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ESL in Japan in 2017.
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Maitoshi



Joined: 04 May 2014
Posts: 712
Location: 何処でも

PostPosted: Thu Aug 03, 2017 8:06 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Even if it relates to qualifications for teaching in Japan? The British Council organizes dispatch instructors at my current and previous unis.
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mitsui



Joined: 10 Jun 2007
Posts: 1471
Location: Kawasaki

PostPosted: Thu Aug 03, 2017 8:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes, but are they all British with a Delta and no MA?
I wonder.
I did see a job post back in March and it looked like outsourcing.
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The Transformer



Joined: 03 Mar 2017
Posts: 39

PostPosted: Thu Aug 03, 2017 10:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The Delta is more about teaching skills, with some applied linguistics thrown in for good measure. MAs seem to be pretty much focused on theory.

It depends where you want your career to go: the Delta is better if you're just focusing on teaching, an MA if you're thinking of going more into the research side.

The British Council and British unis like the Delta. From what I've seen of uni job postings in most other countries, they ask for an MA. I'm not even sure that a Japanese uni would be familiar with or recognize the Delta.
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taikibansei



Joined: 14 Sep 2004
Posts: 726
Location: Japan

PostPosted: Thu Aug 03, 2017 11:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Jagariko wrote:


I loved my applied linguistics masters course but it was in no way related to teaching English (probably why I enjoyed it so much).


Which tells us that you did not get your MA in the US.

mitsui wrote:
Well my MA was quite practical with an internship in Africa where I taught for a few months.
Whatever. I am just looking for part-time work.
No way the Delta is superior to my degree, considering I had 37 credits.


Mitsui's observations are spot on for most MA (and many PhD) programs in the humanities offered by schools in the US. The US job market has grown so competitive that training in pedagogy (to include supported and assessed teaching practice easily exceeding the CELTA) has been the standard for at least the last twenty years. To give you an idea, my first MA required two classes (30 hours) in pedagogy, two semester-long internships with veteran faculty (where I assisted with grading and class preparation and then solo taught multiple classes while the main teacher observed and evaluated), and then two semesters as a TA (where I solo taught but was observed and evaluated each semester by my faculty adviser and the Dept. Head). This was in addition to the heavy research/theoretical requirements, including a 100-page MA thesis.

My PhD (different institution) was similar, but as many of my MA credits carried, I only had to take one additional class in pedagogy and do one internship. (I was also a TA throughout my PhD program, and so observed/evaluated every semester.) I then was an associate professor at yet another US university--at this place too, all graduate students had to combine theory and practice, with internships and supported and assessed teaching practice important parts of the curriculum. Indeed, I know of very few humanities MA/PhD programs in the US which do not include pedagogy. Ironically, the top rated graduate programs--especially the Ivy League programs--are the ones most likely not to include pedagogy...apparently because they feel that learning to teach is "beneath” them. (That was the phrasing used by an Ivy League graduate we interviewed for a position at our university....)

This is in stark contrast to MA/PhD programs in the UK (and most Commonwealth countries), which almost invariably include little to no instruction in pedagogy and no supported and evaluated teaching practice. The UK government decision to rank the DELTA at grade 7 (the same as a UK master's degree) stems from the sharp divide between theory and practice in that country. More to the point, this reality is why MA/PhD holders from the US typically cannot understand why somebody with these degrees would bother getting a CELTA/DELTA, and why people from many other countries cannot understand the American inability to understand....
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Vince



Joined: 05 May 2003
Posts: 541
Location: U.S.

PostPosted: Mon Aug 07, 2017 1:44 pm    Post subject: Re: ESL in Japan in 2017. Reply with quote

weigookin74 wrote:
Just to be clear, I'd love to experience it again.

Did you used to teach EFL in Japan, or are you talking about teaching EFL overseas in general?
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weigookin74



Joined: 30 Mar 2010
Posts: 261

PostPosted: Thu Aug 17, 2017 1:33 am    Post subject: Re: ESL in Japan in 2017. Reply with quote

Vince wrote:
weigookin74 wrote:
Just to be clear, I'd love to experience it again.

Did you used to teach EFL in Japan, or are you talking about teaching EFL overseas in general?


Long ago and very very briefly. I quickly jumped ship to other nearby countries. The Great Recession hit those other countries too with increased credential requirement, flat wages, and more work requirements. But over the past couple of years, things have been on the rebound with things becoming a bit more lax and wages creeping up slightly (though nothing like it was a decade ago). Anyways, Japan was having a hard time even before the recession which I realized it wasn't worth sticking around. I had debts and had to get out of dodge. Went back to visit a few years ago for a week vacation and may go back next year for another. But, I'd really like to live for a year or so to experience it now that I don't have to worry about sending money home anymore. I know the average esler won't make money there. (Did I read on here a foreigner with a Japanese wife left and went to China to work to send money to support his wife and kids in Japan? Thought someone on here mentioned that.)

Also, I hate polluted air some parts of the year and the heat and humidity. I wonder if there's any schools up in Hokkaido? Supposedly cooler in summer and with good heating in winter? I miss real winter anyhow.
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mitsui



Joined: 10 Jun 2007
Posts: 1471
Location: Kawasaki

PostPosted: Thu Aug 17, 2017 3:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I did. But he is thinking of leaving Hong Kong, maybe because rent is too high.
He really is a rolling stone.
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