instead, earned M.A.s in Applied Linguistics and TESOL. I had taken several courses in Education, though, so after the DOE's review of transcripts, I only had to take one course. My teaching experience post-MA at college/univ. was accepted in lieu of student teaching. I'm not suggesting that may be acceptable in every state.

Security clearance in the state where I taught simply involved finger printing and providing a copy of driver's license on the school premises and then the County ran the security check. You're right, though, there are lots of variations from state to state.

As such, one should contact the state DOE to determine "all the hoops one must jump through."

PS
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mitsui



Joined: 10 Jun 2007
Posts: 1562
Location: Kawasaki

PostPosted: Thu Aug 04, 2016 11:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I am certified in both ESL and English to give myself options.
My wife probably doesn't want to live on the east coast but would consider Florida. Florida needs more teachers.

Arizona sucks since it is a right to work state.
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peripatetic_soul



Joined: 20 Oct 2013
Posts: 292

PostPosted: Thu Aug 04, 2016 2:14 pm    Post subject: State Licensure Requirements for Public School Teaching Reply with quote

Hello, mitsui,

Here's a link to Florida DOE's licensure requirements for public school teachers:

http://www.fldoe.org/teaching/certification/general-cert-requirements/

Basically, teacher candidates must submit results of 3 FTCEs (Florida Teacher Certification Exams): subject area exam (English or ESL?), General Knowledge Test and Professional Education Test.

The link provides all the details for exams and other licensure requirements. Since you already have a degree in English (can't recall if you said you also have an ESL endorsement or MA/TESOL), you may want to check out the "reciprocity" section.

You may wish to submit your transcripts for review to the FLDOE's Licensure Specialist. There's probably a fee but would give you an idea of what you need to complete. Or, if you land a temporary or part-time position in a school there, administration can submit credentials on your behalf if they are interested in hiring you full-time. The current buzz phrase in public school these days is to hire "highly qualified" teachers.

Speaking Spanish will be an asset there!
Hope this helps. Best wishes.

PS
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peripatetic_soul



Joined: 20 Oct 2013
Posts: 292

PostPosted: Fri Aug 05, 2016 12:23 pm    Post subject: State Licensure Requirements for Public School Teaching Reply with quote

Dear mitsui,

Sending you a PM on tips before you head home and apply for p.s. positions.

Regards,
PS
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mitsui



Joined: 10 Jun 2007
Posts: 1562
Location: Kawasaki

PostPosted: Mon Aug 29, 2016 5:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I am looking at getting certified in Hawaii.
I think my wife can get work easier as she can do Japanese translation or interpreting. Cost of living is high, but I think I can get work.

I think I can go to standard certification with my experience. Up to six years of teaching in Japan could be accepted.
I want to be dual certified in English and ESL.
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Mike E



Joined: 06 Oct 2011
Posts: 132

PostPosted: Mon Mar 19, 2018 10:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Just an observation: From my experience Googling and calling and emailing around regarding licensure rules in states here in the Midwest, even just this notion that each state will have a "Licensure Specialist" one can contact with these question belies the true depths of the bureaucratic confusion. I've done an M.Ed in TESOL curriculum & instruction and a 140-hour TESOL certification program on the west coast, and still nothing in my research has led me to believe that public school certification programs in my state or the surrounding states would let me do any more than start at square one and go through their whole program just like somebody with no background in teaching. Teachers I know in other states say that sounds ridiculous to them, but if indeed there are licensure specialists in my area who can demonstrate that it isn't true, I've yet to find them.
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nomad soul



Joined: 31 Jan 2010
Posts: 11388
Location: The real world

PostPosted: Tue Mar 20, 2018 12:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Mike E wrote:
I've done an M.Ed in TESOL curriculum & instruction and a 140-hour TESOL certification program on the west coast, and still nothing in my research has led me to believe that public school certification programs in my state or the surrounding states would let me do any more than start at square one and go through their whole program just like somebody with no background in teaching.

Did you fully read the overview for your M.Ed program? Not all TESOL-related MAs are created equal. Degree programs like your M.Ed in TESOL Curriculum & Instruction are usually geared toward experienced, in-service teachers. In other words, they already have a teaching license and related k12 experience and are pursuing a master's degree for professional development reasons, especially if they're interested in working in a leadership/administrative role. In fact, I suspect most, if not all, of your classmates were employed as public school teachers while completing their M.Ed.

Rather than researching numerous state education departments, contact local school districts to see if your M.Ed requires licensure or endorsements. You'll likely need to start from scratch if k12 is your target teaching situation. BTW, a 140-hour TESOL cert is for teaching adult ESL learners rather than k12 levels.
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RedLightning



Joined: 08 Aug 2015
Posts: 121
Location: United States

PostPosted: Tue Mar 20, 2018 5:17 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Mike E wrote:
Just an observation: From my experience Googling and calling and emailing around regarding licensure rules in states here in the Midwest, even just this notion that each state will have a "Licensure Specialist" one can contact with these question belies the true depths of the bureaucratic confusion. I've done an M.Ed in TESOL curriculum & instruction and a 140-hour TESOL certification program on the west coast, and still nothing in my research has led me to believe that public school certification programs in my state or the surrounding states would let me do any more than start at square one and go through their whole program just like somebody with no background in teaching. Teachers I know in other states say that sounds ridiculous to them, but if indeed there are licensure specialists in my area who can demonstrate that it isn't true, I've yet to find them.


The state I live in was kind enough to do away with my certification several years ago and now, despite my teaching courses in the Pedagogy department of a university, I actually cannot legally be hired in the public school system; my students are actually 'above' me in this respect.
I would suggest working in charter schools, some of which pay as much as the local school districts, but even in these a certification is required to teacher ESL / Special Ed.
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JN



Joined: 17 Jan 2008
Posts: 214

PostPosted: Sat Mar 24, 2018 5:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Fortunately I don't have to start from scratch to get public school teaching certification in Idaho. I have to do a graduate certificate in secondary English teaching. This is 2 semesters of classes, plus student teaching.

Of course, it will depend on your background. I have an MATESOL and a few years of teaching, but some courses taken that applied to teaching during my TESOL unrelated undergraduate degree. It just depends on where you live and what your situation is.

As Nomad Soul said, contact the local school districts.
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