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13 Years in Asia

 
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No Moss



Joined: 15 Apr 2003
Posts: 1995
Location: Thailand

PostPosted: Thu Feb 21, 2013 9:42 pm    Post subject: 13 Years in Asia Reply with quote

Well, it's the old No Moss back with some advice and reminiscences (gee, I hope I spelled that right!) for you newbies.

Thirteen years? Seems like yesterday. I'm old now (yes, really old), but still teaching, and dare I say, better than ever. I don't make much money, but it supplements my Social Security and other retirement income, and I live pretty well here in Thailand.

Teaching English has been a salvation for me in some ways. I would have been a lonely nobody in America, even though I had a cute little apartment and a nice little car. While I had a few old friends, mostly people ignored me.

Teaching has allowed me to "be a star" on occasion, and, more importantly, to have an affect on people's lives. Some people genuinely want to learn English, and for them I am a welcome connection.

So what's the key to my "success"? There are really only two keys to teaching English abroad.

First, you have to love to teach. After a year of struggling in a language school in Taiwan, I was still not turned off by teaching. I didn't have a clue about what I was doing, but I liked it. I had a time there where I was very discouraged, but that passed. As the years went by, I found out how to do my job in an effective way. I worked on my craft and got better at it, and now (if I do say so myself) I'm pretty good at what I do. My students stay with me for a long time, and that is the best way to judge your performance.

Second, you have to love to be abroad. This may sound like a no-brainer, but there are two aspects here. First, you put your life on hold when you go abroad. For me that was no problem--I didn't have a life. I wasn't married, I didn't have kids, and I had no real future in my profession. But for many people, the idea that you need to get on with your life eventually lures you back to your own country. Second, and probably less important, living abroad brings with it its share of frustrations, especially in countries like China where the cultures are so different from ours and where the people can be so annoying. I comforted myself in China with a nice income, some wonderful students, and a few girlfriends who were a step above anything I could have aspired to in the ole US.

So that's it in a nutshell. You see, no matter where you go, there you are! It's you, really, more than it is external factors. You don't find happiness so much as you create it. And I can't imagine that I could have done anything that I enjoyed more than what I've done, and what I'm still doing.
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Sadebugo



Joined: 10 May 2003
Posts: 519

PostPosted: Sat Feb 23, 2013 3:29 pm    Post subject: Re: 13 Years in Asia Reply with quote

No Moss wrote:
Well, it's the old No Moss back with some advice and reminiscences (gee, I hope I spelled that right!) for you newbies.

Thirteen years? Seems like yesterday. I'm old now (yes, really old), but still teaching, and dare I say, better than ever. I don't make much money, but it supplements my Social Security and other retirement income, and I live pretty well here in Thailand.

Teaching English has been a salvation for me in some ways. I would have been a lonely nobody in America, even though I had a cute little apartment and a nice little car. While I had a few old friends, mostly people ignored me.

Teaching has allowed me to "be a star" on occasion, and, more importantly, to have an affect on people's lives. Some people genuinely want to learn English, and for them I am a welcome connection.

So what's the key to my "success"? There are really only two keys to teaching English abroad.

First, you have to love to teach. After a year of struggling in a language school in Taiwan, I was still not turned off by teaching. I didn't have a clue about what I was doing, but I liked it. I had a time there where I was very discouraged, but that passed. As the years went by, I found out how to do my job in an effective way. I worked on my craft and got better at it, and now (if I do say so myself) I'm pretty good at what I do. My students stay with me for a long time, and that is the best way to judge your performance.

Second, you have to love to be abroad. This may sound like a no-brainer, but there are two aspects here. First, you put your life on hold when you go abroad. For me that was no problem--I didn't have a life. I wasn't married, I didn't have kids, and I had no real future in my profession. But for many people, the idea that you need to get on with your life eventually lures you back to your own country. Second, and probably less important, living abroad brings with it its share of frustrations, especially in countries like China where the cultures are so different from ours and where the people can be so annoying. I comforted myself in China with a nice income, some wonderful students, and a few girlfriends who were a step above anything I could have aspired to in the ole US.

So that's it in a nutshell. You see, no matter where you go, there you are! It's you, really, more than it is external factors. You don't find happiness so much as you create it. And I can't imagine that I could have done anything that I enjoyed more than what I've done, and what I'm still doing.


Very well said, No Moss. I also spent a number of years in Asia and can very much relate to your feelings. Don't let anyone deter you from living your dream.

Sadebugo
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JN



Joined: 17 Jan 2008
Posts: 174

PostPosted: Sat Feb 23, 2013 6:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I guess the only thing I'd disagree with is that I didn't put my life on hold when I went abroad. Wherever I go is my life and my home. I am looking forward to teaching more and getting more and more experience.
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johntpartee



Joined: 02 Mar 2010
Posts: 3246

PostPosted: Sat Feb 23, 2013 7:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Wherever I go is my life and my home


Yeah, same here. "If you ain't where you're at, you ain't nowhere." Colonel Potter on MASH trying to cheer up the troops on Thanksgiving.
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peco



Joined: 27 Aug 2012
Posts: 11

PostPosted: Mon Mar 11, 2013 7:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Excellent advice , I know that I love living abroad, I just need to find out whether I love teaching or not , even if I'm not ecstatic about teaching I think living abroad will make up for it, thing is, I won't know until I'm out there doing it
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