Site Search:
 
Get TEFL Certified & Start Your Adventure Today!
Teach English Abroad and Get Paid to see the World!
Job Discussion Forums Forum Index Job Discussion Forums
"The Internet's Meeting Place for ESL/EFL Students and Teachers from Around the World!"
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

FAQs about the UAE teaching licence

 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Job Discussion Forums Forum Index -> United Arab Emirates
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
nomad soul



Joined: 31 Jan 2010
Posts: 11355
Location: The real world

PostPosted: Fri Mar 30, 2018 8:47 am    Post subject: FAQs about the UAE teaching licence Reply with quote

FAQs: All you need to know about the UAE teachers licence
The National | March 14, 2018
Source: https://www.thenational.ae/uae/faqs-all-you-need-to-know-about-the-uae-teachers-licence-1.712805

(Excerpt)

Who is eligible to apply for a UAE teachers licence?
    For now, only Cycle 3 Arabic, English, maths, physics, chemistry and biology teachers working in Government high schools or private high schools that deliver the Ministry of Education curriculum have been invited to register for the first phase of the teachers licensing system, which began in March 2018.
What if I fail the tests?
    You will have two more chances to pass. But before you can re-write the tests, you will be required to enrol for training tailored to your specific needs, which will be determined by your test scores. The training will vary in length from about one month to six months.
Where can I get training?
    Training programmes are being developed by the MOE in partnership with local institutions. The MOE will release the names of the training institutes it has partnered with after it has issued the first tests in April and September.
What if I pass the tests?
    You will earn your UAE teachers license, which may be valid between one to three years, depending on your qualifications, test scores and experience.
I heard that expatriate teachers who were already licensed in English-speaking countries could be fast-tracked through the UAE licensing system. Is this true?
    The MOE said it is still working on establishing equivalencies for expatriate teachers who hold a teaching qualification from some foreign countries. For now, all teachers will follow the same procedure to be licensed.
.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Golden Beach



Joined: 09 Jun 2016
Posts: 27

PostPosted: Thu Apr 12, 2018 3:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I hold qualified teacher status in the UK.

I have had my diplomas accredited by the UAE Embassy in London.

I personally am going to refuse to do any silly exams to prove what I can already legally demonstrate.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
veiledsentiments



Joined: 20 Feb 2003
Posts: 17604
Location: USA

PostPosted: Thu Apr 12, 2018 3:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

While I totally agree with you, if you want to teach there, it's their ball and their court...

And if they find that they can't get qualified British/American etc teachers because of their rule, it will get changed... eventually.

VS
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Golden Beach



Joined: 09 Jun 2016
Posts: 27

PostPosted: Thu Apr 12, 2018 4:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

veiledsentiments wrote:
While I totally agree with you, if you want to teach there, it's their ball and their court...

And if they find that they can't get qualified British/American etc teachers because of their rule, it will get changed... eventually.

VS


If they alienate all their teachers there won't be anyone left in their game......

Already most of the Aussies have quit.

Next will be the Americans.

The Brits and Irish are all hanging in there....but there's only so much bullshit we can eat without choking.

I'm actually doing really well here....they really can't afford to piss good teachers like me off...... and this is something they do not seem to be learning.... and eventually there will be no more teachers for them, they're burning through so many and there are not an infinite number of people willing to live and work in a distant hot and somewhat alien country, especially when they do not always hear good things about the job.

One can assume that the first wave of teachers were probably the best, but if they couldn't do the job, and if they get desperate to hire anyone, then how much less able to do the job will they be? And from then on it will be the law of diminishing returns, and they will end up having to turn to the Indian sub-continent for English teachers.

I play my game and I always win.

I bring my own balls.


Last edited by Golden Beach on Fri Apr 13, 2018 10:07 am; edited 1 time in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
nomad soul



Joined: 31 Jan 2010
Posts: 11355
Location: The real world

PostPosted: Thu Apr 12, 2018 5:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Golden Beach wrote:
I hold qualified teacher status in the UK.
....
I personally am going to refuse to do any silly exams to prove what I can already legally demonstrate.

Teachers with a western teaching credential that's current and valid (i.e., not obtained via an online program) will likely not have to take the exam. However, if it's a condition of your employment, then put your ego aside and take the test if you want to stay employed.

and wrote:
Eventually there will be no more teachers for them, they're burning through so many and there are not an infinite number of people willing to live and work in a distant hot and somewhat alien country, especially when they do not always hear good things about the job.

FYI: The licensing requirement is for all teachers in the UAE and not for any specific employer/school (AKA "them").
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Golden Beach



Joined: 09 Jun 2016
Posts: 27

PostPosted: Thu Apr 12, 2018 7:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

nomad soul wrote:
Golden Beach wrote:
I hold qualified teacher status in the UK.
....
I personally am going to refuse to do any silly exams to prove what I can already legally demonstrate.

Teachers with a western teaching credential that's current and valid (i.e., not obtained via an online program) will likely not have to take the exam. However, if it's a condition of your employment, then put your ego aside and take the test if you want to stay employed.

and wrote:
Eventually there will be no more teachers for them, they're burning through so many and there are not an infinite number of people willing to live and work in a distant hot and somewhat alien country, especially when they do not always hear good things about the job.

FYI: The licensing requirement is for all teachers in the UAE and not for any specific employer/school (AKA "them").


It's not an issue of ego, it's an issue of not wanting to work on Saturdays, which is where all this is heading in my opinion.

I do not have enough faith in the system to sit an exam which should I pass I will be 'free' and should I fail I will have to do training on weekends for the next 6 months...

They're trying to push people to do weekend training when we already do enough largely pointless training.....and it only gets worse and our holidays only get shorter...

I don't want to give anyone the excuse to take away my weekends.

They could say I have failed their exam. How could I prove otherwise?

Why are you shillling this so hard btw? You don't reflect opinion on the ground.

Who are you? Who do you work for?

Some recruitment company....? You've got a nerve telling us teachers what to do.


Last edited by Golden Beach on Fri Apr 13, 2018 9:38 am; edited 1 time in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
veiledsentiments



Joined: 20 Feb 2003
Posts: 17604
Location: USA

PostPosted: Fri Apr 13, 2018 4:30 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I would compare this to what the UAE government/ministry did to the professional teachers at HCT. It was about 2 years of ridiculous and expensive procedures to "prove" credentials that many had been teaching under there for 10 or more years. People with MAs and tons of experience... at the colleges..

There is no sense to this sort of stuff... They lost nearly all those great teachers and by the end, they decided that maybe they didn't really need all that ridiculous paperwork after all. Rolling Eyes

I don't see how you interpret that NS is "shilling" for them. She basically said the same thing that I did. They get to make the rules and enforce them as illogically as they wish. Over the last few years we've watched the Education Ministries of the UAE give hundreds of teachers the shaft and destroy what was a pretty decent job and institution.

Looks like you MOE teachers are sadly next on the chopping block.

VS
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
nomad soul



Joined: 31 Jan 2010
Posts: 11355
Location: The real world

PostPosted: Fri Apr 13, 2018 6:30 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Golden Beach wrote:
Why are you shillling this so hard btw? You don't reflect opinion on the ground.

My opinion about the UAE's educator licensure requirement is irrelevant. The move toward licensure is what it is.

This shouldn't turn into another "working for the MOE" thread; there are already plenty of posts about the challenges of teaching in the UAE's public schools. Besides, the country also has plenty of private international schools that recruit teachers from abroad. They're not exempt.

Just like doctors and nurses have to be licensed regardless of the hospital they work for, teachers have to hold specific credentials as well to teach in private and public schools. Like it or hate it, the MOE is just following western educational systems by standardizing educator requirements. (See Qualifications to be a teacher.) Regardless, it's doubtful expats holding legit teacher quals from western countries will be required to take the exams.

Additionally, formal classroom observations and continuing education/professional development are the norm for k12 teachers in the US, especially for renewal of their licenses, which carry an expiration date. Maybe that's not the case in the UK.

Keep in mind, Emiratisation is still a priority. This licensure requirement helps move that national initiative forward.
.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
veiledsentiments



Joined: 20 Feb 2003
Posts: 17604
Location: USA

PostPosted: Fri Apr 13, 2018 4:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

nomad soul wrote:
Regardless, it's doubtful expats holding legit teacher quals from western countries will be required to take the exams.

That remains to be seen. The logical assumptions are no longer to be relied upon with this education ministry. Perhaps they learned their lesson when they lost so many good teachers at the tertiary level with illogical requirements... or perhaps they will again not learn until all the licensed western teachers are gone.

VS
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Golden Beach



Joined: 09 Jun 2016
Posts: 27

PostPosted: Fri Apr 13, 2018 5:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well all I can say is that I hope I won't have to do any daft exams.

There are a lot of good people working for the MOE, in fact most people working for the MOE are good people.

But the point is they hired qualified teachers..... I think they've forgotten that somehow. We're already trained and ready to go....that's what we've been doing with our lives, being teachers... the MOE seems to have an idea that we are all clueless about teaching and need to be filled up with a pedagogy which we already know 100 times over....... The problems we are experiencing in our schools will not be solved by giving more burdens to the teachers, and I can only hope that the real issues in the schools are being addressed behind the scenes.

All of the Cycle 2 and Cycle 3 teachers I've met, both locals, Arabs and native English speakers, all more or less seem to know what they're doing and are doing the best they can do in difficult circumstances.

So I'm just not really sure why they seem to think there is a problem with us that needs addressing with more tiresome not to mention stressful 'assessment' and paper-chasing.

The real problems with the schools are known to anyone who spends more than five minutes in one......
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
veiledsentiments



Joined: 20 Feb 2003
Posts: 17604
Location: USA

PostPosted: Sat Apr 14, 2018 12:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Golden Beach wrote:
But the point is they hired qualified teachers..... I think they've forgotten that somehow. We're already trained and ready to go....

Which is exactly what they had with the highly professional tertiary teachers... many with MAs and with 10+ years of experience... in the Gulf university systems. They threw a few hundred teachers under the bus... and out of the country... by requiring onerous and expensive re-certifications of their previously certified (before hire) educational credentials... like back to primary and secondary school. (there was more chicanery going on... if you are interested check out this thread on their progression on destroying an education system: http://forums.eslcafe.com/job/viewtopic.php?t=110713 )

I hope common sense prevails and that they learned something with that debacle. They are finally getting some improvement in their schools after all these years of work, but they can quickly undo any progress that they have made.

VS
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
dragonpiwo



Joined: 04 Mar 2013
Posts: 1600
Location: Berlin

PostPosted: Thu Apr 19, 2018 4:41 am    Post subject: erm Reply with quote

1.) There are plenty of South African teachers willing to do all this. They earn a king's ransom here and the whites have a lot of incentives to leave South Africa. (I have quite a few SA friends here and some family there).
2.) If you have a PGCE or BEd, yes it is daft. However, there are plenty of Arab/Asian chancers here with dodgy quals.
3.) The big cheeses fix everything except the problem, so crack on. Meanwhile, we sacrifice dignity for money. TEFL is the oldest profession in the world in that sense although I shudder to call it a profession.

To be honest, I have been in the Gulf and North Africa for almost 20 years and it is getting worse and worse as a teaching destination. All this bother with certs, QMS procedures and endless ISO, targets, KPIs, pointless development in which people try to re-invent the wheel by calling it something different and using 2018 jargon. Also, the benefits are going down while life costs more and more. Since the 5% VAT increase prices seem to haver gone up way higher (taxis almost doubled on my usual trip and smokes have too) and although I earn quite a bit more than your ADEC or MOE teacher, we hardly save these days and we do not have kids here. We do not do the party expat thing either. I think for many old timers (I am still under 50), the bucket MOD EDIT now outweighs the bucket of money.

Stay in America or the UK, build a pension, enjoy your teaching in a place you will be valued. Good international schools pay well everywhere.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Job Discussion Forums Forum Index -> United Arab Emirates All times are GMT
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


This page is maintained by the one and only Dave Sperling.
Contact Dave's ESL Cafe
Copyright © 2018 Dave Sperling. All Rights Reserved.

Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2002 phpBB Group

Teaching Jobs in China
Teaching Jobs in China