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Life after TEFL?
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nomad soul



Joined: 31 Jan 2010
Posts: 11384
Location: The real world

PostPosted: Mon Jul 09, 2018 5:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

dragonpiwo wrote:
I'd go back to studying and get an HR qualification with some sort of Learning and Development modules. Loads of jobs and a step up from what you're doing.

I'm working with Learning and Development guys as a Coordinator supporting training solutions right now( courses, work placements, OJT etc). It's interesting and still 'teaching related' in some senses.

It's good you finally realized you'd need to pursue further studies/professional development if you wanted to stay competitive in the field of training development.

BTW, although there's some overlap, teaching relates to knowledge acquisition, whereas training focuses on improving work performance/practical skills.
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dragonpiwo



Joined: 04 Mar 2013
Posts: 1609
Location: Berlin

PostPosted: Mon Jul 09, 2018 7:13 am    Post subject: Sorry to the guru. Reply with quote

That's funny because our training model is based on experience, exposure and education, which is a mix of your 'training' and your 'teaching' definitions. The overlap is considerable.

To be an English teacher, a CELTA, a brain, some personality and 5 years experience is all anyone needs to be 'good'.

The OP is talking about getting out of TEFL. That requires courses /vocational qualifications /certification. I never suggested otherwise.

However, I have consistently suggested an Ma in Applied Linguistics is about as useful as a pork sauasage at a bar mitzvah.
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nomad soul



Joined: 31 Jan 2010
Posts: 11384
Location: The real world

PostPosted: Mon Jul 09, 2018 7:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

dragonpiwo wrote:
That's funny because our training model is based on experience, exposure and education, which is a mix of your 'training' and your 'teaching' definitions. The overlap is considerable.

To be an English teacher, a CELTA, a brain, some personality and 5 years experience is all anyone needs to be 'good'.

The OP is talking about getting out of TEFL. That requires courses /vocational qualifications /certification. I never suggested otherwise.

However, I have consistently suggested an Ma in Applied Linguistics is about as useful as a pork sauasage at a bar mitzvah.

My post was in response to your comment about workplace L&D and not about the qualifications for TESOL.

And since you brought it up, I know two MA Applied Ling holders -- one is an eLearning developer while the other a technical writer. Neither has been a teacher.
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dragonpiwo



Joined: 04 Mar 2013
Posts: 1609
Location: Berlin

PostPosted: Mon Jul 09, 2018 8:23 am    Post subject: ha Reply with quote

That may be why so many of the e-learning/blended learning prgrammes don't work and why so many of the technical materials are appalling.

Last edited by dragonpiwo on Tue Jul 10, 2018 4:13 am; edited 1 time in total
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nomad soul



Joined: 31 Jan 2010
Posts: 11384
Location: The real world

PostPosted: Mon Jul 09, 2018 9:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

dragonpiwo wrote:
That may be why so many of the e-learning/blended learning prgrammes don't work and why do many of the technical materials are so appalling.

Uh, so many of them where and for which companies? Seriously, dude, that generalization is so ludicrous. But if it makes you feel relevant... Rolling Eyes

Anyway, the OP hasn't posted in six weeks. However, others probably have some ideas for careers post-TESOL.
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In the heat of the moment



Joined: 22 May 2015
Posts: 376
Location: Africa

PostPosted: Mon Jul 09, 2018 6:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

nomad soul wrote:
dragonpiwo wrote:
That may be why so many of the e-learning/blended learning prgrammes don't work and why do many of the technical materials are so appalling.

Uh, so many of them where and for which companies? Seriously, dude, that generalization is so ludicrous. But if it makes you feel relevant... Rolling Eyes

Anyway, the OP hasn't posted in six weeks. However, others probably have some ideas for careers post-TESOL.


(my bolding)

I'm not sure they do, and why would they? If you're a pipe fitter it's unlikely you'd easily change career, being a chef means you'd probably have to stay in the same industry and move to administration, a customer services agent isn't going to magically become a doctor, an actuary won't seamlessly become a lawyer, an optometrist isn't going to think "This is getting boring, I think I'll try teeth!", and a coder is unlikely to go into building.

I'm not saying those couldn't happen, but people often stay in the same industry for years for a reason. To me the question is answered simply 'Senior teacher, assistant DoS, DoS, Head of department, admin, writing materials, open a school, teacher trainer, and that's about it'.
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Yanklonigan



Joined: 23 Jan 2017
Posts: 35

PostPosted: Tue Jul 10, 2018 12:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I couldn't agree more with your post, In the Heat of the Moment. From my own experiences and observations, we're quickly branded with an occupation. It's even very difficult to make the jump from middle school teaching to community college teaching to university teaching. It isn't impossible, but very improvable.

Perhaps there still exist jobs out there that require a check in a box for education and calls for certain skills that a teacher would have developed during their teaching days: presentation & writing skills, organizational & leadership skills and so on. Maybe in the sectors of public relations, sales and a few other places.

I think age, appearances and personality could factor in.
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Yanklonigan



Joined: 23 Jan 2017
Posts: 35

PostPosted: Tue Jul 10, 2018 3:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Life after English Teaching does exist. There are millions of job openings in the world. All you need is one job. Having your boots on the ground and a resume in hand is the start.
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Vince



Joined: 05 May 2003
Posts: 553
Location: U.S.

PostPosted: Wed Jul 11, 2018 2:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

One option is to branch out to another area within education. You could get into curriculum development, school administration, etc. Both would require a masters if you want to be well placed, but it might be worth it to maintain that basic career continuity.

If you want to get out of education entirely, I'd second the recommendation for IT. You can do certifications via self-study for much less than a masters would cost. In fact, I've read that degrees in IT aren't that important, and that certifications along with a bachelors in a humanity are regarded highly. Of course, that varies from place to place. Cutting edge IT businesses are probably more likely to prefer a degree in IT or other STEM field, but those places are hardly the only avenue into IT. You aren't at the age where it becomes an issue when trying to start a career in a new field - but don't dawdle, because that age will be upon you before you know it.
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yurii



Joined: 12 Jan 2017
Posts: 92

PostPosted: Thu Jul 12, 2018 6:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yanklonigan wrote:
Life after _______________________ does exist. There are millions of job openings in the world. All you need is one job. Having your boots on the ground and a resume in hand is the start.


By that token we could simply remove your job and say it for any profession! Bricklayer, cleaner, doctor, office worker...
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Kalkstein



Joined: 25 Aug 2016
Posts: 66

PostPosted: Sun Jul 15, 2018 5:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Vince wrote:
One option is to branch out to another area within education. You could get into curriculum development, school administration, etc. Both would require a masters if you want to be well placed, but it might be worth it to maintain that basic career continuity.

If you want to get out of education entirely, I'd second the recommendation for IT. You can do certifications via self-study for much less than a masters would cost. In fact, I've read that degrees in IT aren't that important, and that certifications along with a bachelors in a humanity are regarded highly. Of course, that varies from place to place. Cutting edge IT businesses are probably more likely to prefer a degree in IT or other STEM field, but those places are hardly the only avenue into IT. You aren't at the age where it becomes an issue when trying to start a career in a new field - but don't dawdle, because that age will be upon you before you know it.


I don't know where you've read that but it's completely false. I worked in IT prior to becoming a teacher, the only types of degrees wanted are; IT/Maths/Psychics generally. Anything that proves you can think logically. Maths and Physics students also have usually programmed at some point in their major. A bachelor's in humanity is completely worthless to most employers in that field. This is the low end employers, the decent employers won't touch anyone with major experience or a degree in IT.

Yanklonigan wrote:
Life after English Teaching does exist. There are millions of job openings in the world. All you need is one job. Having your boots on the ground and a resume in hand is the start.


Sure million of jobs in Warehouses and McDonalds earning minimum wage, if that sort of thing works for you. Decent paying jobs generally require qualifications and experience. Someone with only TEFL experience a psychology degree (like the OP) is rather limited in what they can hope for without getting re-qualified.
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voyagerksa



Joined: 29 Apr 2015
Posts: 93

PostPosted: Tue Jul 17, 2018 12:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Id strongly avoid pursuing degrees that are TEFL related the jobs r shifting to China, in general chinese are quiet appreciative of subject matter degrees their is plenty of chinese that need to be taught english for subject matters.
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Vince



Joined: 05 May 2003
Posts: 553
Location: U.S.

PostPosted: Wed Aug 22, 2018 9:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Kalkstein wrote:
I don't know where you've read that but it's completely false.

I think I read it on a general message forum where people were talking about how to get into IT. People who said they were in the field were discussing their experience.

I don't know the field beyond the occasional things I've heard from other people. My own anecdote is that two of the IT guys in my office have IT certifications and a degree in music. But I'm sure the higher jobs want IT degrees, and that degrees in other quantitative fields are highly valued too. Maybe the person who said humanities degrees were valued was talking more about less intensive tech-support jobs where communicating with non-tech savvy end users was important.
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