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poll: sticky for non-EU prospective teachers?

 
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Would a sticky on teaching in France for non-EU nationals be helpful in this forum?
yes
100%
 100%  [ 13 ]
no
0%
 0%  [ 0 ]
Total Votes : 13

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daily chai



Joined: 16 Nov 2003
Posts: 150
Location: Brussels

PostPosted: Mon May 24, 2004 10:50 am    Post subject: poll: sticky for non-EU prospective teachers? Reply with quote

Perhaps it would be useful to put up a sticky on teaching in France for non-EU nationals. There is a sticky related to Americans in Paris which is very helpful, but perhaps one that is non-specifically directed to all non-EU parties would also be useful.
Lately there have been a few threads started with questions pertaining to it. It's easier for people new to the Cafe to post a question than to track down threads. This might help them. What do you think?

Anyone know how to make a sticky? Do we nominate one to Dave?
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Teacher in Rome



Joined: 09 Jul 2003
Posts: 1216

PostPosted: Mon May 24, 2004 5:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I agree. There are a number of posts in the Italy forum from N Americans wanting to teach in Italy. If there was a sticky with all the pertinent info (how non-Europeans can legally teach in Italy), it would save endless regurgitation of the facts.

As the situation seems to be the same in all the Schengen countries, perhaps we could post the sticky in the General Europe forum - or individually in each country forum.
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daily chai



Joined: 16 Nov 2003
Posts: 150
Location: Brussels

PostPosted: Tue May 25, 2004 12:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

TiR, all great ideas! We could put a sticky in each forum. That's a lot of repitition, but the General Europe forum doesn't seem to get as many of these questions as the country forums, so it might be useful.
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Nate



Joined: 05 Sep 2003
Posts: 61
Location: Korea

PostPosted: Mon Jun 21, 2004 2:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm not an EU citizen and would love to figure out how to teach in France, Italy... so many countries. Wish I had a fancy EU passport. Shocked
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daily chai



Joined: 16 Nov 2003
Posts: 150
Location: Brussels

PostPosted: Wed Jul 07, 2004 9:22 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Nate! Did you check out "Advice for AMericans in Paris"? There are usually a couple threads going on in each country section started by non-EU-ers too: mostlly on if they could teach, but few on actual teaching experience there. Goes to show ya...

I guess I'm waiting for a non-American to write a guide for non-EU people, since I'm American and one has already been written. Anyone...?
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Nate



Joined: 05 Sep 2003
Posts: 61
Location: Korea

PostPosted: Thu Jul 15, 2004 3:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

No, thank you for the reply. I will check it out! Very Happy
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Hondo 2.0



Joined: 05 Aug 2004
Posts: 69
Location: Canada

PostPosted: Sat Aug 07, 2004 3:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Make it sticky. Cool
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daily chai



Joined: 16 Nov 2003
Posts: 150
Location: Brussels

PostPosted: Wed Aug 11, 2004 11:37 am    Post subject: info for non-EU: updates/corrections welcome Reply with quote

Alright! This is the non-US sticky now. Smile I don't work in the EU, but am married to an EU citizen so I have it easier to get work permission than those w/o a connection. EU citizens, Aussies, Canucks, Kiwis, SA's and others please make additions/corrections if this isn't right:

Prospective employee candidates from outside the EU are generally in the same boat, regardless of nationality. You can only get permission to live and work in France or other parts of the EU under narrow circumstances: the employer has to show evidence that no national or EU national could fulfill the post s/he wants to hire you for. This may be as simple as showing a newspaper ad that unsatisfactory candidates (or no one) replied to. I don't know how long the ad would have to run, but I have heard of this as an example of how to prove this condition. Other examples are they need someone who speaks English and (French), has a master's in biotechnology and teaching experience--they need you to teach an ESP course in medical English. The issuing authority may agree these off the bat are narrow circumstances, and so give a work permit.

BUT if an employer is sufficently jazzed about hiring you, as the American in Paris found, s/he will go through a lot of red tape to secure permission for you. Read her experiences to see what she did. But you don't have to return to your native country to get a visa processed--you can do it in your country of residence. So if you're working in Asia or South America with a permit there, you can get your paperwork arranged there.

Before arrival, get your paperwork in order. Have on hand multiple (3-4)copies of unopened official transcripts and your diploma to prove your degree to multiple employers. Keep a dozen or more photocopies of your transcripts so you can show them to an employer/human resources upon request. If it's good enough for them and they're serious about hiring you (i.e. you're in the contract negotiation stage) then hand over an unopened one. CV or resume ready, bilingual, and in the appropriate format for the country where you're searching (so check what a French CV looks like first before handing over yours in a non-standard style). A ton of passport photos. Check first with whomever processeswork/residence permits or the embassy (can anyone give the contact for that in France?) if you need a legalization of your degree. I needed it, but I don't work in France. That process can take a week or more, but you can do it prior to departure through the local embassy. You might also need a birth certificate with apostille to apply for your permits--can anyone say if this is necessary? Once again check with the embassy b/c rules can change.

Bottom line: if you want to work here, it will be an uphill battle. Unlike Asia, permission is not regularly granted for work/residence to non-EU English teachers. Only come with a Plan B. Research first--go to your local embassy/consul to enquire about rules. THEY and the permit issuing authority are the people to ask--not here! We're English teachers (or wannabes). We can just offer guidance on local conditions and on the process, but they make/break the rules. Check the Net.

Arrive with a budget and timeline for hire, as in you'll spend up to # and stay up till (date) unless you find work. It sounds like you could get a RT ticket from your country of residence so your papers can be processed, or you can return to find work elsewhere. The American story had a smart plan to use the phone book and neighborhoods to plan a systematic and thorough search--I like it! You should be able to locate this info by internet prior to departure.

If you didn't do a RT, reserve money for exit. Leave before dipping into your exit money. Otherwise you'd be trapped, and being a bum isn't worth it. If Plan B is another country where you have no connections/job set up/friends, be careful to set aside money for that contingency too. If you're a college student, it's easy to get a credit card. You might apply for one and *don't buy anything* but reserve it for an exit ticket, then you don't have to have so much setup money. Be smart and willing to compromise if you don't find a job in Europe--Plan B should be home or to a country that is always hiring, like Korea or a lot of other Asian countries. The NEA countries pay better, so it might be better to go there to recoup your EU search money most quickly; but Japan is challenging to set up in because of high costs.

You could also contact Plan B prospective employers prior to departure to Europe. Your arrival date would coincide with your EU departure date. But do not sign contracts or let them pay for your tix over--that's unethical. If that area hires a lot, then you wouldn't have any problem pounding the pavement upon arrival.

Another option to try is to attend graduate school in the country where you want to work. The US Gov't gives student loans to cover tuition & living expenses for a limited # of universities all over the world; other countries might have the same system. There are a lot of pages with exhaustive lists of postsecondary institutions, or www.gradschool.com to check for specific degree programs in foreign countries. (Americans, check www.fafsa.ed.gov then search for a school code based on the city/university name. If there is a code, then aid is available.) France and most other EU countries let students work a very limited # of hours. Grad school would be a long term option: increasing your employability, getting working experience in country, while allowing you time to make contacts for a better job post-graduation if you want to stay.

The EU economy for many reasons is slowly growing, and in some countries more slowly than is healthy. Even with the best quals some people won't get hired because there are no jobs. Immigration is wary of hiring foreigners when locals are unemployed. I know this is pessimistic, but please be aware. My husband is EU and we're both in Asia because his country has such a dismal growth rate--we're quasi-economic refugees. Newspapers report how so few jobs are there now Generation Y isn't getting enough working experience. If the locals have a hard time despite language ability, connections, readily accepted training--you will too. Plan B - Exit Plan funded - Research First - Thoroughly planned job search - paperwork ready- Know when to cut your losses. These are your keys to maximizing your chances. Anyone else know of others?

Congratuations if you get a job, but if not you tried your best and that is all anyone can do. Smile On to your next journey!
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