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British Council Morocco?
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steady



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 72
Location: Morocco

PostPosted: Thu Dec 28, 2006 9:17 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Africaexpert wrote:
Yes, but I believe they require English to be the native tongue. I've seen Brits, Aussies, Canadians, even Scottish working there.



Africaexpert,

Scottish (sic) are indeed Brits.

Also, 'Scots' is the plural noun form - the adjective is 'Scottish'.
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Africaexpert



Joined: 19 May 2003
Posts: 109

PostPosted: Sat Dec 30, 2006 12:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Dictionary.com says differently.
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Africaexpert



Joined: 19 May 2003
Posts: 109

PostPosted: Sat Dec 30, 2006 12:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
If, with your masters and all, you still needed a side gig for your comfy life, is it fair to say your main job had a perhaps less than good salary? Also, I thought you liked Morocco? Why work so much and miss out on all the fun and quality times? Oh yes, and if Morocco is good, why aren't you there? Just curious.


I'm used to working many more hours than I ever had to in Morocco - My work provided a decent living and time to enjoy it. Although I had personal/family reasons for leaving, I do expect to return to Morocco eventually and plan to retire there.
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steady



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 72
Location: Morocco

PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2007 9:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Africaexpert wrote:
Dictionary.com says differently.


Oxford Concise Dictionary

SCOTTISH Noun when preceded by the; treated as plural.
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Africaexpert



Joined: 19 May 2003
Posts: 109

PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2007 8:51 pm    Post subject: Dictionary.com Reply with quote

4 results for: Scottish

Dictionary.com Unabridged (v 1.1) - Cite This Source
Scot·tish /ˈskɒtɪʃ/ Pronunciation Key - Show Spelled Pronunciation[skot-ish] Pronunciation Key - Show IPA Pronunciation
–adjective 1. Also, Scots. of or pertaining to Scotland, its people, or their language.
–noun 2. the people of Scotland.
3. Scots (def. 1).


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

[Origin: bef. 900; ME < LL Scott(us) Scot + -ish1; r. OE Scyttisc]

—Related forms
Scot·tish·ly, adverb
Scot·tish·ness, noun


—Usage note See Scotch.
Dictionary.com Unabridged (v 1.1)
Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2006.
Dictionary.com Unabridged (v 1.1) - Cite This Source
Scots /skɒts/ Pronunciation Key - Show Spelled Pronunciation[skots] Pronunciation Key - Show IPA Pronunciation
–noun 1. Also called Scottish. the English language as spoken in Scotland. Compare Scots Gaelic.
–adjective 2. Scottish (def. 1).


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

[Origin: 1325–75; syncopated form of Scottis, ME, var. (north) of Scottish]


—Usage note See Scotch.
Dictionary.com Unabridged (v 1.1)
Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2006.
American Heritage Dictionary - Cite This Source Scot·tish (skŏt'ĭsh) Pronunciation Key
adj. Of or relating to Scotland or its people, language, or culture.

n.
Scots English.
(used with a pl. verb) The people of Scotland.


[Middle English scottisc; see Scots.]


Usage Note: Scottish is the full, original form of the adjective. Scots is an old Scottish variant. Scotch is an English contraction of Scottish that came into use in Scotland as well for a time (as in Burns's "O thou, my Muse! guid auld Scotch drink!") but subsequently fell into disfavor there. In the interest of civility, forms involving Scotch are best avoided in reference to people; designations formed with Scots are most common (Scot, Scotsman, or Scotswoman), but those involving the full form Scottish are sometimes found in more formal contexts. Scotch-Irish is the most commonly used term for the descendants of Scots who migrated to North America, but lately Scots-Irish has begun to gain currency among those who know that Scotch is considered offensive in Scotland. There is, however, no sure rule for referring to things, since the history of variation in the use of these words has left many expressions in which the choice is fixed, such as Scotch broth, Scotch whisky, Scottish rite, and Scots Guards.

(Download Now or Buy the Book) The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition
Copyright © 2000 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
WordNet - Cite This Source scottish

adjective
1. of or relating to or characteristic of Scotland or its people or culture or its English dialect or Gaelic language; "Scots Gaelic"; "the Scots community in New York"; "'Scottish' tends to be the more formal term as in 'The Scottish Symphony' or 'Scottish authors' or 'Scottish mountains'"; "'Scotch' is in disfavor with Scottish people and is used primarily outside Scotland except in such frozen phrases as 'Scotch broth' or 'Scotch whiskey' or 'Scotch plaid'" [syn: Scots]

noun
1. the dialect of English used in Scotland

WordNet® 2.1, © 2005 Princeton University
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steady



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 72
Location: Morocco

PostPosted: Fri Jan 05, 2007 9:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

This should probably go onto another thread.

Your evidence shows 4 results.

RESULT 1 shows Scottish to be an adjective and a noun. The noun version being 'the people of Scotland' - therefore it takes the definite article: the Scottish

RESULT 2 refers to the noun form when defining 'Scottish' as the language, not the people

RESULT 3 discusses the forms of Scotch and Scots

RESULT 4 defines 'Scottish' (noun) as the dialect of English used in Scotland

OCD agrees with this. The form of Scottish, when used as a noun referring to the poeple of Scotland, must be preceded by 'the'.
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Africaexpert



Joined: 19 May 2003
Posts: 109

PostPosted: Fri Jan 05, 2007 9:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

"Also, Scots. of or pertaining to Scotland, its people, or their language"

No article used there.
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Africaexpert



Joined: 19 May 2003
Posts: 109

PostPosted: Fri Jan 05, 2007 11:28 pm    Post subject: Forget that last post. Reply with quote

You added the emphasis - the dictionary did not, and they did not need the srticle either. Therefore, until you have published a successful dictionary. I'll go with what they said. Scottish.
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steady



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 72
Location: Morocco

PostPosted: Sat Jan 06, 2007 1:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Africaexpert wrote:
"Also, Scots. of or pertaining to Scotland, its people, or their language"

No article used there.


That is the ADJECTIVE definition of your first result. You seem to be very confused.
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steady



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 72
Location: Morocco

PostPosted: Sat Jan 06, 2007 1:02 pm    Post subject: Re: Forget that last post. Reply with quote

Africaexpert wrote:
You added the emphasis - the dictionary did not, and they did not need the srticle either. Therefore, until you have published a successful dictionary. I'll go with what they said. Scottish.


I added no emphasis. You just mixed up nouns and adjectives. No need to wait until I publish a dictionary - just pay attention when you read the existing ones.
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ElMaghrebi



Joined: 26 Apr 2007
Posts: 10

PostPosted: Sun Apr 29, 2007 9:04 pm    Post subject: Re: Question of nationality Reply with quote

medina wrote:
This is in response to the earlier question about whether ALCs hire non-Americans, etc.

The situation in Morocco for English teachers in general is that it's getting harder and harder to get a work permit from the Ministry of Labor. There's a new step in the process where a newly created office has to decide whether the job being applied for can be filled by a Moroccan. So if you're not from an anglophone country, you're likely to get turned down, because they've got thousands of Moroccans who need jobs.



I'm Moroccan by origin and also got La card national (The Moroccan ID)

but I live in The Netherlands(I've got a Dutch passport), I've got an American accent (when I speak English) and in the near future I'm planning on going abroad to the U.S to work on my English.

Do I have shot on working in Morocco when I've got the necessary papers to show for?

I'm just wondering what my chances are for the future Very Happy
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medina



Joined: 04 Jun 2005
Posts: 64
Location: Morocco

PostPosted: Wed May 02, 2007 9:07 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

To El Maghribi's question

With Moroccan nationality, TEFL qualifications, and good English, I don't see why not? But keep in mind that English teachers---Moroccan or foreign---are not exactly getting rich here Smile --- especially a married couple if only one is working, and especially if you wind up in a city like Casablanca where it's really easy to spend money. So please, friend, Measure twice and cut once, look before you leap, (and all the rest of those homilies!).
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Winston Bear



Joined: 18 Apr 2007
Posts: 14

PostPosted: Wed May 02, 2007 9:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Although most schools give preference to native speakers, the ALC has a few and AmidEast has at least one.
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ElMaghrebi



Joined: 26 Apr 2007
Posts: 10

PostPosted: Fri May 04, 2007 9:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

medina wrote:
To El Maghribi's question

With Moroccan nationality, TEFL qualifications, and good English, I don't see why not? But keep in mind that English teachers---Moroccan or foreign---are not exactly getting rich here Smile --- especially a married couple if only one is working, and especially if you wind up in a city like Casablanca where it's really easy to spend money. So please, friend, Measure twice and cut once, look before you leap, (and all the rest of those homilies!).


I'm not into it for the money, I'm using it as a leaphole to enter the Gulf world. If that's possible that is..
I just need a little bit of experience within a Arab country.

And if you earn about 800 or 900 euro's a month, you're like a king in Morocco even when you're married.

It even helps when your dad has a nice amount of property in Morocco Wink LOL
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ElMaghrebi



Joined: 26 Apr 2007
Posts: 10

PostPosted: Fri May 04, 2007 9:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Winston Bear wrote:
Although most schools give preference to native speakers, the ALC has a few and AmidEast has at least one.


Yeah I know, that's why I'm planning to travel to a English speaking country so that my English can improve big time in a way I cannot be rejected by my knowledge and speaking ability.
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