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Vancouver How's the ESL Job Market?
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AQUA MARINA



Joined: 11 Mar 2003
Posts: 104
Location: Canada *In TAIWAN AUGUST 8TH!**

PostPosted: Sat Oct 06, 2007 10:48 am    Post subject: Vancouver How's the ESL Job Market? Reply with quote

Curious to know what the going pay rate is and what qualifications they require to teach basic ESL conversational classes or private one-on-ones.

I am currenlty teaching in Taiwan and thinking of heading over after 2-3 years or sooner. I hear all I need is my basic TESOL certificate, teaching experience. I hear there's a big market in Van.

PLease feedback,advice?
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chan_konabe



Joined: 23 Jun 2006
Posts: 24
Location: British Columbia, Canada

PostPosted: Sat Oct 06, 2007 2:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes, the market for English language teaching is big in Vancouver, but there is also an equally large number of teachers currently in it. Requirements, wages, and hours can vary wildly as a result. Most teachers struggle to piece together enough work, especially outside of the peak summer months, to make ends meet in such a costly city. The better English language teaching positions usually require some sort of certificate recognized by TESL Canada, or its equivalent. As mentioned above, wages can vary greatly, anywhere from $10/hr to $25/hr for an entry-level position. It's also difficult to find full-time work as many positions are only part-time. For a list of currently advertised positions, use Service Canada Job Bank.
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AQUA MARINA



Joined: 11 Mar 2003
Posts: 104
Location: Canada *In TAIWAN AUGUST 8TH!**

PostPosted: Fri Dec 28, 2007 8:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Great thx for the info. I have my TESOL Certification thru Global TESOL. Ever heard of it? I found my last 3 schools by walking thru the door. Is it just as easy in Vancouver to find ESL schools?

I'm only looking for part-time. WHat are schools looking for in a teacher in VAN? After a few people told me about the teaching demo overhere, that really helped me out alot.

Any suggestions where are good places/ agencies to approach other job fields i.e Airlines, Music Industry, Gaming, Movies, Gov't etc...Sorry so many questions... Smile
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spiral78



Joined: 05 Apr 2004
Posts: 9439
Location: On a Short Leash

PostPosted: Fri Dec 28, 2007 8:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I don't think Global is recognized by TESL Canada as it doesn't include supervised teaching practice. The basic recognized cert is 100+ hours on site, with at least 6 hours supervised practice teaching on actual students (as opposed to peer trainees).
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marksuth



Joined: 18 Apr 2006
Posts: 9
Location: Japan

PostPosted: Tue Jan 08, 2008 4:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think you're getting some good advice here. Just to add a little something though, I taught ESL in Japan for a year, then came back home to Vancouver, replied to a bunch of listings on Craigslist, went for a few interviews, got on a sub list, subbed for three weeks at a school, then got hired on there full-time.

I have no certificates, just a year of experience in Japan. I agree with everything else that's been said here, but I think there's an element of luck involved, and also your likability. Students are very quick to complain here about their teachers, and if you get too many complaints, you're done. If you can keep them entertained and happy, you'll stick around.

At the moment, the BC gov't doesn't require ESL teachers to have certificates, it just depends on the school and the courses being offered.

I have to say though, that I work a few more hours a week, make about the same salary but have none of the stress that I had in Japan, so I'm glad I came back to Vancouver.
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madrid_hani



Joined: 21 Jun 2006
Posts: 8

PostPosted: Fri Apr 09, 2010 9:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

It's now a couple years later, has anything changed in the Vancity market? Any updates? How hard has the recession hit the ESL market? How hard is it to get classes?

thanks
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santi84



Joined: 14 Mar 2008
Posts: 854
Location: under da sea

PostPosted: Fri Apr 09, 2010 2:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

madrid_hani wrote:
It's now a couple years later, has anything changed in the Vancity market? Any updates? How hard has the recession hit the ESL market? How hard is it to get classes?

thanks


What is your background?

ELSA has been hiring recently, so if you have the degree/TESL Canada/experience, you could pick up some part-time work.

The McLanguage schools are still hiring, but wages are as low as $9-12/hour (some will pay up to $25/hour but they are hard to find). It's not a good time for private tutoring as university courses are ending and elementary/secondary schools will be finishing soon.

To be honest, the market is still bad, but not much has changed in the past few years.

If you are able to go back to university and get your PDP, there is a huge demand for provincially-certified ESL teachers.
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madrid_hani



Joined: 21 Jun 2006
Posts: 8

PostPosted: Sat Apr 10, 2010 11:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sanit84, I have a degree from the University of Victoria in Writing, a TESOL certificate that meets British Council standards and is accredited as being at NQF level 4 by Ascentis (OCNW), and I have 4 years of experience teaching Spanish professionals in companies. How do I stack up?

I definitely don't fancy going back to uni to get a PDP mainly due to lack of money and an already giant student loan debt...
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santi84



Joined: 14 Mar 2008
Posts: 854
Location: under da sea

PostPosted: Sat Apr 10, 2010 11:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

MOD EDIT
Anyways, check out http://www.elsanet.org/ which (in my opinion) is the best employer for ESL instructors in Vancouver (non-public school or university/college instructors). Pay is usually $28-32/hour and your experience with adult professionals would be beneficial as ELSA students are immigrants seeking basic English for employment/survival. It is a government program so you won't be dealing with some of the crap that goes on in the McLanguage schools. The only issue is that the positions are subject to government (lack of) funding.

I don't know if your TESOL certificate is accredited by TESL Canada, but ELSA requires a minimum of Standard Level 1. http://www.tesl.ca has an equivalency table.

Good luck!
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bananaf



Joined: 18 May 2010
Posts: 6

PostPosted: Wed May 19, 2010 11:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

From the posts above, I can conclude that Vancover's ESL job market is doing okay then?

But what about someone being 'non-native', would the language schools easily accept that? I'm asking this because in Asia, as most of you would know, when you're not 'native/white', it's just gonna be hard to find jobs.

I'm originally from Indonesia, lived in Vancouver for 2 years and went to school there. Right now I'm back in Indo, but dying to go back to school there and hopefully land a PR card! I've got 2 years worth of teaching experience (in Indonesia) and CELTA.

Let's say if I got the chance to go to university in Van, would language schools consider me to be their part-time teacher (and later on, to land a full time position)?

Also, someone said that ESL teacher is just not high on the 'skills needed' list, so it'd be hard to get the PR Maple Card. Is that true?

Thanks a bunch! Smile
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santi84



Joined: 14 Mar 2008
Posts: 854
Location: under da sea

PostPosted: Thu May 20, 2010 1:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

bananaf wrote:
From the posts above, I can conclude that Vancover's ESL job market is doing okay then?


There are jobs, but they are either low pay or difficult to obtain. Very few have enough hours to pay bills.

bananaf wrote:

But what about someone being 'non-native', would the language schools easily accept that? I'm asking this because in Asia, as most of you would know, when you're not 'native/white', it's just gonna be hard to find jobs.


It depends on the qualifications. Non-native is not an issue at the university level ~ UBC, SFU, UFV (the local universities) will employ non-native ESL instructors (but those instructors all have at least an MA TESOL + 5-15 years experience).

Language schools: Okay, I will be blunt Wink The vast majority of language schools in Vancouver are owned/run by either Chinese or Koreans. It is illegal to state that you will only hire a white face - but I have never seen a non-native teacher at a language school (aside from the nationality that owns the business). The hiring practices often reflect the attitudes of the employer and the student nationality market they target. I can't prove any of this, but it is a fairly common sight here.

bananaf wrote:

I'm originally from Indonesia, lived in Vancouver for 2 years and went to school there. Right now I'm back in Indo, but dying to go back to school there and hopefully land a PR card! I've got 2 years worth of teaching experience (in Indonesia) and CELTA.



TESL Canada also requires a bachelor's degree minimum for certification (the two years experience and CELTA are good). Most employers require you to be eligible for TESL Canada certification.

bananaf wrote:

Let's say if I got the chance to go to university in Van, would language schools consider me to be their part-time teacher (and later on, to land a full time position)?


If you can legally work on your student visa (I'm not sure how that works), you may be able to find work. It won't be easy, unfortunately.

bananaf wrote:

Also, someone said that ESL teacher is just not high on the 'skills needed' list, so it'd be hard to get the PR Maple Card. Is that true?


Correct. Most Canadian graduates with degrees and TESL certification go overseas right away. There is not much work.
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bananaf



Joined: 18 May 2010
Posts: 6

PostPosted: Thu May 20, 2010 6:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thank you for your wonderful (and complete) reply, santi84! I appreciate it very much Very Happy

I actually just knew that UBC and SFU have ESL program(s). Is it the classes they usually offer to international students with limited English?

Quote:
[quote="santi84"]Language schools: Okay, I will be blunt Wink The vast majority of language schools in Vancouver are owned/run by either Chinese or Koreans. It is illegal to state that you will only hire a white face - but I have never seen a non-native teacher at a language school (aside from the nationality that owns the business). The hiring practices often reflect the attitudes of the employer and the student nationality market they target. I can't prove any of this, but it is a fairly common sight here.


Hahaha okay then. I'm honestly not very surprised.. Again, it's got something to do with luck/fate/etc. eh? Guess you just need to find the right employer at the right time... Though the chances are tiny.


I've checked, and CELTA is recognized by TESLCanada. Assuming I graduated with a Bachelor's, maybe the chances of getting a teaching job would be bigger? And yes, I'd automatically receive a 3 year post-graduation visa, with or without a job offer, so that's good...

My major will be Social Work, and I'm looking into UBC (or maybe UVic), and I heard Social Services is high on the skills needed list? Is there any possibility after graduation to work as a social worker and teach English part time? (Private classes, maybe?)
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santi84



Joined: 14 Mar 2008
Posts: 854
Location: under da sea

PostPosted: Thu May 20, 2010 2:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

bananaf wrote:

I actually just knew that UBC and SFU have ESL program(s). Is it the classes they usually offer to international students with limited English?


ESL classes at the universities are usually composed of international students and some immigrants. Since immigrants often qualify for free ESL education through ELSA, the university ESL classes are geared towards academic university English.

bananaf wrote:

Hahaha okay then. I'm honestly not very surprised.. Again, it's got something to do with luck/fate/etc. eh? Guess you just need to find the right employer at the right time... Though the chances are tiny.


Yes... sorry

bananaf wrote:

I've checked, and CELTA is recognized by TESLCanada. Assuming I graduated with a Bachelor's, maybe the chances of getting a teaching job would be bigger? And yes, I'd automatically receive a 3 year post-graduation visa, with or without a job offer, so that's good...

My major will be Social Work, and I'm looking into UBC (or maybe UVic), and I heard Social Services is high on the skills needed list? Is there any possibility after graduation to work as a social worker and teach English part time? (Private classes, maybe?)


Your chances of getting a job as a qualified social worker (with a UBC or UVIC degree) are far higher than ESL. Qualified social workers are in very, very high demand out here (this I know for a fact as I need to supplement my ESL career working for the RCMP!). Being from Indonesia could actually be a huge advantage, as the second language/cultural knowledge is also desperately needed.

Since you have a very high level of English, you could also explore the possibility of working with Mosaic, which would be a bit of a blend between ESL and Social Work.
http://www.mosaicbc.com/

Social Work and Mosaic also pay good wages, unlike ESL Laughing
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bananaf



Joined: 18 May 2010
Posts: 6

PostPosted: Fri May 21, 2010 9:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wow, again, thank you very much for the info, santi84! It'd be wonderful if I could combine the two things that I love and make 'em my career!

Are there any other NGOs/institutions such as MOSAIC? Also, am a bit confused here; so MOSAIC offers ELSA? Because I thought ELSA is a name of a certain government-owned language school, no?
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santi84



Joined: 14 Mar 2008
Posts: 854
Location: under da sea

PostPosted: Fri May 21, 2010 1:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

bananaf wrote:
Wow, again, thank you very much for the info, santi84! It'd be wonderful if I could combine the two things that I love and make 'em my career!

Are there any other NGOs/institutions such as MOSAIC? Also, am a bit confused here; so MOSAIC offers ELSA? Because I thought ELSA is a name of a certain government-owned language school, no?


MOSAIC is the main translation service used in the lower mainland/Vancouver for interpretation (court services, law enforcement agencies, social services). For example, if an Indonesian/English translator is required for court, MOSAIC is used. Due to the sensitive nature of the conversations, a very proficient level of both languages is required. In that sense, it is a blend of both social work, English, and the local Indonesian community.

ELSA is completely separate - it is a government sponsored ESL program for immigrants. It is not a language school (which is why many people want to work there!) but a program that usually runs in churches or other small offices. It is free for students and pays teachers well.
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