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Finding a job with a CELTA and no experience?
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Coolguy123



Joined: 10 Apr 2013
Posts: 89

PostPosted: Mon Sep 23, 2013 11:01 pm    Post subject: Finding a job with a CELTA and no experience? Reply with quote

Hi,

I'm interested in teaching in Russia - and I'd like to know the prospects of teaching without experience but with a TEFL cert (CELTA). I'm thinking that a job outside of main centers like Moscow or St. Petersburg might have the best opportunities.

I'm thinking of working at a McSchool - my main concern is getting a job that will give me the experience that I need and development to get started in the classroom - basically, since I'm just getting started.

I do have a year of experience in Japan, but it was quite some time ago, and I'll need to get used to things again and "remember" so to speak.

How long does it usually take to get a job from abroad? Do most of the schools pay airfare?

Additionally - how long does the visa take to process? I was told it can take a few months. I'm trying to determine a timeline for the application process.

Thanks and appreciate the info!
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spiral78



Joined: 05 Apr 2004
Posts: 9130
Location: On a Short Leash

PostPosted: Tue Sep 24, 2013 5:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
I do have a year of experience in Japan, but it was quite some time ago, and I'll need to get used to things again and "remember" so to speak


Actually, likely little need to remember what worked in Japan. Russian students are a VERY different breed.

http://forums.eslcafe.com/job/viewtopic.php?t=95456&start=0
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Coolguy123



Joined: 10 Apr 2013
Posts: 89

PostPosted: Tue Sep 24, 2013 6:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yeah, that's kind of what I expected. Sounds like the work is a lot more difficult to get used to as well - makes me think that getting started again in a place like korea might be easier, but it does seem that teaching beginner classes can be a good way to learn grammar and such as you're teaching it, and more informative for the teacher.
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teacher X



Joined: 13 Feb 2013
Posts: 135
Location: Super Sovietsky Apartment Box 918

PostPosted: Tue Sep 24, 2013 7:02 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Oh my...I followed the link and saw Sasha list an exact description of me.
SHIT! Can I has an Lexi?

I worked in Japan/China/Germany before coming here, but I can't say that there's a huge difference. You're a monkey and you're paid to dance.
Horrible students are horrible. Kids are monsters. Teenagers don't want to be there. It doesn't matter what country you're in, students are students and you just need to try and adapt your approach to suit them on an individual level.

I was once told by a Japanese administrator, "you're not a teacher, you're a host and a babysitter" and I must say that this still applies even in Russia. My adult students don't really seem to have any interest in learning English, they just come to complain about how shit their lives are.
As in Asia, every parent here believes that their child is a candidate for mensa and can do no wrong. I would say that the expectations for a child's English development generally lower than Asia, but that's also due to the kids starting school at a much later age. I'd say that the kids here are intellectually and behaviorally a few years behind Chinese kids. Clearly this is because Chinese kids are thrown in to an educational system around the age of 3.

If you have experience with kids, you'll go far. Nobody wants to teach kids here in Moscow, but the schools are seeing a noticeable drop in adults and a large increase in kids.
I base this on the 2 schools I work for and my flatmate has told me that he's noticed the same thing in the 4 schools he works for.
So at least on the McSchool front, there's likely going to be an increased call for teachers who will work for kids.

As for schools providing airfare, you'll generally be reimbursed 50% of the costs and it will be a split payment (one after 3 months and one after 6 months in my case) Although now that you mention it, I don't think I was ever paid mine.

I would warn you that the McSchools here tend to just throw you into a class and expect you to land running. There's no induction or gradual introduction to classes, you'll just be given a dozen classes and told to sort your shit out. But hey, sink or swim. Wink
Most teachers will help you out if you're having problems.
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Coolguy123



Joined: 10 Apr 2013
Posts: 89

PostPosted: Tue Sep 24, 2013 7:22 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wow! Crazy - throw you in and figure it out huh? Sounds fun/exciting/a little worrying. Russian kids - I don't have enough imagination to think of what they would be like, but could be interesting. If the opportunity is there and if moscow is exciting enough.

Still - what's the visa process like? I'm having some trouble locating info on it. Does it really take 3 months?
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tuco



Joined: 19 Jul 2013
Posts: 14

PostPosted: Tue Sep 24, 2013 8:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Here are some examples of what Russian kids are like:

http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=cIdJnZIpeZA

http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=lH3wlNJQjMk

http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=Qv0cwgLkE0w

OK, those are just flashbacks of perestroika-induced angst. Very Happy But I do hope I don't end up like Yelena Sergeyevna...
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Sashadroogie



Joined: 17 Apr 2007
Posts: 8608
Location: Moskva, The Workers' Paradise

PostPosted: Tue Sep 24, 2013 10:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

teacher X wrote:


I worked in Japan/China/Germany before coming here, but I can't say that there's a huge difference. You're a monkey and you're paid to dance.


Dearie me... Where exactly are you teaching, Teacher X? This in no way corresponds to my experience here, nor any of m'colleagues. I have taught all the above mentioned nationalities, though admittedly not in their home countries, and can say that there is a massive difference in teaching them. Teaching, that is. Not dancing. No Lexuses for you, you scamp! Maybe a Zhiguli?

Re the OP's concerns, McSchools are basically set up for raw teachers. You will not be the only inexperienced teacher. Not at all. Of the McSchools, BKC generally seems to be a little better in the teacher-training side of things and new teacher support, but they are all quite similar in most other respects. Any of them will afford you your initial opportunity to get started in the classroom.

Best of luck to you.
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teacher X



Joined: 13 Feb 2013
Posts: 135
Location: Super Sovietsky Apartment Box 918

PostPosted: Tue Sep 24, 2013 6:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

There are of course small differences which are reflections of their mother languages, but I never consider them to be massive.
You just deal with the fact that Japanese require more help with pronunciation of Rs and Ls and that Russians have issue with word order.

Here's an example of a kids class I picked up on Saturday.

One 11 year old girl kept jumping on me and tried to climb me several times. At the end of the lesson she shouted "TEACHER, WILL YOU MARRY ME?"
I replied with, "I'm sorry Natasha, but you are too young for me."
She laughed and shouted "THEN I WILL SHIT ON YOUR HEAD."

...and schools wonder why teachers don't want to teach kids.
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Sashadroogie



Joined: 17 Apr 2007
Posts: 8608
Location: Moskva, The Workers' Paradise

PostPosted: Wed Sep 25, 2013 11:24 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ho ho ho! Small differences indeed. You are too funny, comrade teacher X. Next you'll be telling us that Japanese and Russian social norms are virtually identical too! Hee hee!
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teacher X



Joined: 13 Feb 2013
Posts: 135
Location: Super Sovietsky Apartment Box 918

PostPosted: Wed Sep 25, 2013 6:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sashadroogie wrote:
Ho ho ho! Small differences indeed. You are too funny, comrade teacher X. Next you'll be telling us that Japanese and Russian social norms are virtually identical too! Hee hee!


It's practically the same country!

Ahaha, my apologies. I don't consider them to be differences because they never caused me any major problems. But yes, I agree that they are indeed differences, even if I overlook them as such.
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Sashadroogie



Joined: 17 Apr 2007
Posts: 8608
Location: Moskva, The Workers' Paradise

PostPosted: Thu Sep 26, 2013 4:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

They don't have to always cause problems when teaching. But it is important to be aware of them in the classroom. For example, Russian students will not typically sit respectfully through a dull or otherwise ineffective lesson, whereas Japanese tend to do so. Generalization. Massive one. But something for the OP to be aware of. Not to be overlooked, by any means.
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S.Thornton



Joined: 03 Jun 2013
Posts: 3

PostPosted: Sun Oct 06, 2013 1:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I teach at English First. After reading some of these experiences, all I can say is: wtf? The age group I teach is 13-18. I work 5 days a week and they pay 68,500 rubles per month. This includes a flight allowance of 3,500 rubles per month. The only teaching experience I had before coming here was a year of being a writing tutor at university, and a term as a teaching assistant at a high school in the United States. I have a degree in English and I got an online TESOL certification to pad my CV.

I have had a great time teaching here thus far. I teach teens, some that do not want to be there, and others that genuinely want to improve their English. I don't really understand some of the comments about Russian students. I find my older students to be very well behaved, and they ask some difficult questions about grammar. They want to learn. Maybe I am just lucky, but I think teens are teens, pretty much anywhere you go. Yes it varies, depending on culture, however they are still teens. You have to have reasonable expectations going into any teaching position, and, more importantly, you must maintain a positive attitude if you want to survive.

I hope this helps. Feel free to message me with any other questions you might have.
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teacher X



Joined: 13 Feb 2013
Posts: 135
Location: Super Sovietsky Apartment Box 918

PostPosted: Tue Oct 08, 2013 9:14 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

S.Thornton wrote:
I teach at English First. After reading some of these experiences, all I can say is: wtf? The age group I teach is 13-18. I work 5 days a week and they pay 68,500 rubles per month. This includes a flight allowance of 3,500 rubles per month.


You find and pay for your own accommodation?
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Sashadroogie



Joined: 17 Apr 2007
Posts: 8608
Location: Moskva, The Workers' Paradise

PostPosted: Tue Oct 08, 2013 5:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Urrrgghh! Teens five days a week and they only pay you a measly 70-odd k a month. I would certainly hope that accommodation is thrown in. In the Metropole, I should jolly well think.
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Coolguy123



Joined: 10 Apr 2013
Posts: 89

PostPosted: Fri Nov 29, 2013 7:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sashadroogie wrote:
Urrrgghh! Teens five days a week and they only pay you a measly 70-odd k a month. I would certainly hope that accommodation is thrown in. In the Metropole, I should jolly well think.


Honestly that sounds pretty good. I've heard the a good rate is 33,000 roubles/month (to start), with lodging, visa stuff, and at least $900 of airfare. That's for living outside of Moscow (you'd need more in the city).

Where I am currently, most people get paid about $2000 a month (if they have a full schedule), but no housing or airfare, and you have to pay for your own visa. And some people are required to work 6 days a week (either saturday or sunday mornings). You're also required to teach kids for the majority of jobs, mostly elementary (almost no adult hours available).
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