Site Search:
 
TEFL International Supports Dave's ESL Cafe
TEFL Courses, TESOL Course, English Teaching Jobs - TEFL International
Job Discussion Forums Forum Index Job Discussion Forums
"The Internet's Meeting Place for ESL/EFL Students and Teachers from Around the World!"
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

I have a few questions...

 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Job Discussion Forums Forum Index -> Italy
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
Il Gattopardo



Joined: 06 Oct 2009
Posts: 5
Location: Asia

PostPosted: Thu Oct 08, 2009 3:56 am    Post subject: I have a few questions... Reply with quote

Hi everyone. I'm a first time poster here so I apologise if a lot of what I ask has been queried before.

To give you a bit of background detail, I'm a Brit; did a TEFL course in Rome in 2006. Since then, I have had a brief and rather unsatisfying ESL experience in Eastern Europe.

I am currently teaching in Asia, working a contract for a Public School, which I'll complete at the fag-end of August 2010.

I speak Italian to an Intermediate level, but that should hopefully be leaning towards Advanced by the time next summer comes around.

My goal is to secure employment from mid to late September in Rome. I want to be in Italy, ideally, for at least three years and possibly longer if I can up my salary from the average offered by private language schools.

My questions are...

1) Is it feasible, as an EU Citizen, that I can secure a job in the ESL industry in Italy without a face to face interview?

I know a lot of schools seems to hire late, but I'd really like to have a firm offer in hand next summer before I head over. I don't really want to relocate and be unemployed on arrival.

2) If I can indeed secure a job with no face to face interview, when is the best time to start applying for jobs next year?

3) Is it possible to cover rent and utilities for about 450 a month in Rome?

4) If you work for a private language school, could you give me a brief idea of the following;

a) How many hours do you teach a week? Same location, or different locations?

b) How long are your classes?

c) What duration of time do you spend lesson planning each week?

5) Despite the somewhat poor wages, do you enjoy Italy and feel that you have a 'good quality of life'?

Sorry to ramble on, I'd appreciate any answers anyone can give.

Have a good day!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Il Gattopardo



Joined: 06 Oct 2009
Posts: 5
Location: Asia

PostPosted: Thu Oct 15, 2009 12:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sad

If anyone could take five minutes out of their day to answer a few of the above questions it'd be greatly appreciated. Thanks Very Happy
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
spiral78



Joined: 05 Apr 2004
Posts: 9639
Location: On a Short Leash

PostPosted: Thu Oct 15, 2009 6:06 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I can give you some general info on one of your points:

No, it is highly unlikely that you will get a job in advance of getting to Italy. It's not a matter of being an EU citizen (necessary, too!) but simply that there are teachers in Rome, and there's no need for a school to go out on a limb to hire anyone sight-unseen.

Any employer who offers someone a contract from abroad should be looked at with suspicion, as it may well be a sign that local teachers know better than to work for that employer.

The important exception to the general situation described above is in the case of a teacher with specialist qualifications. From what you describe, you don't have that.

I think your best course of action is to send CVs around in June/July and try to line up some interviews. But I think it highly unlikely that anyone will give you a contract (or promise you one) in advance. This is just the norm for Europe in general.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Il Gattopardo



Joined: 06 Oct 2009
Posts: 5
Location: Asia

PostPosted: Thu Oct 15, 2009 7:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks a lot Spiral78, point noted.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Teacher in Rome



Joined: 09 Jul 2003
Posts: 1216

PostPosted: Thu Oct 15, 2009 5:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Completely agree with Spiral. Here are some other notes

1) Is it feasible, as an EU Citizen, that I can secure a job in the ESL industry in Italy without a face to face interview?

Unlikely - not the good ones at least.

I know a lot of schools seems to hire late, but I'd really like to have a firm offer in hand next summer before I head over. I don't really want to relocate and be unemployed on arrival.

Bear in mind that schools close mid July and start again mid September.

2) If I can indeed secure a job with no face to face interview, when is the best time to start applying for jobs next year?

Mid July (if teachers have told schools they're not available for upcoming school year) or beginning September. Go in and solve someone's hiring problem.

3) Is it possible to cover rent and utilities for about 450 a month in Rome?

How much in euros is that? I guess around 500 depending on ever variable currency conversions. No - not enough. Rent alone will be that (in a shared flat). On top calculate for food and bills and fun. And you'll have a lot of fun in Rome!

4) If you work for a private language school, could you give me a brief idea of the following;

OK, I used to, but don't anymore. My info is likely to be out of date, but I don't think working conditions have changed that much.

a) How many hours do you teach a week? Same location, or different locations?

If you worked for one school, a 20 hour week is considered standard, but on the low side. Bear in mind that classes can and do get cancelled, so build in extra hours to cover you for this. If you work solely at language schools, also bear in mind that you'll be working for max ten months a year, so working your a** off for those ten months to pay rent etc for the slack periods.

Different locations mostly. Expect a lot of travelling around between classes. The metro will become your friend.

b) How long are your classes?

One hour generally is the paid unit.

c) What duration of time do you spend lesson planning each week?

With such low salaries, as little as possible. Planning time is not paid time.

5) Despite the somewhat poor wages, do you enjoy Italy and feel that you have a 'good quality of life'?

I do, but many others don't. I love Rome, Romans, the chaos and warmth, the food, the climate and the humanity of people. I hate what's happening right now with the crappy politics, the huge unemployment figures and desperation of those who can only get unpaid internships after studying for years. I hate the petty bureaucracy, the shrugging of shoulders and apathy, the increasing racism and bigotry. But then something happens - a joke, a random act of kindness - and I realise that I wouldn't want to be anywhere else.

Anyway, despite all that, the best way to stay afloat financially here (or anywhere else) is to have a diversified income stream. By all means work in language schools, but also think about getting work in the state sector, in EU-funded projects, or privately. Oh, and did I say, enjoy Rome?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
SueH



Joined: 01 Feb 2003
Posts: 1022
Location: Northern Italy

PostPosted: Thu Oct 15, 2009 9:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Seconded, from the far North - particularly the last two paragraphs..
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Il Gattopardo



Joined: 06 Oct 2009
Posts: 5
Location: Asia

PostPosted: Fri Oct 16, 2009 5:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for the replies everyone, you've given me a lot to think about for next year.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Mrguay84



Joined: 03 Dec 2009
Posts: 125

PostPosted: Mon Dec 07, 2009 12:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hey. I have a question. I know it's always better to go in person to try and find jobs. But initially I plan to send potential schools my CV and a photo. So I was wondering what kind of photo is okay to send, as in is it better to send a really formal one (suited up) or is a semi-casual one okay? Thanks to those in the know.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Job Discussion Forums Forum Index -> Italy All times are GMT
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


This page is maintained by the one and only Dave Sperling.
Contact Dave's ESL Cafe
Copyright © 2011 Dave Sperling. All Rights Reserved.

Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2002 phpBB Group

Road2Spain - TEFL and Spanish with one year student visa
EBC