Site Search:
 
TEFL International Supports Dave's ESL Cafe
TEFL Courses, TESOL Course, English Teaching Jobs - TEFL International
Job Discussion Forums Forum Index Job Discussion Forums
"The Internet's Meeting Place for ESL/EFL Students and Teachers from Around the World!"
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

World's 10 hardest working countries
Goto page 1, 2  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Job Discussion Forums Forum Index -> Current Events Forum
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
nomad soul



Joined: 31 Jan 2010
Posts: 3628
Location: Terra firma

PostPosted: Tue Oct 15, 2013 1:02 pm    Post subject: World's 10 hardest working countries Reply with quote

10 hardest working countries
By Annalyn Kurtz, CNNMoney | 2013 July 16
Source: http://money.cnn.com/gallery/news/economy/2013/07/16/10-hardest-working-countries/index.html

(CNN) Where in the world do workers toil the most each year? The United States is high on the list, but a few other countries work even harder.

1. Mexico
Average annual hours: 2,317 / Average annual wages: $9,885
In Mexico, workers average 45 hours a week, the most of any industrialized nation. They work about 519 hours more than the typical American worker each year, only to earn less than a fifth of the pay. When the OECD (oecd.org) ranks industrialized nations by education and work-life balance, Mexico comes out on the bottom in both cases. Only about a third of adults -- ages 25 to 64 -- have earned the equivalent of a high school diploma. There's also a huge gender gap in the job market. Whereas 78% of men have jobs, only about 43% of adult women work for pay.

2. Chile
Average annual hours: 2,102 / Average annual wages: $15,820
In Chile, about 16% of all workers labor more than 50 hours a week. Over a year, Chileans work about 300 hours more than a typical American worker. Social inequality is the worst of any industrialized nation, according to OECD. The top 20% of the population lives on about $31,000 a year after taxes, while the bottom 20% take home less than $2,400 a year.

3. Korea
Average annual hours: 2,092 / Average annual wages: $35,406
Korea's labor force is still deeply tied to traditional gender roles. About 75% of Korean men work in paid jobs, while only 53% of women do so. At home, men spend an average of 45 minutes per day cooking, cleaning or caring -- one of the lowest levels of male domestic work among industrialized nations. This is five times less than the average Korean woman, who spends 227 minutes per day on domestic work.
As Korea's working age population ages, it is faced with a dual challenge: too few babies and too little female employment, the OECD says.

4. Estonia
Average annual hours: 2,021 / Average annual wages: $17,323
In Estonia, wages are low and long-term unemployment is high, compared to other European countries. Those who are employed tend to work a full 40-hour week and flexible work schedules are uncommon. Only 10% of Estonian employees work part-time.

5. Russian Federation
Average annual hours: 2,002 / Average annual wages: $15,286*
The common work week is 40 hours long in Russia, and strict overtime laws mean few workers go beyond 50 hours. Meanwhile, Russian labor laws grant all workers 28 days of paid vacation, in addition to public holidays. That said, the average Russian worker still puts in 200 more work hours each year than an American, mainly because part-time work is rare. Only about 5% of employees work part time.
(*Wage data wasn't available for Russia. Data reflects average household income, after taxes, according to OECD.)

6. Poland
Average annual hours: 1,893 / Average annual wages: $20,069
The average Polish worker averages 40 hours a week, but for about 10% of working men in the country, the work week extends more than 50 hours. Temporary jobs are also quite common, with about one in five Polish workers employed on short-term contracts.

7. United States
Average annual hours: 1,798 / Average annual wages: $54,450
Four out of five American employees work at least 35 hours a week, and the country is the only developed nation not to guarantee workers a right to some vacation time each year. Unlike most European countries, U.S. labor laws also don't guarantee workers access to paid sick leave or maternity leave. Workers in the mining and logging industry tend to work the longest hours, averaging 44 hours a week.

8. Hungary
Average annual hours: 1,797 / Average annual wages: $19,437
In 2002, Hungary considered shortening the official work week to 38 hours, with even the country's prime minister on board. But the proposal never became law, and about 71% of employed Hungarians still work 39 to 41 hours a week. Like in other Central European countries, the share of part-time work is very low. Only about 5% of Hungarian workers average fewer than 30 hours a week.

9. Japan
Average annual hours: 1,765 / Average annual wages: $35,143
Japanese workers have a reputation for working long hours. In 2012, the average Japanese worked ranked ninth among industrialized nations for the most hours worked each year. But Japanese work hours have gradually declined since the 1990s. Whereas workers in Japan averaged 1,910 hours a year back in 1995, they worked 145 fewer hours in 2012.

10. Slovak Republic
Average annual hours: 1,749 / Average annual wages: $19,068
Flexible work schedule? What's that? Similar to Russia, part-time work is practically non-existent in the Slovak Republic. Only 4% of workers in the country work fewer than 30 hours a week.

(End of article)
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Prof.Gringo



Joined: 07 Nov 2006
Posts: 2007
Location: Paradise, Paradise, Paradise!

PostPosted: Sat Nov 02, 2013 6:21 am    Post subject: Re: World's 10 hardest working countries Reply with quote

nomad soul wrote:
10 hardest working countries
By Annalyn Kurtz, CNNMoney | 2013 July 16
Source: http://money.cnn.com/gallery/news/economy/2013/07/16/10-hardest-working-countries/index.html

(CNN) Where in the world do workers toil the most each year? The United States is high on the list, but a few other countries work even harder.

1. Mexico
Average annual hours: 2,317 / Average annual wages: $9,885
In Mexico, workers average 45 hours a week, the most of any industrialized nation. They work about 519 hours more than the typical American worker each year, only to earn less than a fifth of the pay. When the OECD (oecd.org) ranks industrialized nations by education and work-life balance, Mexico comes out on the bottom in both cases. Only about a third of adults -- ages 25 to 64 -- have earned the equivalent of a high school diploma. There's also a huge gender gap in the job market. Whereas 78% of men have jobs, only about 43% of adult women work for pay.

7. United States
Average annual hours: 1,798 / Average annual wages: $54,450
Four out of five American employees work at least 35 hours a week, and the country is the only developed nation not to guarantee workers a right to some vacation time each year. Unlike most European countries, U.S. labor laws also don't guarantee workers access to paid sick leave or maternity leave. Workers in the mining and logging industry tend to work the longest hours, averaging 44 hours a week.
(End of article)


In Mexico, a 6 day a week, 10 hours per day work week is the norm outside of "office" type jobs.

In the USA I often work in maritime transport and 84 hours per week (12 hour days with NO days off) for weeks or even months at a time is the norm.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Sashadroogie



Joined: 17 Apr 2007
Posts: 8928
Location: Moskva, The Workers' Paradise

PostPosted: Sat Nov 02, 2013 7:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

These surveys are all very well, but I'm not convinced of their accuracy. Hours spent 'at work' does not always mean 'hard at work'. Ten hours in an office in Moscow can often really just mean two hours of work, one hour plus of fag breaks, three hours of Facebook, two hours of lunch, and generally just skiving off the rest.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
JustinC



Joined: 15 Mar 2013
Posts: 138
Location: The Land That Time Forgot

PostPosted: Thu Nov 14, 2013 6:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Then there are the cultures where leaving after the boss is the only way to secure a chance of promotion when the opportunity arises. It doesn't actually matter what you're doing just as long as you're at your desk and, subsequently, away from family and friends and any chance of a balance between work and play.

This is a list of the 'hardest workers' but it actually should be called 'Work the longest hours and so probably are the least efficient'. I don't doubt some individuals can put in 12 hour days and stay productive but no nation is only made up of that type.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
spiral78



Joined: 05 Apr 2004
Posts: 9323
Location: On a Short Leash

PostPosted: Thu Nov 14, 2013 2:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes, I watch admin staff at some schools arrive at 8 and get started at 10. Not that the teachers are necessarily any better!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Sashadroogie



Joined: 17 Apr 2007
Posts: 8928
Location: Moskva, The Workers' Paradise

PostPosted: Thu Nov 14, 2013 4:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Teachers have set contact hours, though. And they usually can't slack off during a lesson for a Facebook chat or fag break.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
plumpy nut



Joined: 12 Mar 2011
Posts: 714

PostPosted: Mon Jan 27, 2014 2:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sashadroogie wrote:
Teachers have set contact hours, though. And they usually can't slack off during a lesson for a Facebook chat or fag break.


To any Americans on the board here, that means cigarette break. Laughing
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Sashadroogie



Joined: 17 Apr 2007
Posts: 8928
Location: Moskva, The Workers' Paradise

PostPosted: Mon Jan 27, 2014 4:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Most of them probably already know...

Though, perhaps more surprisingly, I met a fellow who didn't know 'slack off'. Claimed it wasn't used anywhere in the US. I was quite sceptical of this, but perhaps better-informed posters can confirm or deny.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
johnslat



Joined: 21 Jan 2003
Posts: 12304
Location: Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA

PostPosted: Mon Jan 27, 2014 8:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Dear Sasha,

I'm not going to cut that individual any slack - perhaps that person lived in a cave in the backwoods. Of course it's widely used in the States.

I suspect, though, that "fag break" would create a mistaken concept in the minds of many 'Mercans (those outside of the EFL field, anyway).

Regards,
John
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
steki47



Joined: 20 Apr 2008
Posts: 680
Location: BFE Inaka

PostPosted: Wed Jan 29, 2014 10:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sashadroogie wrote:
These surveys are all very well, but I'm not convinced of their accuracy. Hours spent 'at work' does not always mean 'hard at work'. Ten hours in an office in Moscow can often really just mean two hours of work, one hour plus of fag breaks, three hours of Facebook, two hours of lunch, and generally just skiving off the rest.


In Japan as well. Many of my Japanese co-workers are physically in the office for long hours but spend a lot of time reading newspapers or snoozing in the afternoon.

I'm the lazy American who starts projects way ahead of the deadline and thus can leave on time.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Phil_K



Joined: 25 Jan 2007
Posts: 1819
Location: A World of my Own

PostPosted: Wed Jan 29, 2014 10:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Much as Sasha says, I suspect what we are seeing here are the most inefficient countries, rather than the hardest working. I'd imagine that in terms of hours, the UK comes pretty low on that list, but I think it's high on the productivity league.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Sashadroogie



Joined: 17 Apr 2007
Posts: 8928
Location: Moskva, The Workers' Paradise

PostPosted: Thu Jan 30, 2014 4:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

johnslat wrote:
Dear Sasha,

I'm not going to cut that individual any slack - perhaps that person lived in a cave in the backwoods. Of course it's widely used in the States.

I suspect, though, that "fag break" would create a mistaken concept in the minds of many 'Mercans (those outside of the EFL field, anyway).

Regards,
John


Dear Johnslat

As I thought. Thanks for the confirmation of my suspicions.

Anytime someone says "Oh, I don't know that word/phrase because we don't say that in XYZland" my scepticism is on full alert. Depends on the vocab item in question, but nine times out of ten their not knowing is more to do with their not READING in their home country and so having a limited vocabulary themselves, rather than some strange lack amongst their countrymen.

Hic!


Best wishes

Sasha

Now, I have to get back to skiving off work. Money for old rope, this lark is.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Shroob



Joined: 02 Aug 2010
Posts: 1235

PostPosted: Thu Jan 30, 2014 7:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

How China isn't on that list is beyond me. Not that I'm trying to portray them as hardworking, just that they seem to be extremely capable of spending a huge amount of time to accomplish nothing.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
BadBeagleBad



Joined: 23 Aug 2010
Posts: 825

PostPosted: Thu Jan 30, 2014 7:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Phil_K wrote:
Much as Sasha says, I suspect what we are seeing here are the most inefficient countries, rather than the hardest working. I'd imagine that in terms of hours, the UK comes pretty low on that list, but I think it's high on the productivity league.


Any old dig against Mexico is good, no?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
spiral78



Joined: 05 Apr 2004
Posts: 9323
Location: On a Short Leash

PostPosted: Thu Jan 30, 2014 8:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Had to warn a couple of students once not to ask 'kin ah bum a fag' while visiting NYC.


I think there is some truth to the 'inefficient' label (but not applied to Mexicans!) as Slovaks are reputed to be pretty inefficient in the region. Not entirely true, though, as stereotypes tend to/not to be.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Job Discussion Forums Forum Index -> Current Events Forum All times are GMT
Goto page 1, 2  Next
Page 1 of 2

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


This page is maintained by the one and only Dave Sperling.
Contact Dave's ESL Cafe
Copyright © 2011 Dave Sperling. All Rights Reserved.

Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2002 phpBB Group

Road2Spain - TEFL and Spanish with one year student visa
EBC