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American International Schools in Italy
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deniserita



Joined: 03 Nov 2009
Posts: 50
Location: Chicago, IL

PostPosted: Sat Feb 12, 2011 5:06 am    Post subject: American International Schools in Italy Reply with quote

I know that teaching in Italy without a EU Passport quite difficult...but I was suggested to check out American International Schools---I am finding that these schools also are requiring a EU Passport.
Does anyone know of an International School that would allow an American to teach???

Thank!
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spiral78



Joined: 05 Apr 2004
Posts: 9436
Location: On a Short Leash

PostPosted: Sat Feb 12, 2011 1:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

International schools normally require certified teachers with at least two years of experience in their home countries. Typically there are more openings for maths and science than other subjects. Openings are pretty rare in general.
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elliot_spencer



Joined: 26 Feb 2007
Posts: 404

PostPosted: Tue Feb 15, 2011 6:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

There is a Canadian International School in Lanciano Abbruzzo.
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deniserita



Joined: 03 Nov 2009
Posts: 50
Location: Chicago, IL

PostPosted: Wed Feb 16, 2011 1:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks.

I have been teaching for 12 years in America, so I am not too worried about having enough experience, just worried about not having the right passport.

Thanks Elliot for the Canadian School. I checked it out and it's for high school. I am not qualifed to teach at that level...just K-8 regular educationa and ESL.

But I will keep searching Smile
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MilanTeacher



Joined: 08 Mar 2011
Posts: 28

PostPosted: Thu Mar 10, 2011 2:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

There are American Schools in Milan, Rome, and Genova. I think in the past they were more able to hire Americans and sponsor a visa. I did some volunteer work at the American School of Milan, and talked with the teachers who told me they were all dual citizens. There was a married couple, and the wife had an Irish Passport, and they didn't hire the husband until they were married and he qualified for a visa through is wife. It wouldn't hurt to send your resume though, because you never know when they might not be able to find a dual EU/American person to fill a position (and unlike international schools, they do prefer Americans). Unfortunately people rarely leave these jobs, and they seem to be pretty inclusive (like hiring the husband of an employee) so you have to have a pretty big stroke of luck!

Pay isn't what it would be in America. It usually starts at 1,500 a month, which in the cities listed above doesn't stretch too much. But it's enough to get by, plus you get summer vacation etc. Much better than teaching at a language school!
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deniserita



Joined: 03 Nov 2009
Posts: 50
Location: Chicago, IL

PostPosted: Fri Mar 11, 2011 3:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for the input... that's exactly what I have been doing....just been sending out my resume and cover letter to different American International Schools and International Schools. But as of now, all the responses have been saying that they do not hire people without a EU passport.
I have also applied with the Department of Defense. So we'll see.

At this point I know that I need to be more open to different locations, but every time I look into a different location, there seems to be so many scary and negative views! Which makes it hard for me to get excited to go abroad
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MilanTeacher



Joined: 08 Mar 2011
Posts: 28

PostPosted: Fri Mar 11, 2011 4:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well there are pros and cons to every city (and country for that matter). Alot would depend on your personal situation- if you are married/single/have kids/etc.

If I were in your position (from what I understand you are a school teacher?) I would use my summer holidays to rent a house in Italy, and keep my job in the US. Italy is SO much better when you are on vacation there.

I am married to an Italian and we are currently in the process of moving to the Chicago area (where I'm from), because of a variety of problems, most notably extremely low salaries and extremely high cost of living, long work hours (12 hour days), smog/pollution, sitting in up to 3 hours of traffic daily, poor schools and medical facilities, expensive childcare, the list goes on and on. We hope to spend a month every year in Italy, but the reality of living there is just too hard, especially from someone coming from the outside.

Once again, if you were able to nab an international school job, you would probably be able to make it work living very modestly, but if it doesn't work out, don't feel like you are missing out, because the reality might be a disappointment (which would be awful, if you are leaving a tenured job etc). If you make a lot of money or don't have to work and are independently wealthy or a student or retired etc, it can be really great. But when you are trying to make ends meet AND deal with a zillion bureaucratic things, it's rough.

I love so many things about Italy, but I honestly can't wait until I can actually enjoy them (i.e. on extended vacations), living there is a different reality. Once again, if you have the opportunity to spend a couple of months a year there- it might truly be the best of both worlds!! Good luck Smile

PS- I just checked a couple of the international school websites and it looks like they are all positing that they don't accept non-EUs now Sad Still, sending resumes never hurts!
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naturegirl321



Joined: 04 May 2003
Posts: 8975
Location: home sweet home

PostPosted: Fri Mar 11, 2011 5:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

MilanTeacher wrote:
I am married to an Italian and we are currently in the process of moving to the Chicago area (where I'm from), because of a variety of problems, most notably extremely low salaries and extremely high cost of living, long work hours (12 hour days), smog/pollution, sitting in up to 3 hours of traffic daily, poor schools and medical facilities, expensive childcare, the list goes on and on. We hope to spend a month every year in Italy, but the reality of living there is just too hard, especially from someone coming from the outside.


Oh, Chicago. I'm from there, well, nearby. SInce you're married to an Italian, you realise that you can get citizenship pretty easily. And you don't even have to be in Italy to do so. If you're outside of Italy, after 3 years, you qualify.
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MilanTeacher



Joined: 08 Mar 2011
Posts: 28

PostPosted: Fri Mar 11, 2011 3:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yup, I will definitely apply for citizenship when I qualify. We lived in Italy for a year after getting married, and now are going to the US, so I guess it will be 2 more years (it would have only been 2 if we stayed in Italy for another year). We aren't really interested in going back to Italy anytime soon (for the reasons mentioned above), but it would definitely keep our options open as far as living in Europe or going back to Italy in the far off future (think, retirement) without the bureaucratic hassle of visas etc.
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deniserita



Joined: 03 Nov 2009
Posts: 50
Location: Chicago, IL

PostPosted: Sat Mar 12, 2011 2:30 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Looks like all three of us are from the Chicago area! Small world Very Happy Actually Nature Girl and I figured out that we went to the same high school!

I am not giving up anything at home to teach abroad for the year, my district is kind enough to give me a year leave of absence, so I don't need to give up my tenure and they will even count my year of teaching abroad as a year of teaching on our contract so I get that raise when I move back home.

This is really just something I have always wanted to try and right now is the perfect time for me to take a year and try it. Single, no kids etc....If I love it then I stay if I don't then at least I will know that it is not for me, and I come back home to my old job, that I really do love.

At times I do think that I have romanticized the whole Italy thing..but heck you only live once. And I am open to other International Schools, so I am sure that I will end up where I belong for next year. I am now just applying to the JFK International School in Switzerland Smile
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naturegirl321



Joined: 04 May 2003
Posts: 8975
Location: home sweet home

PostPosted: Sat Mar 12, 2011 3:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

MilanTeacher wrote:
Yup, I will definitely apply for citizenship when I qualify. We lived in Italy for a year after getting married, and now are going to the US, so I guess it will be 2 more years (it would have only been 2 if we stayed in Italy for another year). We aren't really interested in going back to Italy anytime soon (for the reasons mentioned above), but it would definitely keep our options open as far as living in Europe or going back to Italy in the far off future (think, retirement) without the bureaucratic hassle of visas etc.


If you have kids, the time is cut in half Wink There's no way you could stick it out another year though in Italy?

deniserita wrote:
Looks like all three of us are from the Chicago area! Small world Very Happy Actually Nature Girl and I figured out that we went to the same high school!

And I am open to other International Schools, so I am sure that I will end up where I belong for next year. I am now just applying to the JFK International School in Switzerland Smile

Yep, very small world!

Best of luck, hope you get in.
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MilanTeacher



Joined: 08 Mar 2011
Posts: 28

PostPosted: Sat Mar 12, 2011 3:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

deniserita wrote:
Looks like all three of us are from the Chicago area! Small world Very Happy Actually Nature Girl and I figured out that we went to the same high school!

I am not giving up anything at home to teach abroad for the year, my district is kind enough to give me a year leave of absence, so I don't need to give up my tenure and they will even count my year of teaching abroad as a year of teaching on our contract so I get that raise when I move back home.

This is really just something I have always wanted to try and right now is the perfect time for me to take a year and try it. Single, no kids etc....If I love it then I stay if I don't then at least I will know that it is not for me, and I come back home to my old job, that I really do love.

At times I do think that I have romanticized the whole Italy thing..but heck you only live once. And I am open to other International Schools, so I am sure that I will end up where I belong for next year. I am now just applying to the JFK International School in Switzerland Smile


Good luck! It sounds like you have a really great/understanding school! That sounds like a really good attitude. The people I know who have enjoyed Italy (or abroad in general) the most usually come in with a set period of time (and finances) to try it out rather than looking at it as "leaving behind everything to start a new life." So you're already on top Smile Don't limit where you apply to- you might find a place/country that really surprises you- after all, it is a year, and it will be an experience whether its in Italy/Europe/Asia/South America etc!
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MilanTeacher



Joined: 08 Mar 2011
Posts: 28

PostPosted: Sat Mar 12, 2011 3:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

naturegirl321 wrote:
MilanTeacher wrote:
Yup, I will definitely apply for citizenship when I qualify. We lived in Italy for a year after getting married, and now are going to the US, so I guess it will be 2 more years (it would have only been 2 if we stayed in Italy for another year). We aren't really interested in going back to Italy anytime soon (for the reasons mentioned above), but it would definitely keep our options open as far as living in Europe or going back to Italy in the far off future (think, retirement) without the bureaucratic hassle of visas etc.


If you have kids, the time is cut in half Wink There's no way you could stick it out another year though in Italy?


Haha no kids for us yet, besides we are doing our religious wedding this summer, and I wouldn't want to have to take back the dress Wink

Nope, not worth sticking in Italy for another year to get it. After all, I won't need to use the citizenship in any way in the mean time (I actually know people who have been married to Italians and living in Italy for decades but haven't bothered to get it, there is some advantage to your retirement funds if you don't). I already have a "permanent residence card" for Italy which is valid indefinitely, which has all of the same rights except voting. Maybe I could let the OP borrow it for a year? Smile
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esl4everever



Joined: 20 Nov 2011
Posts: 38
Location: US

PostPosted: Sat Mar 31, 2012 2:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I do not know that much about Italy.


But - I do study different hiring requirements for institutions around the world when i have time for my esl site.


From what i understand American schools do not require you to have any type of dual or EU citizenship.
American schools are backed by the United States Department of State.
The schools are supposed to be ran by US standards to a point although they are located in another country.


I myself have talked to several American schools at different locations.
All of them have told me they want you to be a US citizen and have teaching credentials for the US.


If American schools are turning down US citizens telling them they need EU or dual citizenship I do not know what to say or whats going on.


I'm going to touch base with some American schools in different countries and see what they say.
I will post an update on this thread when I get some responses from schools.
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spiral78



Joined: 05 Apr 2004
Posts: 9436
Location: On a Short Leash

PostPosted: Sat Mar 31, 2012 3:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
From what i understand American schools do not require you to have any type of dual or EU citizenship.
American schools are backed by the United States Department of State.
The schools are supposed to be ran by US standards to a point although they are located in another country.


I myself have talked to several American schools at different locations.
All of them have told me they want you to be a US citizen and have teaching credentials for the US.


If American schools are turning down US citizens telling them they need EU or dual citizenship I do not know what to say or whats going on.


You are absolutely correct about this, and I am suprised to hear that any true international school in Italy or anywhere else is making such demands. The thing is that these schools are not numerous, openings are rare, and most people who post here are not qualified for such jobs in any case. Only a very few people actually land jobs at actual US international schools in any given year in this region.
As others have pointed out, I also know that most openings in such schools in the European region go to people with local contacts already.

I suspect there are schools using 'American' in their names which are not true US-based schools. A private school could get by with this by basing their curriculum on US standards or something similar.

By far most people here are seeking jobs at regular private language schools, or at Italian universities or corporations - where citizenship (or permanent residency status) does indeed matter. That's why the endless discussion on this and other threads about how to get a legal right to work in the country through marraige or ancestry or whatever.
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