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Does anyone have a BEd specialization in ESL?

 
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santi84



Joined: 14 Mar 2008
Posts: 868
Location: under da sea

PostPosted: Tue Dec 20, 2011 12:36 pm    Post subject: Does anyone have a BEd specialization in ESL? Reply with quote

I am strongly considering going back to university for a BEd specialization in ESL. This would require about three years of school for me (I have a BGS - Bachelor of General Studies, thematic option is TESL but that is for adults). I would like to teach in the public school system and there's a lot of bureaucracy around here (I know, I know, surprise, bureaucracy in Quebec) so there's no way around it except to re-do a full degree minus the electives.

I don't have any child teaching experience in the past 10 years (two semesters of peer tutoring for children in 2001) so I'm basically at square one. I have one upper level TESL for children course and I am a mom - I really do prefer to teach kids.

So, thoughts? This is a big jump for me (both financially and socially as it may mean full time daycare for my son).
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cassava



Joined: 24 Feb 2007
Posts: 164

PostPosted: Fri Dec 23, 2011 1:54 am    Post subject: Re: Does anyone have a BEd specialization in ESL? Reply with quote

santi84 wrote:
I am strongly considering going back to university for a BEd specialization in ESL. This would require about three years of school for me (I have a BGS - Bachelor of General Studies, thematic option is TESL but that is for adults). I would like to teach in the public school system and there's a lot of bureaucracy around here (I know, I know, surprise, bureaucracy in Quebec) so there's no way around it except to re-do a full degree minus the electives.

I don't have any child teaching experience in the past 10 years (two semesters of peer tutoring for children in 2001) so I'm basically at square one. I have one upper level TESL for children course and I am a mom - I really do prefer to teach kids.

So, thoughts? This is a big jump for me (both financially and socially as it may mean full time daycare for my son).



Santi 84:

If your long-term career goal is to teach children, your best bet would probably be to get qualified as an elementary school teacher responsible for core subjects. Since you are not a Francophone or fluently bilingual, you would aim for employment in the Anglophone rather than the Francophone sector of the Quebec educational system.

Doing a B.Ed with specialization in ESL would be a wrong move and would jeopardize your chances of achieving your desired goal. There are a couple of reasons for this. First of all, the Feds' recently-stated policy with regard to immigration is one geared to accepting landed immigrants who speak English or French.

Obviously, there will be some immigrants who do not fall into either category, but they will be a distinct minority. Therefore, you can expect to see a decline of non-Anglophone children in the elementary system.

Secondly, elementary teachers are usually hired to teach at a particular level, where they teach a range of subjects. In some large elementary schools, there might be a phys ed. or music specialist; however, if there are any non-English speaking students in the school, they would simply be given remedial work in English by the regular teacher of core English.


Your chances of securing employment will be improved, I think, if you emphasize subjects such as maths, science and social studies in your educational training. ESL specialization will count for little or nothing in elementary school preparation and would probably prevent you from getting on any short list for interviews.

Finally, before you plunge headlong into a new career, you need to do some solid research which might help you to make a final decision. It is important to discover what are the internal patterns of migration within Canada right now. There seems to be a move from large Eastern cities like Toronto and Montreal towards places in the West like Alberta and Saskatchewan. The attraction of work in the oil and potash industries is obviously a crucial factor.

You should also obtain data on the current level of surplus elementary school teachers in the Anglophone sector of the Quebec education system.
Do not rely on anecdotal evidence or gut feeling. You need hard, verifiable data.

It is also important to find out what the birth rate is like in Montreal in general, and in the region where you are hoping to teach, in particular. You don't want to graduate and find yourself facing closed schools and half-empty towns.

Making the kind of major career change that you are contemplating will involve a tremendous investment in time and money. You can't afford to make any major blunders. You need to get everything right. I wish you all the best.
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santi84



Joined: 14 Mar 2008
Posts: 868
Location: under da sea

PostPosted: Sat Dec 24, 2011 12:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wow thanks for the great response! I see your point and it makes perfect sense. I'll be staying here (I'm from BC originally), my husband/children are settled and my husband has an established career. I'm on the south shore (out in "French" Canada, rather than Montreal itself) so I suppose I should head to the school boards and check. I think there's only one English school within a 45 minute distance here.

Really appreciate it thank you!
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Imdramayu



Joined: 09 Feb 2007
Posts: 384
Location: Prince Sultan University

PostPosted: Wed Apr 17, 2013 1:28 pm    Post subject: Public school trends in Canada Reply with quote

I've researched a bit:
http://www.workingincanada.gc.ca/LMI_report_bynoc.do?&noc=4142&reportOption=outlook
http://www.educationcanada.com/international.phtml

It seems that there are a lot of jobs in Manitoba, northern Saskatchewan, and Quebec. I was surprised that Alberta's rating turned up "limited".

After teaching overseas unit Ss for many years; I'm also planning to return to Canada, complete a BEd (1.5 years), and find a public school teaching job. I need to get back to teaching kids...elementary school kids. I'll be pushing 50 but it's never too late.

My question: which province to do a BEd? which province to try to find work?

Im
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santi84



Joined: 14 Mar 2008
Posts: 868
Location: under da sea

PostPosted: Wed Apr 17, 2013 2:41 pm    Post subject: u Reply with quote

Quebec (McGill, Concordia) will require an additional 2-3 years of study. They don't accept the whole "I already have a related degree and years of experience" thing. Quebec IS bureaucracy.
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