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My quest for Romanian citizenship
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naturegirl321



Joined: 04 May 2003
Posts: 9041
Location: home sweet home

PostPosted: Thu Feb 17, 2011 3:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Good news: My lawyer sent me confirmation that my mom is a citizen! Yea! So hopefully I'll be getting my passport this year!

So excited.
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Isla Guapa



Joined: 19 Apr 2010
Posts: 1520
Location: Mexico City o sea La Gran Manzana Mexicana

PostPosted: Thu Feb 17, 2011 6:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Congratulations! Once you have your Romanian passport, how will that help you with your professional goals?
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sroetem



Joined: 06 Jun 2008
Posts: 33

PostPosted: Fri Feb 18, 2011 1:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Awesome, NG.

Acum, poti invata romaneste!!
Espanol le ayudara.

I'm a little envious. Congrats.
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naturegirl321



Joined: 04 May 2003
Posts: 9041
Location: home sweet home

PostPosted: Fri Feb 18, 2011 1:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Isla Guapa wrote:
Congratulations! Once you have your Romanian passport, how will that help you with your professional goals?

Kind of personal / professional. IF I get the passport, then my husband and I would seriously consider living there for 3 years so he could get citizenship. Romania would be MUCH easier for him to adapt to both culturally and language wise (He's already able to translate mumbo jumbo gov't docs just due to knowing Spanish). I've heard the job market isn't the best there, so we're also considering Saudi for a bit to save. Hopefully by the time we leave Korea we'll be able to buy another flat in Peru and basically save all the rent we get and live off of whatever we make in Romania.

Basically, Europe would be open to both of us. Even if we don't work there, we could own property, send our kids to school, hopefully get pension, etc.

If I could stay in Korea for five years at this same job, my pension would go up a lot. If we had kids, then we'd have to decide whether to stay in Korea, move to Romania, or go to Saudi.

sroetem wrote:
Awesome, NG.

Acum, poti invata romaneste!!
Espanol le ayudara.

I'm a little envious. Congrats.

Don't be jealous just yet Wink I've still got to get the passport. If it makes you feel any better, I first called the consulate in fall 1999. This hasn't been easy!
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scot47



Joined: 10 Jan 2003
Posts: 15330

PostPosted: Sat Feb 19, 2011 8:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Is there a Romanian Language test before you are awarded citizenship ?
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naturegirl321



Joined: 04 May 2003
Posts: 9041
Location: home sweet home

PostPosted: Sat Feb 19, 2011 11:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

scot47 wrote:
Is there a Romanian Language test before you are awarded citizenship ?


Not if it's by blood. BUt maybe they've changed it. Anyways, I can pretty much read and listen, it's the writing and speaking that's hard.
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naturegirl321



Joined: 04 May 2003
Posts: 9041
Location: home sweet home

PostPosted: Wed Apr 13, 2011 3:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Darn it! My lawyer has told me that I have to do the paperwork for my passport myself, in person. There's also the issue that Romania doesn't accept foreign marriage certs. Mine is from Peru, my mom's is from the US.

Good news is that my lawyer CAN register our marriages in Romania and send us all the documentation. Then I will take that and try to apply here in Seoul. My only worry is that my birth cert doesn't have the Romania ID number on it, so I don't know how I can prove that I'm Romanian.

Worse comes to worse, they say no and we try to do it in Romania when I go this summer. Though I hope this happens fast, I'm kind of up against the clock. Need to get my passport in hand by the end of October.
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misteradventure



Joined: 18 Aug 2003
Posts: 244

PostPosted: Mon May 16, 2011 2:50 am    Post subject: notarial approach Reply with quote

In Latin American countries, much is done with sworn statements at the Notary in which all of the supporting evidence is assembled before the notary and consolidated into one document. Once it is notarized, it becomes a legal document recognized by the courts, so that if an office refuses to recognize it, they risk being in contempt of court.

Suerte.

-
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naturegirl321



Joined: 04 May 2003
Posts: 9041
Location: home sweet home

PostPosted: Mon May 16, 2011 2:53 am    Post subject: Re: notarial approach Reply with quote

misteradventure wrote:
In Latin American countries, much is done with sworn statements at the Notary in which all of the supporting evidence is assembled before the notary and consolidated into one document. Once it is notarized, it becomes a legal document recognized by the courts, so that if an office refuses to recognize it, they risk being in contempt of court.

Suerte.

-


Not anymore in Peru. Now they have apostillisation. I'm going this summer though, to Romania, so am hoping to take care of it.
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naturegirl321



Joined: 04 May 2003
Posts: 9041
Location: home sweet home

PostPosted: Sat Oct 01, 2011 8:14 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sorry, I haven't updated in a while.

I went to Romania for a month this summer and really didn't get any paperwork done at all. The organisation there is simply a nightmare. On a positive note, I did get to see the country and interact with the people as well as see my family, so that was nice.

I've come to the conclusion that while I could never live in Bucharest, there are lots of other nice cities and I think that we could open a business that would do pretty well.

there is still a lot of paperwork to do, which I suppose is good since it gives romania a chance to advance.

The latest is that I need my husband to sign two papers: one giving me permission to change my name and one giving me permission to register our marriage. I don't get it. Seeing as I already changed my name in Peru and the US without his permission. I even became a Peruvian citizen without his permission.

But, the Romanian authorities want it, so there's not much we can do. He has to sign them in English and Romanian. So that's four pieces of paper to legalise at the embassy here in Seoul. Then they have to be sent off to Peru to get the apostillisation. Apostillisations in Peru cost about $10, yet in the US, they're only $8. You'd think they'd be cheaper in Peru. That's Peru for you.

We also have to use a new marriage cert. Peru, finally, joined the Hague Agreement earlier this year. We tried to use our Peruvian marriage cert that had been apostillised in the US, but they didn't understand that. They kept saying that we had been married in the US, despite the fact that the translation plainly said we had been marred in Peru. So now we have a new certificate apostillised in Peru.

We're doubling checking everything before we start the process. Each legalisation should cost about $30 plus another $10 for the apostillisation, meaning it'll be about $160 plus postage to Peru, back to Korea, and then to Romania. So about $200. Fingers crossed this will work!
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sroetem



Joined: 06 Jun 2008
Posts: 33

PostPosted: Sun Oct 02, 2011 2:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Servus! NG. Hope it all works out for you.

Romania is a great country. Difficult to make a living at first,
but it can be an interesting place to live.

I would not want to live in Buc either, but it can be a lively
city at times. Brasov is a really cool 'little' town with
a bit of Bratslavian influence. I'd say it was one of my favorites.

The Transylvania area and Cluj-Napoca area are
beautiful. I just wish Romanian food was more diverse.

Good luck with everything.
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Javelin of Radiance



Joined: 01 Jul 2009
Posts: 1187
Location: The West

PostPosted: Sun Dec 30, 2012 3:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

naturegirl321 wrote:
Basically, Europe would be open to both of us. Even if we don't work there, we could own property, send our kids to school, hopefully get pension, etc.

Even if you don't work there you expect and hope to collect a Romanian pension? Just who is paying for that and how do you justify your entitlement to any pension? There are legitimate concerns with people holding various passports. moving around the world and double and triple dipping pensions and other benefits while not actually contributing anything. Do you plan to collect American social security and a pension from wherever your third passport is too?
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spiral78



Joined: 05 Apr 2004
Posts: 11524
Location: On a Short Leash

PostPosted: Mon Dec 31, 2012 9:08 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Citizenship laws are pretty tight and these days in most countries (I can't speak for Romania specifically) you need to show that you've got a significant and long-term commitment to the country to be granted citizenship. Meaning paying into local systems.

JoR is correct that the Romanian officials are highly unlikely to grant anyone citizenship without a visible and significant commitment to the country. Not enough to have been born to an erstwhile Romanian.
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scot47



Joined: 10 Jan 2003
Posts: 15330

PostPosted: Mon Jan 28, 2013 1:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Romanian pensions - like US Social Security pensions are contributory. You have to pay in before you can qualify.

Our would-be Romanian has not posted for a time. I wonder what has been happening. I think she is teaching in the Middle East (or Korea ?)
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scot47



Joined: 10 Jan 2003
Posts: 15330

PostPosted: Thu Apr 25, 2013 8:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Has the lady given up on her quest for citizenship ?
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