Site Search:
 
TEFL International Supports Dave's ESL Cafe
TEFL Courses, TESOL Course, English Teaching Jobs - TEFL International
Job Discussion Forums Forum Index Job Discussion Forums
"The Internet's Meeting Place for ESL/EFL Students and Teachers from Around the World!"
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

Tecnologico de Monterrey
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Job Discussion Forums Forum Index -> Mexico
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
MotherF



Joined: 07 Jun 2010
Posts: 1128
Location: 17°48'N 97°46'W

PostPosted: Wed Feb 26, 2014 6:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

notamiss wrote:
Back to the comida corrida debate a few messages ago, people were throwing around words like “cheaper” and “not cheaper” but no figures were mentioned.

What I see in Mexico City is that a comida corrida popular ranges around 30 to 50 pesos these days. For that, you’ll get a basic home-cooked style meal of a sopa (soup, pasta or rice) and a main dish like a milanesa or a guisado, with tortillas, and maybe an agua (fresh fruit drink). It will be as good or bad as the cook’s home-cooking talents make it.

1. How does that compare with other people’s experience of prices in other parts of Mexico? 2. How does that compare with prices of similar meals in Beijing, and in Changwon, or elsewhere in China or Korea?


Where I live there are some student aimed places that have the comida corrida for as low as 25, It's pretty easy to find something in the 30-40 price range and sometimes you get two sopas and a dessert as well. The ritzy places charge around 75.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
kona



Joined: 17 Sep 2011
Posts: 143
Location: Busan, South Korea

PostPosted: Fri May 30, 2014 8:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

MotherF wrote:
notamiss wrote:
Back to the comida corrida debate a few messages ago, people were throwing around words like “cheaper” and “not cheaper” but no figures were mentioned.

What I see in Mexico City is that a comida corrida popular ranges around 30 to 50 pesos these days. For that, you’ll get a basic home-cooked style meal of a sopa (soup, pasta or rice) and a main dish like a milanesa or a guisado, with tortillas, and maybe an agua (fresh fruit drink). It will be as good or bad as the cook’s home-cooking talents make it.

1. How does that compare with other people’s experience of prices in other parts of Mexico? 2. How does that compare with prices of similar meals in Beijing, and in Changwon, or elsewhere in China or Korea?


Where I live there are some student aimed places that have the comida corrida for as low as 25, It's pretty easy to find something in the 30-40 price range and sometimes you get two sopas and a dessert as well. The ritzy places charge around 75.


I currently live in Busan, South Korea, and lived in Guadalajara, Mexico, for six months back in 2009. I'd say food wise, Mexico beats Korea hands down. If you're in a bind in GDL and need some food, tamales can be had for 9-5 pesos, and are generally really filling (and, for me, taste incredible). Certain comida corrida places I knew of I could get a plate for 30-35 pesos. Tacos at puestos filled me up right and, to get my fill, cost a similar price.

In Korea, you can get enough ddeokbokki (rice cakes in chili sauce) to keep you going for maybe $2 USD on the low end of the scale, but not all that cheap I think.

If you price shop, you can get the Korean equivalent of a comida corrida for about $3 USD, but that's in the industrial parts of town (I lived in Chapalita in GDL, an expensive part of town, when I was in Mexico)

Clothes are also more reasonably priced in Mexico too. The prices here are just ridiculous for clothes.

Rent is a better deal in Mexico, but I've found some good deals in Korea that definitely beat the US by a wide margin. I'd say there are slightly less building issues in Korea than in Mexico too, in terms of maintenance, utilities, water, and electricity.

The pay is the big difference though; if I could earn what I'm making now in Mexico, I'd be there in a heart beat. Sadly, those jobs are diamonds in the rough in Mexico, and a dime a dozen in Korea.

What a bummer to here that ITESM is such a sub-par organization; some of the salaries I've seen them post in the past seemed really solid, and I kind of assumed they would have been a serious and professional organization, but I guess those days are gone.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Isla Guapa



Joined: 19 Apr 2010
Posts: 1520
Location: Mexico City o sea La Gran Manzana Mexicana

PostPosted: Fri May 30, 2014 4:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Prices in Mexico for everything have gone up a lot since 2009. Nowadays, you feel lucky to find tacos for 15 pesos each! And a comida corrida is going to cost at least 50 pesos.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Phil_K



Joined: 25 Jan 2007
Posts: 1825
Location: A World of my Own

PostPosted: Fri May 30, 2014 6:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I remember when I started out with my wife in Mexico, in 2001, we used to do the weekly supermarket shop for around $300, and we always buy wine for the weekend! Now it's regularly over $1000!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
lagringalindissima



Joined: 20 Jun 2014
Posts: 44
Location: Tucson, Arizona

PostPosted: Mon Jun 23, 2014 6:06 pm    Post subject: If TEC isn't paying well.. stay far away Reply with quote

Since the message that started this thread is under a year old, I assume the information is current.

I would like to warn people about several things.

I live by the border in the USA and Mexico is insanely dangerous now. I assume anyone reading this knows that already, but don't think "if I work at a school for the wealthy and live in a safe neighborhood--and stay away from drugs and those involved with the drug trade-- I will be safe". That is not true. The cartels now move into neighborhoods and take control; then anyone who can gets out of if not Mexico at least that area. A place that isn't dangerous this month can be suddenly in 6 months. The cartels also buy guns in the US and then randomly attack anyone--rich, poor, pregnant women..it doesn't matter. They just start shooting indiscriminately. And our country doesn't seem to be willing to make it harder for people to buy guns, so the problem won't improve.

If schools aren't offering good salaries to compensate for you coming to a dangerous location that could also be a red flag they aren't offering good working environments.

I worked at the Culiacan Tec in about 1999 and it was horrendous. I am NOT claiming that my experience has anything to do with what Tec is like now--I now nothing about what has happened since I left.

I will mention that have also heard that all TEC are independently run; thus just because one TEC has problems you don't need to avoid the whole system. I believe that is true. I taught at a language school in Irapuato and the TEC there seemed good; numerous kids living in a small town 45 minutes away came to Irapuato to attend that TEC, the kids were great students and very well behaved--despite me being a language institute teacher who gave them extra work but no grades-- and the kids stressed that they liked all of their classes and teachers and that they were learning a lot in all classes.

My point is this..what I will describe below is was what a TEC job was like in 1999, but it WAS very well paid. If you have this job now and aren't well paid you will be very unhappy!

1) A teacher left because her father was very sick; I was hired after the school year started to replace her. She had an MBA and had business classes--at a college level, not even high school business classes. Tec flat out lied to me and told me I had all standard ESL classes. I have no business background at all! I was observed in these classes and found to be inadequate because I wasn't focusing on the right content.. DUH.

2) I missed the pre-service training, and I "get" that people might not think to tell you things like "if students aren't in class by 5 MINUTES after the start time they are late" (i.e. they aren't late right away); I wasn't upset I didn't know these small things. But one day they told me "grades were due" and I didn't have the school set passwords to log in to post grades. I didn't know there was a major exam date approaching until students complained to the department chair that the exam date was in less than a week and I'd never mentioned what would be on the test. I never met the school principal, and when I said to the department chair "my students said class is supposed to end 5 minutes early so they can get to their next class..is that accurate?" she said no-- but the kids were right. (This wasn't as minor as it sounds..it caused huge problems when I didn't let them leave on time.)

3) Student behavior was out of control. I am going to open that was largely my fault. I was 24--and looked 19-- I had almost no teaching experience and I had not understood what I was getting into. I have mild autism, too.. I didn't know that at the time. But it was not just teenagers being teenagers. They came and went as they pleased and played full court basketball in class. I once multiple students surrounded me while I was passing out exams and pulled on my clothes from all directions. It wasn't just me. One teacher told me after her first semester she wanted to quit due to student behavior-- but the school convinced her to stay, so evidently she was judged to be controlling them well. The department chair "helped me" to deal with student behavior by explaining that cultures are different; she stressed that I was in THEIR culture and I had to "play by their rules".

4) I had a HUGE range of levels..from barely intermediate to kids who'd gone to elite schools in the US for a year and wrote better than many native speaker students I have seen. The lowest students came to me and asked for help; thus I made the class so easy they did well and others complained it was too easy.

5) We had a curriculum/syllabus, but it was unfollowable. They expected kids to write multiple types of essays and a play--and I think more I am forgetting like maybe poetry-- in a semester length class where some students are only intermediate. The kids had access to the curriculum and were told all teachers had to be following school curricula. I'd get assignments I never assigned from stressed out kids saying "I had no idea what to do" and I was often asked "When is the poster due"? I know now I should have been monitoring the curriculum weekly, but it was so much more content than I could ever teach and it was confusing and badly written; thus I just made my own plans.

6) In 1999 if you got bad student evaluations--after a semester--you were fired. (At least they told me that; it might not have really been automatic.) When I was hired I thought that was a plus ("they care about the students above all else"), but of course the reality was students could easily remove teachers they disliked.

There were some good things..and I assume these pluses are still true. They paid me back for my airfare promptly-- I lived on the money they gave me back for airfare for most of the two months I stayed there!!-- and they paid all visa costs. (You can also get a legitimate visa by working there, which is important.) They also gave me free housing for (I think..I forget) 2 weeks and helped me get settled after that.

The students wanted to learn English and would talk to you in English--thus you can get by without knowing Spanish, too. You would likely have some wonderful students; one teacher gushed about what an amazing group of kids she'd had last year.

But if you aren't being paid well the job is probably not worth accepting.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
lagringalindissima



Joined: 20 Jun 2014
Posts: 44
Location: Tucson, Arizona

PostPosted: Mon Jun 23, 2014 6:11 pm    Post subject: If TEC isn't paying well.. stay far away Reply with quote

Since the message that started this thread is under a year old, I assume the information is current.

I would like to warn people about several things.

I live by the border in the USA and Mexico is insanely dangerous now. I assume anyone reading this knows that already, but don't think "if I work at a school for the wealthy and live in a safe neighborhood--and stay away from drugs and those involved with the drug trade-- I will be safe". That is not true. The cartels now move into neighborhoods and take control; then anyone who can gets out of if not Mexico at least that area. A place that isn't dangerous this month can be suddenly in 6 months. The cartels also buy guns in the US and then randomly attack anyone--rich, poor, pregnant women..it doesn't matter. They just start shooting indiscriminately. And our country doesn't seem to be willing to make it harder for people to buy guns, so the problem won't improve.

If schools aren't offering good salaries to compensate for you coming to a dangerous location that could also be a red flag they aren't offering good working environments.

I worked at the Culiacan Tec in about 1999 and it was horrendous. I am NOT claiming that my experience has anything to do with what Tec is like now--I now nothing about what has happened since I left.

I will mention that have also heard that all TEC are independently run; thus just because one TEC has problems you don't need to avoid the whole system. I believe that is true. I taught at a language school in Irapuato and the TEC there seemed good; numerous kids living in a small town 45 minutes away came to Irapuato to attend that TEC, the kids were great students and very well behaved--despite me being a language institute teacher who gave them extra work but no grades-- and the kids stressed that they liked all of their classes and teachers and that they were learning a lot in all classes.

My point is this..what I will describe below is was what a TEC job was like in 1999, but it WAS very well paid. If you have this job now and aren't well paid you will be very unhappy! I was paid about 1200 dollars a month--I don't remember what that was in pesos-- in 1999.

1) A teacher left because her father was very sick; I was hired after the school year started to replace her. She had an MBA and had business classes--at a college level, not even high school business classes. Tec flat out lied to me and told me I had all standard ESL classes. I have no business background at all! I was observed in these classes and found to be inadequate because I wasn't focusing on the right content.. DUH.

2) I missed the pre-service training, and I "get" that people might not think to tell you things like "if students aren't in class by 5 MINUTES after the start time they are late" (i.e. they aren't late right away); I wasn't upset I didn't know these small things. But one day they told me "grades were due" and I didn't have the school set passwords to log in to post grades. I didn't know there was a major exam date approaching until students complained to the department chair that the exam date was in less than a week and I'd never mentioned what would be on the test. I never met the school principal, and when I said to the department chair "my students said class is supposed to end 5 minutes early so they can get to their next class..is that accurate?" she said no-- but the kids were right. (This wasn't as minor as it sounds..it caused huge problems when I didn't let them leave on time.)

3) Student behavior was out of control. I am going to open that was largely my fault. I was 24--and looked 19-- I had almost no teaching experience and I had not understood what I was getting into. I have mild autism, too.. I didn't know that at the time. But it was not just teenagers being teenagers. They came and went as they pleased and played full court basketball in class. I once multiple students surrounded me while I was passing out exams and pulled on my clothes from all directions. It wasn't just me. One teacher told me after her first semester she wanted to quit due to student behavior-- but the school convinced her to stay, so evidently she was judged to be controlling them well. The department chair "helped me" to deal with student behavior by explaining that cultures are different; she stressed that I was in THEIR culture and I had to "play by their rules".

4) I had a HUGE range of levels..from barely intermediate to kids who'd gone to elite schools in the US for a year and wrote better than many native speaker students I have seen. The lowest students came to me and asked for help; thus I made the class so easy they did well and others complained it was too easy.

5) We had a curriculum/syllabus, but it was unfollowable. They expected kids to write multiple types of essays and a play--and I think more I am forgetting like maybe poetry-- in a semester length class where some students are only intermediate. The kids had access to the curriculum and were told all teachers had to be following school curricula. I'd get assignments I never assigned from stressed out kids saying "I had no idea what to do" and I was often asked "When is the poster due"? I know now I should have been monitoring the curriculum weekly, but it was so much more content than I could ever teach and it was confusing and badly written; thus I just made my own plans.

6) In 1999 if you got bad student evaluations--after a semester--you were fired. (At least they told me that; it might not have really been automatic.) When I was hired I thought that was a plus ("they care about the students above all else"), but of course the reality was students could easily remove teachers they disliked.

There were some good things..and I assume these pluses are still true. They paid me back for my airfare promptly-- I lived on the money they gave me back for airfare for most of the two months I stayed there!!-- and they paid all visa costs. (You can also get a legitimate visa by working there, which is important.) They also gave me free housing for (I think..I forget) 2 weeks and helped me get settled after that.

The students wanted to learn English and would talk to you in English--thus you can get by without knowing Spanish, too. You would likely have some wonderful students; one teacher gushed about what an amazing group of kids she'd had last year.

But if you aren't being paid well the job is probably not worth accepting.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
lagringalindissima



Joined: 20 Jun 2014
Posts: 44
Location: Tucson, Arizona

PostPosted: Mon Jun 23, 2014 6:45 pm    Post subject: If TEC isn't paying well.. stay far away Reply with quote

Since the message that started this thread is under a year old, I assume the information is current.

I would like to warn people about several things.

I live by the border in the USA and Mexico is insanely dangerous now. I assume anyone reading this knows that already, but don't think "if I work at a school for the wealthy and live in a safe neighborhood--and stay away from drugs and those involved with the drug trade-- I will be safe". That is not true. The cartels now move into neighborhoods and take control; then anyone who can gets out of if not Mexico at least that area. A place that isn't dangerous this month can be suddenly in 6 months. The cartels also buy guns in the US and then randomly attack anyone--rich, poor, pregnant women..it doesn't matter. They just start shooting indiscriminately. And our country doesn't seem to be willing to make it harder for people to buy guns, so the problem won't improve.

If schools aren't offering good salaries to compensate for you coming to a dangerous location that could also be a red flag they aren't offering good working environments.

I worked at the Culiacan Tec in about 1999 and it was horrendous. I am NOT claiming that my experience has anything to do with what Tec is like now--I now nothing about what has happened since I left.

I will mention that have also heard that all TEC are independently run; thus just because one TEC has problems you don't need to avoid the whole system. I believe that is true. I taught at a language school in Irapuato and the TEC there seemed good; numerous kids living in a small town 45 minutes away came to Irapuato to attend that TEC, the kids were great students and very well behaved--despite me being a language institute teacher who gave them extra work but no grades-- and the kids stressed that they liked all of their classes and teachers and that they were learning a lot in all classes.

My point is this..what I will describe below is was what a TEC job was like in 1999, but it WAS very well paid. If you have this job now and aren't well paid you will be very unhappy! I was paid about 1200 dollars a month--I don't remember what that was in pesos-- in 1999.

1) A teacher left because her father was very sick; I was hired after the school year started to replace her. She had an MBA and had business classes--at a college level. Tec flat out lied to me and told me I had all standard ESL classes. I have no business background at all! I was observed in these classes and found to be inadequate because I wasn't focusing on the right content.. DUH.

2) I missed the pre-service training, and I "get" that people might not think to tell you things like "if students aren't in class by 5 MINUTES after the start time they are late" (i.e. they aren't late right away); I wasn't upset I didn't know these small things. But one day they told me "grades were due" and I didn't have the school set passwords to log in to post grades. I didn't know there was a major exam date approaching until students complained to the department chair that the exam date was in less than a week and I'd never mentioned what would be on the test. When I said to the department chair "my students said class is supposed to end 5 minutes early so they can get to their next class..is that accurate?" she said no-- but the kids were right. (This wasn't as minor as it sounds..it caused problems when I didn't let them leave on time.)

3) Student behavior was out of control. I am going to open that was largely my fault. I was 24--and looked 19-- I had almost no teaching experience and I had not understood what I was getting into. I have mild autism, too.. I didn't know that at the time. But it was not just teenagers being teenagers. They came and went as they pleased and played full court basketball in class. I once multiple students surrounded me while I was passing out exams and pulled on my clothes from all directions. It wasn't just me. One teacher told me after her first semester she wanted to quit due to student behavior-- but the school convinced her to stay, so evidently she was judged to be controlling them well. The department chair "helped me" to deal with student behavior by explaining that cultures are different; she stressed that I was in THEIR culture and I had to "play by their rules".

4) I had a HUGE range of levels..from barely intermediate to kids who'd gone to elite schools in the US for a year and wrote better than many native speaker students I have seen. The lowest students came to me and asked for help; thus I made the class so easy they did well and others complained it was too easy.

5) We had a curriculum/syllabus, but it was unfollowable. They expected kids to write multiple types of essays and a play--and I think more I am forgetting, like maybe poetry-- in a semester length class where some students were only intermediate. The kids had access to the curriculum and were told all teachers had to be following school curricula. I'd get assignments I never assigned from stressed out kids saying "I had no idea what to do" and I was often asked "When is the poster due"? I know now I should have been monitoring the curriculum weekly, but it was so much more content than I could ever teach and it was confusing and badly written; thus I just made my own plans.

6) In 1999 if you got bad student evaluations--after a semester--you were fired. (At least they told me that; of course in reality it might not have really been automatic.) When I was hired I thought that was a plus ("they care about the students above all else"), but of course the reality was students could easily remove teachers they disliked.

There were some good things..and I assume these pluses are still true. They paid me back for my airfare promptly-- I lived on the money they gave me back for airfare for almost two months!!-- and they paid all visa costs. (You can also get a legitimate visa by working there, which is important.) They also gave me free housing when I arrived and helped me get settled after that.

The students wanted to learn English and would talk to you in English--thus you can get by without knowing Spanish, too. You would likely have some wonderful students; one teacher gushed about what an amazing group of kids she'd had last year.

But if you aren't being paid well a job at TEC is probably not worth accepting.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
lagringalindissima



Joined: 20 Jun 2014
Posts: 44
Location: Tucson, Arizona

PostPosted: Mon Jun 23, 2014 6:50 pm    Post subject: Sorry about the triple submit..that's all Reply with quote

I guess as long as I am posting anyway Smile.. Culiacan wasn't a great city to live in. I have lived in Irapuarto and I liked that city a lot. however.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
lagringalindissima



Joined: 20 Jun 2014
Posts: 44
Location: Tucson, Arizona

PostPosted: Fri Jul 18, 2014 7:05 pm    Post subject: I'll add one more thing.. Reply with quote

In my TEC in 1999 grade inflation didn't seem to be a huge problem. I actually made my classes too easy and my grades were too high..they were the highest in the department and they had an average of over 9/10. Dealing with students who failed and wanted to be passed anyway was a problem, but grade inflation was not. What I am reading now is that it is a big issue in the country. If you are dealing with all of the other issues at TEC and grade inflation/being pressured to up grades and pass students who did not earn that right that's another reason not to go.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
lagringalindissima



Joined: 20 Jun 2014
Posts: 44
Location: Tucson, Arizona

PostPosted: Fri Jul 18, 2014 7:07 pm    Post subject: Sorry..I mis posted Reply with quote

I personally had an average of over 9/10; I didn't mean to write "they". One teacher who was married to a Mexican and had been there--happily--for many years had low averages; she was always re-hired and she was very well liked.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
wiotch



Joined: 30 Jun 2014
Posts: 2
Location: Mexico City

PostPosted: Sun Aug 10, 2014 7:56 pm    Post subject: Tec in Santa Fe, DF?? Reply with quote

Does anyone in this forum have experience with the Tec in Santa Fe, DF? I looked through this whole thread, and I couldn't find anything specific to this Tec branch. I ask because I have an interview with them this week, and I would like to know if it's a place I should avoid.

I was also not given any information about salary and benefits, but I assume that this will all be discussed during the interview.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Fitzgerald



Joined: 10 Aug 2010
Posts: 70

PostPosted: Sun Aug 31, 2014 8:52 pm    Post subject: Re: Tec in Santa Fe, DF?? Reply with quote

wiotch wrote:
Does anyone in this forum have experience with the Tec in Santa Fe, DF? I looked through this whole thread, and I couldn't find anything specific to this Tec branch. I ask because I have an interview with them this week, and I would like to know if it's a place I should avoid.

I was also not given any information about salary and benefits, but I assume that this will all be discussed during the interview.


Late responding here. Different branches of Tec CAN be quite diverse in the way they handle things, so it is hard to generalize from one to another even though HQ in Monterrey ultimately pulls the strings. As far as Santa Fe goes, a lot depends on the salary and benefits. This is one of Tec's flagship prepas. If the package wasn't north of 25,000 pesos / month, I wouldn't even consider it. Press to get housing (or a housing reimbursement) included in the offer.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
BadBeagleBad



Joined: 23 Aug 2010
Posts: 835

PostPosted: Mon Sep 01, 2014 3:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Isla Guapa wrote:
Prices in Mexico for everything have gone up a lot since 2009. Nowadays, you feel lucky to find tacos for 15 pesos each! And a comida corrida is going to cost at least 50 pesos.


You need to come visit me! Tacos are 5 and 6 pesos, but some HUGE barbacoa tacos on Sunday that cost 10, but have enough meat for two.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Job Discussion Forums Forum Index -> Mexico All times are GMT
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3
Page 3 of 3

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


This page is maintained by the one and only Dave Sperling.
Contact Dave's ESL Cafe
Copyright © 2011 Dave Sperling. All Rights Reserved.

Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2002 phpBB Group

Road2Spain - TEFL and Spanish with one year student visa
EBC