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Progressing an EFL Career vs. Other Interests
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Solar Strength



Joined: 12 Jul 2005
Posts: 560
Location: Bangkok, Thailand

PostPosted: Sun Jan 26, 2014 5:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

spiral78 wrote:
I don't disagree. I also know some people who've been in EFL relatively longer term with only entry level quals, and who are indeed content with their lot.

I was only taking exception to whoever it was who posted that the job sucks long-term. Not necessarily true.


Spiral,

I read a lot of your posts on Dave's and so would like to know, are you a university prof. in Canada or Europe?
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Solar Strength



Joined: 12 Jul 2005
Posts: 560
Location: Bangkok, Thailand

PostPosted: Sun Jan 26, 2014 5:29 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

OP,

The fact that you titled this thread as "ESL" shows me that there are still problems with basic entry-level training for many EFL teachers around the world.

We don't teach ESL in Thailand, and you should know that.
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spiral78



Joined: 05 Apr 2004
Posts: 9130
Location: On a Short Leash

PostPosted: Sun Jan 26, 2014 8:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have taught in universities in Canada, Western Europe, and Central Europe. I do occasional project work farther East. We have networks of partner universities and I also work with some MA TESL/TEFL candidates, may of whom are in Asia. 'My' students have been primarily European over the years, though I have done occasional projects with classes of students from various Asian and Middle Eastern countries.

I'd never try to give advice regarding purely Asian classrooms in Asia unless on something extremely general! Different world in most respects to mine.

However, I sometimes enjoy trolling about here; your boards are often more travelled and I appreciate the fact that you guys actually discuss classrooms and teaching. That's rare in some parts of the forum.
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PO1



Joined: 24 May 2010
Posts: 127

PostPosted: Sun Jan 26, 2014 9:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Solar Strength wrote:
OP,

The fact that you titled this thread as "ESL" shows me that there are still problems with basic entry-level training for many EFL teachers around the world.

We don't teach ESL in Thailand, and you should know that.


Sorry, I don't really think that when I post. I know the difference. The fact the site is called Dave's ESL just makes me default to that. I'll fix it.

Edit: Well, I don't know how to change it.

Edit Edit: OK, changed it.

Anyway, I hear some people use the words interchangeably so I got in the bad habit of doing it as well.


Last edited by PO1 on Sun Jan 26, 2014 9:25 am; edited 1 time in total
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Shroob



Joined: 02 Aug 2010
Posts: 961

PostPosted: Sun Jan 26, 2014 9:22 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

PO1 wrote:
Solar Strength wrote:
OP,

The fact that you titled this thread as "ESL" shows me that there are still problems with basic entry-level training for many EFL teachers around the world.

We don't teach ESL in Thailand, and you should know that.


Sorry, I don't really think that when I post. I know the difference. The fact the site is called Dave's ESL just makes me default to that. I'll fix it.

Edit: Well, I don't know how to change it.

Anyway, I hear some people use the words interchangeably so I got in the bad habit of doing it as well.


I don't think it's a big distinction to make. Like you say, the words get thrown around interchangeably so often. There are bigger things to worry about. So what if it's a 'Second' or 'Foreign' language, it's still a language you're learning.
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PO1



Joined: 24 May 2010
Posts: 127

PostPosted: Sun Jan 26, 2014 9:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Shroob wrote:
PO1 wrote:
Solar Strength wrote:
OP,

The fact that you titled this thread as "ESL" shows me that there are still problems with basic entry-level training for many EFL teachers around the world.

We don't teach ESL in Thailand, and you should know that.


Sorry, I don't really think that when I post. I know the difference. The fact the site is called Dave's ESL just makes me default to that. I'll fix it.

Edit: Well, I don't know how to change it.

Anyway, I hear some people use the words interchangeably so I got in the bad habit of doing it as well.


I don't think it's a big distinction to make. Like you say, the words get thrown around interchangeably so often. There are bigger things to worry about. So what if it's a 'Second' or 'Foreign' language, it's still a language you're learning.


Yeah, that's kind of how I've always approached it, but I do think getting these things wrong kind of kills my credibility, the little of it I already have. Smile

Back on topic, I guess I would be described as the kind of person that leans more toward outside interests than my career. This doesn't mean I don't take my job seriously, it just means it's not my number one priority in my life. It was the same in my home country. I like a certain amount of "get up and go" whenever I feel like it. I still haven't gotten to that point where I want to completely settle with one thing.

As is said over and over again on these forums and elsewhere, Japan is highly competitive. Any kind of job with tenure is going to get scooped up by people with MAs in Linguistics and other kind of certifications. I'm happy for them. Go for it. That's not me though.
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Solar Strength



Joined: 12 Jul 2005
Posts: 560
Location: Bangkok, Thailand

PostPosted: Sun Jan 26, 2014 1:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

spiral78 wrote:
I have taught in universities in Canada, Western Europe, and Central Europe. I do occasional project work farther East. We have networks of partner universities and I also work with some MA TESL/TEFL candidates, may of whom are in Asia. 'My' students have been primarily European over the years, though I have done occasional projects with classes of students from various Asian and Middle Eastern countries.

I'd never try to give advice regarding purely Asian classrooms in Asia unless on something extremely general! Different world in most respects to mine.

However, I sometimes enjoy trolling about here; your boards are often more travelled and I appreciate the fact that you guys actually discuss classrooms and teaching. That's rare in some parts of the forum.


Spiral,

Are you teaching at a university in Canada or Europe?
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Solar Strength



Joined: 12 Jul 2005
Posts: 560
Location: Bangkok, Thailand

PostPosted: Sun Jan 26, 2014 1:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

PO1 wrote:
Shroob wrote:
PO1 wrote:
Solar Strength wrote:
OP,

The fact that you titled this thread as "ESL" shows me that there are still problems with basic entry-level training for many EFL teachers around the world.

We don't teach ESL in Thailand, and you should know that.


Sorry, I don't really think that when I post. I know the difference. The fact the site is called Dave's ESL just makes me default to that. I'll fix it.

Edit: Well, I don't know how to change it.

Anyway, I hear some people use the words interchangeably so I got in the bad habit of doing it as well.


I don't think it's a big distinction to make. Like you say, the words get thrown around interchangeably so often. There are bigger things to worry about. So what if it's a 'Second' or 'Foreign' language, it's still a language you're learning.


Yeah, that's kind of how I've always approached it, but I do think getting these things wrong kind of kills my credibility, the little of it I already have. Smile

Back on topic, I guess I would be described as the kind of person that leans more toward outside interests than my career. This doesn't mean I don't take my job seriously, it just means it's not my number one priority in my life. It was the same in my home country. I like a certain amount of "get up and go" whenever I feel like it. I still haven't gotten to that point where I want to completely settle with one thing.

As is said over and over again on these forums and elsewhere, Japan is highly competitive. Any kind of job with tenure is going to get scooped up by people with MAs in Linguistics and other kind of certifications. I'm happy for them. Go for it. That's not me though.


There is a difference. Go and have a read.

ESL and EFL are not the same thing.
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RM1983



Joined: 03 Jan 2007
Posts: 44

PostPosted: Sun Jan 26, 2014 1:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ultimately what I do as a job is my own business, my friends likewise. Most of them back home detest talking about their job in their spare time and so we talk about other things.

I've found that in the online world of Gaijin that there is a huge one-upmanship kind of competitiveness and eikawa/ALTs tend to get the brunt of the criticism. Some bring this on themselves by moaning a lot but really if someone enjoys teaching and is satisfied with their life then it seems waste to criticise them. To be fair they probably arent reading these forums.

It's strange because I think a lot of people start the TEFL thing to catch a break from the whole status-driven work culture back home, and then end up somewhere like here lol
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Pitarou



Joined: 16 Nov 2009
Posts: 892
Location: Narita, Japan

PostPosted: Sun Jan 26, 2014 2:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Solar Strength wrote:
There is a difference. Go and have a read.

ESL and EFL are not the same thing.

Are you going anywhere with this?
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PO1



Joined: 24 May 2010
Posts: 127

PostPosted: Sun Jan 26, 2014 4:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I know the difference. ESL means you teach English to people in an English speaking country. EFL means you teach English to people in a non-speaking English country. I just stated that some people use it interchangeably and even noted my mistake. So...yeah.
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PO1



Joined: 24 May 2010
Posts: 127

PostPosted: Sun Jan 26, 2014 4:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

RM1983 wrote:
Ultimately what I do as a job is my own business, my friends likewise. Most of them back home detest talking about their job in their spare time and so we talk about other things.

I've found that in the online world of Gaijin that there is a huge one-upmanship kind of competitiveness and eikawa/ALTs tend to get the brunt of the criticism. Some bring this on themselves by moaning a lot but really if someone enjoys teaching and is satisfied with their life then it seems waste to criticise them. To be fair they probably arent reading these forums.

It's strange because I think a lot of people start the TEFL thing to catch a break from the whole status-driven work culture back home, and then end up somewhere like here lol


I've found this too and one reason I rarely visit these kind of forums because I'm trying to avoid running into those kind of arguments. There are always people who are going to know more about the industry, can speak Japanese better, have better certifications, whatever.

I doubly agree with your second point. I did come here to sort of "escape" being in secondary education for the rest of my life (not that there's anything wrong with that) and I have since found I just enjoy the semi-permanence of the lifestyle more. I've contemplated moving back home, which is something I hear people mention at least once a month around where I am. Smile
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spiral78



Joined: 05 Apr 2004
Posts: 9130
Location: On a Short Leash

PostPosted: Sun Jan 26, 2014 5:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Spiral,

Are you teaching at a university in Canada or Europe?


Yes. Am I going to post exactly where and which university on a public forum? No.
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nightsintodreams



Joined: 18 May 2010
Posts: 223

PostPosted: Mon Jan 27, 2014 1:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Quote:
Spiral,

Are you teaching at a university in Canada or Europe?


Yes. Am I going to post exactly where and which university on a public forum? No.


What lame snappy response to someone who was only asking what country you teach in.

I teach in Japan!

Oh no! The interwebs now know I teach in Japan, I'm doomed for!!!!
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RM1983



Joined: 03 Jan 2007
Posts: 44

PostPosted: Mon Jan 27, 2014 3:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

PO1 wrote:
RM1983 wrote:
Ultimately what I do as a job is my own business, my friends likewise. Most of them back home detest talking about their job in their spare time and so we talk about other things.

I've found that in the online world of Gaijin that there is a huge one-upmanship kind of competitiveness and eikawa/ALTs tend to get the brunt of the criticism. Some bring this on themselves by moaning a lot but really if someone enjoys teaching and is satisfied with their life then it seems waste to criticise them. To be fair they probably arent reading these forums.

It's strange because I think a lot of people start the TEFL thing to catch a break from the whole status-driven work culture back home, and then end up somewhere like here lol


I've found this too and one reason I rarely visit these kind of forums because I'm trying to avoid running into those kind of arguments. There are always people who are going to know more about the industry, can speak Japanese better, have better certifications, whatever.

I doubly agree with your second point. I did come here to sort of "escape" being in secondary education for the rest of my life (not that there's anything wrong with that) and I have since found I just enjoy the semi-permanence of the lifestyle more. I've contemplated moving back home, which is something I hear people mention at least once a month around where I am. Smile



I read an article recently that in the UK new high school teachers can currently expect to be working between 60 and 80 hours a week to keep up with admin. Im not in a hurry to do that.

Nor am I falling over myself to land the coveted sararyman position here, for the simple fact that it wouldnt suit me at all. Id be back to teaching after 6 months.

I tell you the best thing about it for me is that I dont have to account to anyone. I hardly see my boss or colleagues as Im kinda dispatch. I can control my lesson content and if the students are happy then im golden. For now anyway.
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