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HAS ANYONE DONE THIS?

 
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Trebek



Joined: 30 Oct 2003
Posts: 401
Location: China

PostPosted: Thu Oct 27, 2016 10:42 pm    Post subject: HAS ANYONE DONE THIS? Reply with quote

I have taught in China for a few years and now I want to teach in Southeast Asia. I continue to teach online for a Chinese organization and make about $1000 per month part time.

If I keep my luggage to a minimum, I can move from country to country (every 3 months depending on the visa laws), and do privates or even private english school gigs while continuing my part time job. Think about it? I never really would need a work permit.

Sounds like a great idea for a rolling stone who seeks to gather no moss.

Chime in with your opinions please....
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nomad soul



Joined: 31 Jan 2010
Posts: 11324
Location: The real world

PostPosted: Fri Oct 28, 2016 1:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Trebek wrote:
If I keep my luggage to a minimum, I can move from country to country (every 3 months depending on the visa laws), and do privates or even private english school gigs while continuing my part time job. Think about it? I never really would need a work permit.

Since you plan to rely on the income from your online China job, as you contemplate moving from country to country, be aware that not all Internet connections are created equal. Additionally, it sounds like you intend to work illegally, which limits you to schools willing to bring you on board with a lowball offer. Not only is working without a permit risky, you're not likely to get steady gigs. Just some food for thought.
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Trebek



Joined: 30 Oct 2003
Posts: 401
Location: China

PostPosted: Sat Oct 29, 2016 1:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Of course I would prefer to work legally, but that depends on if I can find a job with low hours that will help me get a work permit.

Let's take the illegal work out of the equation. I can probably manage working two on-line jobs at once in order to pay the bills and a modest lifestyle.

Does anyone juggle countries like this that you are aware of. It will take 3 to 4 moves per year and only to places that have good reliable internet.
(so Nepal is out of the question as is Myanmar).
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suphanburi



Joined: 20 Mar 2014
Posts: 891

PostPosted: Sat Oct 29, 2016 3:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Korea, Japan, Taiwan. Rinse and repeat but the cost of living may not work for you.

Thailand may be an option but your on-line work is illegal (not that many get caught unless they brag about it).

Kuala Lumpur, Bangkok and Jakarta but the cost of living may also be an issue.

.
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sigmoid



Joined: 21 Jan 2003
Posts: 1245

PostPosted: Sat Oct 29, 2016 5:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes, working as a Digital Nomad is now possible and becoming more popular. Some friends and I have been doing it for the last year plus. The 'nomad' part is a bit theoretical though, in that you COULD work "anywhere in the world", but most seem to prefer to establish a base, and have the option to travel around if you feel like it or need to do a visa run. The general idea is that if you can live and work online "anywhere in the world", why not just choose the "best" place and stay there? Since you're not relying on schools for work, you can avoid the big cities and work in say, a small scenic quiet coastal town. If you get bored, hit the road and travel up the coast or to the mountains, or visit some friends in the big city for a few days, or pop in on a neighboring country, etc.

There are also numerous options other than online teaching/tutoring, mostly article writing, SEO, proofreading/editing, translation, transcription and tech stuff like website design, etc.


Your main concern is, as already mentioned, obviously a good internet connection, especially for teaching by video. With document-based work, you also pretty much need a smartphone so you can receive notifications when work comes in and to stay in touch with clients.

A reliable electricity supply is also essential, of course. Some developing countries or rural locations may not always be able to provide this. Power cuts/blackouts can occur even in the industrialized world.

Finally, you need to work out how you are going to get paid. You need bank accounts with cards and usually a PayPal account, although there are a number of competitors appearing now.

Anyway, if you can get all your ducks in a row, it's worth a shot for those who enjoy freedom and independence. You can always fall back on teaching if you need to. Even if you're married with kids for some reason and stuck in one place, there are options for supplementing your income.
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Trebek



Joined: 30 Oct 2003
Posts: 401
Location: China

PostPosted: Sun Oct 30, 2016 4:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks Supanburi and Sigmoid. Lots of food for thought. I agree with Sigmoids point about making all your money online then moving from Thailand to Malaysia to elsewhere and never need a work visa. Living in an apartment in Southeast Asia is so cheap that one can easily fly home for part of that year if desired. "Anyway, if you can get all your ducks in a row, it's worth a shot for those who enjoy freedom and independence" (Sigmoid), I couldn't agree with you more. Most of the hassle I encountered living in China had to do with places I worked for, having me by the balls since they had control of my work permit.
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sigmoid



Joined: 21 Jan 2003
Posts: 1245

PostPosted: Thu Nov 03, 2016 3:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
I agree with Sigmoids point about making all your money online then moving from Thailand to Malaysia to elsewhere and never need a work visa.


Not sure why anyone would consider living in Thailand now, even briefly.

Malaysia could be pleasant for a while and I believe they still give you a free 90-day visa on arrival.

Former French Indochina - Cambodia, Laos and Vietnam - might be worth your time, but they all have their own dangers and annoyances. They've got fair wi-fi now though.
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cartago



Joined: 19 Oct 2005
Posts: 282
Location: Iraq

PostPosted: Tue Nov 15, 2016 1:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm confused on how exactly this is illegal. If he is not living in China then he would not need the work permit would he? And if he's not employed by a company in the country where he lives he's not really illegally working there is he? Or is there some other aspect I'm overlooking?
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suphanburi



Joined: 20 Mar 2014
Posts: 891

PostPosted: Wed Nov 16, 2016 1:02 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

cartago wrote:
I'm confused on how exactly this is illegal. If he is not living in China then he would not need the work permit would he? And if he's not employed by a company in the country where he lives he's not really illegally working there is he? Or is there some other aspect I'm overlooking?


example... in Thailand, even a digital nomad is legally required to have a permit to work.
Even if the clients are not in Thailand your work is.

If you say nothing about it then nobody will know.
As a "westerner" they won't worry about extended stays (multiple visas or border hops) of 6 months to 1 year. Banking can be problematic without a proper visa and/or work permit.

In the Philippines it is the same. The work is technically illegal but if you say nothing then there are no issues since you are under the radar.
You can extend a "tourist stay" for up to 3 years (60 days at a time).
The other issue is connectivity. It is usually inconsistent.

The same applies in the other countries in SE Asia with the work being technically illegal but no enforcement if you don't brag about it.
The only practical issues are managing to legally stay for an extended period (long stay tourist) and connectivity & costs issues.

.
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