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Teaching in Gaziantep
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Ohms33



Joined: 27 Jul 2013
Posts: 2
Location: GAZIANTEP

PostPosted: Tue Jul 30, 2013 1:31 pm    Post subject: Teaching in Gaziantep Reply with quote

Hello I have recently relocated to Gaziantep with my partner.
Are there any teachers in Gaziantep who are currently here and who have worked previously worked in Antep?

I would like to know about prospective EFL opportunities. I have had interviews at Zirve Univesity, Hasan Kolyoncu University and made contact with Wall Street Institute, but does anyone have actual experience working here.

I would also like to meet up with fellow EFL teachers here in Gaziantep, perhaps form some sort of Native English Speakers Society.

Thanks
Ohms Smile
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elliot_spencer



Joined: 26 Feb 2007
Posts: 399

PostPosted: Tue Jul 30, 2013 1:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

No experience in Gazenitep but if you contact prime recruitment uk there's a really good job going there (pay wise) in a high school. I'd avoid WSI unless it's a first job .
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copylight



Joined: 19 Mar 2012
Posts: 2
Location: Gaziantep

PostPosted: Thu Sep 12, 2013 6:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hello!

I have been in gaziantep for the last 2 weeks yet still am in search of a city Wikipedia claim to be the 4th oldest inhabited city on earth. By the looks of it, they replaced it all with a eastern-blok style concrete jungle.

Hasn't won me over yet I must say and the cursory reasons for this are as follows:

Ugliest place I have ever lived.

it seems they build most buildings to 90% completion.

the rental situation is exorbitant.

In the last few days I have been aggressively approached by Syrian beggars fleeing, it would seem, the conflict just over the border.

I've pmed you. Let's meet up and share our miseries.
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parnett



Joined: 29 Jun 2012
Posts: 97
Location: China

PostPosted: Thu Sep 12, 2013 7:07 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I lived in G-tep for one year almost 16 years ago. I'm glad to hear it's as ugly as it was then.
You should be thankful there are other foreigners to socialize with. During my tenure, there were five of us- an 85-year-old gay American missionary doctor, a young American couple selling religious items, a totally henpecked husband I worked with and yours truly. Not a lot of fun to be had with that group.
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copylight



Joined: 19 Mar 2012
Posts: 2
Location: Gaziantep

PostPosted: Thu Sep 12, 2013 8:24 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

parnett wrote:
there were five of us- an 85-year-old gay American missionary doctor, a young American couple selling religious items, a totally henpecked husband I worked with and yours truly.


Haha. If Gaziantep was a band, they'd be it.

Met only a handful of expats, most of which share similar oddball traits to what you just described.

Yes, it is so much more than the Sh1t hole you experienced 16 yrs ago. its grown into the expanding, overpriced, dripping sph1ncter of the south east. What have I done leaving Japan for this?
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sixthchild



Joined: 18 Apr 2012
Posts: 271
Location: East of Eden

PostPosted: Thu Sep 12, 2013 11:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Never fear, there are at least another 70+ other cities to choose from! Try ─▒zmir, more of everything except the squalor and high prices.
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wander&teach



Joined: 15 Nov 2009
Posts: 102

PostPosted: Sun Sep 15, 2013 8:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Here is a news report of the U.S. troops on the ground in Antep. They have been there for a while but with the new threats it is relevant news again. Not as ominous as the news reports always make it sound, but it would give me second thoughts as there are dozens of cities in Turkey where you can teach in a nice environment. After all, Antep has never been known for it's breathtaking beauty, cool weather, and ocean views but they do tend to pay higher wages due to the lack of "amenities", such as a/c, reliable power, internet and entertainment options.


http://edition.cnn.com/2013/09/13/world/europe/turkey-us-soldiers/index.html?sr=sharebar_facebook
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cartago



Joined: 19 Oct 2005
Posts: 206
Location: Iraq

PostPosted: Sun Sep 15, 2013 11:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

There aren't many entertainment options but you can certainly find the internet and I think the power is not any less reliable than lots of other cities. It's a boring not very attractive city but it's not like it's horribly backwards.
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wander&teach



Joined: 15 Nov 2009
Posts: 102

PostPosted: Sun Sep 15, 2013 2:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sorry to disagree Cartago, but loss of power for many hours if not days at a time (quite frequently) equals no internet, no lights and no water in Antep. My current Turkish location has it's own electric generation capacity when needed, which is a HUGE plus. A/C in Antep, where 50C day and 45C night temps are normal in the summer is a very rare luxury even if you can afford it. Sanco Park Mall and the Metro light rail are the only few exceptions. Around the area of Antep U. total loss of power was a regular occurrence (at least twice a week). I regularly had to cart water from the store up to my flat to rinse from the shower when the power suddenly quit and I also had to purchase an Avea satellite internet stick, which was VERY reliableas as my hard line internet went missing for days at at time, on a regular basis. Not the worst place in the world, but there are many places in Turkey that have a LOT more to offer with much less downside. Not to mention the recent and huge Syrian refugee influx (a sad & difficult subject) and the very real boarder conflict possibilities. Turkey overall has a lot to offer, Antep ain't it at the moment.
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parnett



Joined: 29 Jun 2012
Posts: 97
Location: China

PostPosted: Mon Sep 16, 2013 8:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The year I was there I counted a total of five days in eleven months when the water, electricity, heat (in the winter) and cable TV all worked. Of course, Digiturk was nonexistent back then. I recall the water being turned off for about 20 consecutive days in October. I have no clue as to how I survived in that ghastly city.
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cartago



Joined: 19 Oct 2005
Posts: 206
Location: Iraq

PostPosted: Mon Sep 16, 2013 2:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I wonder when you two were in Antep? When I was there it was nothing like that. It wasn't that unusual for the electricity to go out but it was not a daily event and it was normally not for more than 20 or 30 minutes, certainly not for days. I lived in a few different locations the time I was there too so it wasn't just the apartment I was in. Maybe you were in a particular apartment with an especially poor connection or something.

Edit - realized I typed days instead of different


Last edited by cartago on Mon Sep 16, 2013 8:01 pm; edited 1 time in total
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wander&teach



Joined: 15 Nov 2009
Posts: 102

PostPosted: Mon Sep 16, 2013 3:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes, It's possible that I may have been in a particularly poor part of town, around the area of Antep U. as I mentioned in my email. Soaping up in the shower only to have the water stop when getting ready for work, I do not miss. The internet was basically non existent when everyone was home with the explanation being that they did not have the capacity to handle the demand.

Antep is still a nice place to spend a bit of time if you can entertain yourself. The food is to die for and the history in and around the area is great but that wears thin quickly. My observation is that is an older city in need of a makeover to bring it up to speed. That may take some time, meanwhile there are lots of great options out there.
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parnett



Joined: 29 Jun 2012
Posts: 97
Location: China

PostPosted: Tue Sep 17, 2013 12:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I was in Gaziantep in 1997-1998. I lived in a brand new apartment building not far from the big park in the center of town. It was a 20 minute walk to the Tugcan Hotel.
The reason for the water being cut off for almost 3 weeks was explained to me as follows:A new dam had been constructed a long distance away in order to supply Gaziantep, Urfa etc. with water. Apparently, several farmers had punctured the pipeline with picks to irrigate their nearby fields. It took nearly 3 weeks to repair the damage.
I always found this explanation a bit farfetched. The real reason was probably an error made by Turkish "engineers" during construction.
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PC Parrot



Joined: 11 Dec 2009
Posts: 351
Location: Moral Police Station

PostPosted: Tue Sep 17, 2013 3:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Don't bank on it being far fetched.

There was once news footage of a village swamped in oil. A pipeline passed under the village, and the villagers wanted their share of the black gold ..

It's typical of the intelligence of the MAGANDA ..
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wander&teach



Joined: 15 Nov 2009
Posts: 102

PostPosted: Tue Sep 17, 2013 4:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Maybe we should start a "Funny Turkish Story" thread. Heres mine.

Just last year I watched them build a new branch of tracks, stations, tunnel, and roads for the light rail system. Days after my area was completed the new pristine blacktop road was attacked by an excavator to 'install the electrical cables. If that wasn't enough the entire pedestrian station was also demolished and moved a few meters down. Seems it didn't quite line up with the tracks!

The locals were not upset at all as the extra work gave the workers more salary. Rolling Eyes
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