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My five-year job won't hire me next year, need legal advice.
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marley'sghost



Joined: 04 Oct 2010
Posts: 109

PostPosted: Mon Dec 09, 2013 1:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sorry, none of the following is about the OP's situation, just commentary on commentary. Sorry to hear they are cutting you loose. I hope the union can help. Maybe at least you can get some severance pay or something out of them.
In the public elementary and junior high schools here everyone is transferred eventually. I've been ALTing at my current schools for 6 years now, only about 15-20% of the people who were here when I started remain. The schools here are less autonomous than they are, for example in America. Teachers are interchangeable cogs in a larger system and get moved around for the reasons other posters describe. The idea (ideal?) behind those reasons is for the teachers to have a broad experience and wide relationships in that system at large. It's not like back home in the States where the school district hires teachers and quite often a teacher will spend their entire career at the same school, or at least in the same district.
I have seen in Senior High schools here in Japan, instances where teachers stay for much longer. I knew one English teacher at a very high academic level who had been there 15 plus years. I know another at the same school who was there for at least that long, retired and now is working there post-retirement as part-time.

The "job transfer" seems to be a big part of corporate culture too. For white collar workers in big, nation wide companies, it's almost a certainty that at some point in a salaryman's career that he'll have to pull up stakes and move halfway across the country. I've heard sometimes it's very sudden. Some poor sods get like two weeks notice that they'll be moving from Osaka to Sapporo.

In a positive light, workers are transfered to gain broad experience, form wide relationships and make valuable connections. In a negative light, they are interchangable cogs in an indifferent machine.
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Pitarou



Joined: 16 Nov 2009
Posts: 887
Location: Narita, Japan

PostPosted: Mon Dec 09, 2013 4:14 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

marley'sghost wrote:
The "job transfer" seems to be a big part of corporate culture too.
Another explanation I've hears is that it reduces the impact of the powerful patronage networks that are such a feature of organisational life in Japan.

If teachers weren't moved around, each school would become its own mini-fiefdom with the Principal as the shogun. The Boards of Education would be left impotent.
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eiyosus



Joined: 07 Mar 2006
Posts: 22

PostPosted: Wed Jan 22, 2014 6:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'll just give you guys a quick update and let you know that the situation has gotten rather large, that I have an external union and the school's internal union backing me up, that there are some things in my contract that have been found to be illegal, and that literally every teacher in the English department is supporting me.

I'd like to post more, but I'm paranoid that somebody might see this page (I'm sure nobody will, but you never know). I was lucky to find a great union which I'll say more about after this all plays out.

Until next time.
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Pitarou



Joined: 16 Nov 2009
Posts: 887
Location: Narita, Japan

PostPosted: Wed Jan 22, 2014 6:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for sharing. That's a really welcome development.

I understand the need for discretion, so I won't press you to reveal more just now, but I'd love to know how it works out. I hope they don't ask you to sign a non-disclosure agreement as part of your settlement.

Best wishes,

Pitarou.
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nightsintodreams



Joined: 18 May 2010
Posts: 218

PostPosted: Wed Jan 22, 2014 11:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

^Seconded, I'm really interested to see how this pans out.^
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G Cthulhu



Joined: 07 Feb 2003
Posts: 1303
Location: Way, way off course.

PostPosted: Wed Jan 22, 2014 4:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Pitarou wrote:
I hope they don't ask you to sign a non-disclosure agreement as part of your settlement.


They can't. Once a registered union is involved the resolution has to be recorded with the Labor Standards office, just like the contract should be. (Which of course means they will try to include a non-disclosure clause and probably didn't lodge the original contract either.)
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