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Few Jobs in Germany
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scot47



Joined: 10 Jan 2003
Posts: 11725
Location: Ultima Thule

PostPosted: Mon May 26, 2003 5:21 am    Post subject: Few Jobs in Germany Reply with quote

Not many posts and I think that indicates that not much is happening on the job front in Germany. The "Wirtschaftswunder" is over and since the heady days of unification, things have gone downhill. More than 10 percent registered unemployed. And that is in an economy where native speaker teachers were marginal to English teaching even before the economic downturn.

Looks like anyone interested will have to head elsewhere. Saudi Arabia anyone ?
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No Moss



Joined: 15 Apr 2003
Posts: 1995
Location: Thailand

PostPosted: Mon May 26, 2003 6:56 am    Post subject: No Jobs? Reply with quote

Hi, Scot47

I think you've made your point that you believe there are no jobs in Germany. It is almost certainly true that you won't make enough to support your dependents teaching English in Germany.

I'm not sure of your purpose in making so many negative posts. Your opinion appears to be in the minority. It would seem to me that though there may be no new job growth in TEFL, there should be opportunities due to the fact that required pension contributions are running some teachers out of Germany.

Incidentally, I'm over 55. Does anyone know if that exempts me from pension contributions? (I'm American).

Also, is the job situation OK in Berlin? What could I expect to make per hour doing free-lance and privates?

Thanks for any replies.

A rolling stone gathers no moss.
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scot47



Joined: 10 Jan 2003
Posts: 11725
Location: Ultima Thule

PostPosted: Mon May 26, 2003 8:42 am    Post subject: negative realism Reply with quote

I think I am being realistic and a touch of realism is NECESSARY, with capital letters, in a market place which is full of unrealistic Pollyanna-type messages. Too many newcomers really believe all this hype about there being jobs everywhere and anywhere.

You may not have noticed but there is an international recession. That has had a huge effect on the job market for TEFL teachers like everyone else.

As for exemption from social insurance while working in Germany you could check if there is a special agreement between the USA and the Federal Republic. I think it unlikely. Is that being negative too ?
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Hod



Joined: 28 Apr 2003
Posts: 883
Location: Home

PostPosted: Mon May 26, 2003 10:07 am    Post subject: .... Reply with quote

Actually Scot47, my school also teaches unemployed people on behalf of the Arbeitsamt but I agree with you. Germany can be OK of you are single and from the UK. Saying that, ask me again in a year.

What I’ve never understood are the number of North Americans wanting to come here. Whilst an EU Citizen, e.g. a Brit, can just show up and freely work, the paperwork for their transatlantic colleagues is horrendous. For this reason, most schools would only consider a non-EU teacher in exceptional circumstances.

Germany’s OK but I wouldn’t cross the Atlantic to teach here. Can some North-Americans tell me the attraction, please?


Last edited by Hod on Mon May 26, 2003 11:02 am; edited 1 time in total
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scot47



Joined: 10 Jan 2003
Posts: 11725
Location: Ultima Thule

PostPosted: Mon May 26, 2003 10:45 am    Post subject: North American Immigrants Reply with quote

Hod
I am not sure why there are so many North American would-be immigrants to Germany. The fact that work permits are difficult to get does not yet seem to have struck home with our transatlantic cousins.
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schminken



Joined: 06 May 2003
Posts: 109
Location: Austria (The Hills are Alive)

PostPosted: Mon May 26, 2003 2:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm also not sure why North Americans want to go to Germany. Maybe it's because so many people have roots there and are culturally interested. In school, one usually has the choice to take Spanish, French, or German and maybe we get interested that way. That's what happened to me. I started taking German courses and never stopped. Then I figured out there was not much you could do with a MA in German so then I decided teaching English was the route to take. So here I am. Well not in Deutschland but in Österreich.

I have heard that teaching jobs in Germany are basically freelance contracts. Is this true? What's the Fachhochschule scene like?
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No Moss



Joined: 15 Apr 2003
Posts: 1995
Location: Thailand

PostPosted: Tue May 27, 2003 4:38 am    Post subject: Germany just for the Brits? Reply with quote

Well, I'm not sure of the agenda here, but let me say first that many Americans (myself included) have a German heritage which is far more recent than the average British.

Also, you can obtain a residence permit and work (legally) as an American--you're just self-employed. I haven't been to Germany to work, but the research I have done indicates that it is doable. You do have to comply with the tax regulations, pension, and health insurance requirements.

But it would be nice to hear from someone with something positive to say!
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scot47



Joined: 10 Jan 2003
Posts: 11725
Location: Ultima Thule

PostPosted: Tue May 27, 2003 10:53 am    Post subject: something positive Reply with quote

"It would be nice to hear something positive"

Ah, but what if there is nothing positive ? Are you one of those POLLYANNA types who wants to be positive even when everything is negative ? For native speakers, especially non-EU passport holders, there is little positive to say about the employment position in Germany.

If you can find something I wish you well, but heed my warnings !


Last edited by scot47 on Wed May 28, 2003 10:57 am; edited 1 time in total
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panisusi



Joined: 03 May 2003
Posts: 1
Location: Europe

PostPosted: Tue May 27, 2003 3:25 pm    Post subject: Specialization in business...better? Reply with quote

I was wondering if it's easier to get work if one can teach business English, or even business subjects (in English). I worked in Germany from 1997-2001, with a U.S. college program there, and know from my experience with the Arbeitsamt and helping students find jobs that it depends a lot on the organization that wants to hire you and its "clout" with the local labor office. For example, if ABC GmbH absolutely needs someone with specific qualification it's easier for them to get a work permit. One of our students from Japan, for example, who spoke fluent German and English as well, was able to choose between 3 job offers.
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scot47



Joined: 10 Jan 2003
Posts: 11725
Location: Ultima Thule

PostPosted: Wed May 28, 2003 4:48 am    Post subject: why hire a yank ? Reply with quote

Why should an employer go to the bother of all the paperwork involved, when he can hire a UK or Irish citizen with less paperwork ?

Unless you have something special to offer, forget. A job at university level teaching American Studies (Amerikanistik) but you will need serious academic qualifications for that including a doctorate and a string of publications.

As for teaching "Business English", maybe but remember that there is a recession on. The biggest to hit Germany since 1931.


Last edited by scot47 on Wed May 28, 2003 10:59 am; edited 1 time in total
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Hod



Joined: 28 Apr 2003
Posts: 883
Location: Home

PostPosted: Wed May 28, 2003 10:51 am    Post subject: POSITIVE Reply with quote

Far too many people talking about the lack of POSITIVE posts. Not guilty. Let’s get POSITIVE. (There’s a two-day holiday starting tomorrow).

Working in Germany before will be an advantage. Your first hurdle is getting an employer’s attention. This’ll be easier if you’re in Germany. Schools mightn’t take an application from North America seriously. Paperwork aside, the chances are that the teacher won’t turn up.

Alas, unqualified people who’d never set foot in a company are teaching “Business English” in a lot of schools. Saying you’re a Business English teacher wouldn’t raise too many eyebrows. As you’ve said, it’s better to be more specific, e.g. a North American with a financial background would almost certainly land a job in Frankfurt. A few schools sell American English courses. Whilst this sounds a bit gimmicky, there must be a demand and a North American would be preferred.

In your case, I’d phone a few schools in Germany. They might say no but I’m sure they’ll spare a few minutes to offer advice or other POSITIVE leads.
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jud



Joined: 25 May 2003
Posts: 127
Location: Italy

PostPosted: Sat May 31, 2003 1:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I lived in Berlin from 1995 to 1999 and was married to a German. Now I live in Italy and teach English here (in Germany I didn't). Oh gee, and I'm American.

While in Germany in 1999, one of my closest friends was teaching English. She still is. Granted, she has ten years experience. Oh, and by the way, she's American. She also had a number of colleagues, fresh from CELTA training, who, oh gee, were American. They're still there, still teaching.

By all accounts, Germany, unlike Italy, is rather friendly to Americans with a letter of intention from a school. I'm not calling myself an expert, and believe me I'm far from patriotic. However, Scott 47 seems to have some kind of agenda OR a beef. With all the American multinationals these days, for better or worse, American English is no niche market.
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scot47



Joined: 10 Jan 2003
Posts: 11725
Location: Ultima Thule

PostPosted: Sat May 31, 2003 4:57 am    Post subject: agendas Reply with quote

"an agenda" ? You mean that I have something to say ? Yes I do. I want to point out that not everything is rosy in this EFL world, and that we should not believe all this advertising hype about a job on every corner.

I find it annoying that during an inetrnational recession when times are tough some people seem incapable of seeing the harsh reality that is before their eyes. Jobs are tough in Germany. They are even tougher if you are not a EU citizen. To ignore these factors in the job market is foolish.

Scot47 with one "t" if you don't mind. It is a descriptor of my nationality not a name. Culturally it is important that you get names right. In Business English accuracy in things like this is crucial. See how far you get teaching "American Business English" if you can't get customers names right !!!!!
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jud



Joined: 25 May 2003
Posts: 127
Location: Italy

PostPosted: Sat May 31, 2003 11:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Excuse me for mispelling your name. Do you teach your business students that it's culturally appropriate to attack when their name is mispelled?

Actually, I teach business English. Stop. To use with Americans, Japanese people, Australians, and even Scots. We (our school, and I as a teacher) have many satisfied clients.

I also do First and Proficiency Certificate Prep.

In any case, no one has said everything is rosy in the TEFL world. However, nationalistic comments and general naysaying in the face of the most simple questions is more a reflection of one's general dissatisfaction than one's realism.

By the way, I don't know many new teachers who entered the profession to get rich. Most realize that they will not be well-compensated and are looking for helpful, practical advice.
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Ferne



Joined: 29 Apr 2003
Posts: 177
Location: GZ

PostPosted: Sun Jul 06, 2003 6:30 pm    Post subject: Re: Few Jobs in Germany Reply with quote

scot47 wrote:
The "Wirtschaftswunder" is over


Scot...the Wirtschaftswunder was in the Fifties...were you still looking for it now? lol
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