Site Search:
 
TEFL International Supports Dave's ESL Cafe
TEFL Courses, TESOL Course, English Teaching Jobs - TEFL International
Job Discussion Forums Forum Index Job Discussion Forums
"The Internet's Meeting Place for ESL/EFL Students and Teachers from Around the World!"
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

FLC Reward Volgograd
Goto page 1, 2, 3  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Job Discussion Forums Forum Index -> Russia & C.I.S.
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
Brunouno



Joined: 18 Apr 2013
Posts: 20

PostPosted: Mon Mar 24, 2014 11:33 am    Post subject: FLC Reward Volgograd Reply with quote

I miraculously managed to last 4 months at this company before walking out; this was after serving a full academic year at Language Stink, which must say a lot about Reward. PM me before you dare to apply!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
spiral78



Joined: 05 Apr 2004
Posts: 9510
Location: On a Short Leash

PostPosted: Mon Mar 24, 2014 11:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

You can't use the pm system until you have at least 6 posts; I think this is aimed to weed out trolls/spam.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
teacher X



Joined: 13 Feb 2013
Posts: 192
Location: Super Sovietsky Apartment Box 918

PostPosted: Mon Mar 24, 2014 4:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

How about you tell us about them here. I'm interested to hear about them.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
maruss



Joined: 18 Mar 2003
Posts: 1023
Location: Cyprus

PostPosted: Tue Mar 25, 2014 9:35 am    Post subject: No surprise! Reply with quote

Provincial cities are not Moscow and therefore be prepared for anything....bad management, poor organization, late wages and even downright lies are not uncommon! But then think of how much you gained from the experience, seeing how Russia really is, warts and all!
So come on, tell us all about it on the forum-we are always interested and won't be shocked by anything!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Brunouno



Joined: 18 Apr 2013
Posts: 20

PostPosted: Tue Mar 25, 2014 1:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thank you maruss. You kicked off the problems I experienced quite well. I will try my best to explain the other problems I experienced in bullet point form or else I'll end up with a very long book.


One of the biggest problems with this company is that native English teachers share groups with Russian teachers, and yes, teachers in the plural form. I think I shared my groups with about 7 different Russian teachers. Many who haven't experienced sharing classes would ask what the big deal is. When you are using only 1 book between two teachers and 1 group, you can only imagine the amount of rigmarole which is involved in sending e-mails informing teachers what you did and didn't do and explaining what homework was; plus you have to recieve all this information in return day-after-day times 7 teachers.


Trust me, it's not fun! Add to this the complaints you receive from Russian colleagues for not doing this and that. The Russian teachers rule the roost there in a big way, and you are seen as an overpaid and underqualified teacher wannabe. As maruss puts it, I was given a downright lie when I was told that only 'some' of my classes would be shared during the interview process.


Hmmmm, so much for bullet point form; OK, now I will try harder!


Russian teachers will observe your initial classes with new students—this happened to me on 4 different occasions with 3 different teachers. I don't have a problem with being observed, but it's totally stupid to be observed with a new group for obvious reasons. The 'observers' are also inexperienced and make comments during the class and question the teacher in front of the students. Observations also take place by management with no prior notice which creates a nasty atmosphere.


Teachers are only given student books to work with—management can't comprehend why a teacher needs a workbook and teacher's book, and it took a number of requests and bitching before I finally receieved them.


Anna, the boss, is probably the rudest and most narcissistic person I've had so far as a boss which says a lot, because I've had some crappy jobs in my life. She belittles employees at every opportunity.


There is very little room for teachers to use there own ideas or materials—teachers must follow the company's 'unique' planning guides which contain a plethora of Russian-made handouts and a plethora of mistakes. If one dares to use his own material, he/she must report it to their assigned Russian teacher which will undoubtedly result in an ass-kicking.


Everything is micromanaged as much as possible, especially the materials and what is to be given each and every lesson which drives an experienced teacher crazy. Even paper is micromanaged (no joke). Teachers must request paper, and the amount of pages they want, for printing from one of the managers each and every time they want to print something.


The company tried to give me extra hours—I was contracted to work 30 hours a week, and on several ocassions the company tried to roster me with extra hours. Once again, I had to bitch and complain before it ceased. All of the teachers at this company were newbies other than myself. They are working a minimum of 35 academic hours a week and are clearly being taken advantage of with their naivety.


There are other problems also, but I feel as though a book is starting to develop, so this is enough I think. I'm not seeking vengeance. I have written this to prevent others from being sucked in and wasting a lot of time and money. My experience was 100% my fault and I have learnt a lot from it.


I think I should also take this opportunity to warn teachers of jobs where you share groups with a Russian teacher. This seems common with schools outside of Moscow and in Moscow regional areas. I recently applied for a job with ils-school which is located in a regional area. They have 17 Russian teachers and 3 native English speakers. I turned the job down as soon as they answered my question about sharing groups. It's only done so the company doesn't need as many native teachers and thus save money. It's not a fun scenario at all for the teacher, and I highly advise against it!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Sashadroogie



Joined: 17 Apr 2007
Posts: 9584
Location: Moskva, The Workers' Paradise

PostPosted: Tue Mar 25, 2014 2:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sorry to hear all this, but thanks for sharing. Always good to know what else is out there, even if only for avoidance purposes.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
teacher X



Joined: 13 Feb 2013
Posts: 192
Location: Super Sovietsky Apartment Box 918

PostPosted: Tue Mar 25, 2014 7:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

A school I work at has 4 ac/h lessons. Half with a native and half with a Russian teacher.
I only teach kids at this school, so it doesn't make much difference to me (although 4ac/h for the kids is madness)

My colleague, however, teaches adults. The other day he was teaching the second half of the lesson, after the Russian teacher, and was teaching the students present continuous. The students then started correcting his pronunciation of 'ing'.
The Russian teacher had told them that we drop the 'g' and pronounce words such as 'swimming' as 'swimmin'.

My colleague didn't want to directly contradict the Russian teacher, but there wasn't really any way around it, so just told them that it's pronounced SWIMMING and not SWIMMIN'. Hilariously, the students refused to believe him and decided that they would rather take the word of the Russian teacher than the word of a native speaker.
In the end he went from being bemused to being disgruntled and told them to do whatever they wanted as he didn't care anymore.

Also the same Russian teacher was teaching the students that they must say "going to go" rather than just "going to".
So the students were all saying "I'm going to go to the cinema."
Again, my colleague told them that they didn't need the second 'go' and could just say, "I'm going to the cinema."

Yet again, the students refused to accept anything he said as truth.

Students can be flubbing stupid.

The joys of sharing a class with Russians who have their own brand of grammar and pronunciation.

I would hate to be in OP's situation where he had 7 of them to deal with.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
coledavis



Joined: 21 Jun 2003
Posts: 1837

PostPosted: Sun Mar 30, 2014 7:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm not sure that being provincial in itself means trouble. I never had problems with punctual pay in provincial towns and cities in Russia (and I've never worked in Moscow or St Pete's). The schools vary a bit when it comes to observations: I can remember it was the practice when I did conversationals in Minsk (although I eventually saw their point when I came across some of the cowboy native speakers who were 'operating' there). Teacher-sharing: I did this in one place; we did a quick verbal or written hand-over (usually written in a record book) and it was never a problem. Yes, if you become popular, you will get asked to do more (bosses do not like to turn down more income, peculiarly enough) and it is up to you to say something like, "No, I'm sorry, but I'm doing five nights a week for you; I really don't want to do more".

I am not saying that these places were unalloyed bliss, but I do not think that provincial has to mean dishonest, exceptionally exploitative, etc.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Sashadroogie



Joined: 17 Apr 2007
Posts: 9584
Location: Moskva, The Workers' Paradise

PostPosted: Mon Mar 31, 2014 4:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yip. Cannot see much distinction between either of the capitals and the provinces in terms of organisational matters. Luck of the draw in any place.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
maruss



Joined: 18 Mar 2003
Posts: 1023
Location: Cyprus

PostPosted: Mon Mar 31, 2014 8:31 am    Post subject: getting your priorities right? Reply with quote

I would second those comments and add that broadly speaking. you go to a provincial town for the immersion experience of living and working in Russia, with all that can imply, and not for the money? If the latter is important then you choose Moscow and maybe you will be lucky -or maybe not! Moscow is not like the rest of Russia and many people have to find out the hard way.
As a general observation based on my own experience(and that of others) I would also add that the only way to go to Russia and be able to make any money at the end of your stay is to have the time and opportunity to do private lessons, not have to pay through the nose for accommodation-very difficult unless the firm includes it-and also be quite frugal in your spending habits, especially regarding restaurants and night-life and that includes having a Russian g/f!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
coledavis



Joined: 21 Jun 2003
Posts: 1837

PostPosted: Mon Mar 31, 2014 9:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well a lot of schools, and yes, I'm speaking from experience in the dreaded provinces, pay for the teacher's accommodation. So, although the pay may not be all that good, you do get to save if you can keep out of such fleshpots as are available.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
maruss



Joined: 18 Mar 2003
Posts: 1023
Location: Cyprus

PostPosted: Mon Mar 31, 2014 9:27 am    Post subject: Saving money? Reply with quote

I suppose the problem is what can be defined as 'saving money' when earnings and costs vary so much from one country to another? Leaving Russia with a couple of thousand $ after a year or so in Russia will not get you far in England or other western countries!
But then aren't we supposed to be there for the experience anyway? The fact is that many Russians still earn very little compared to salaries in western countries......perhaps making the comparison is also a mistake and not objective?
So they also have 'flesh-pots' out there in the provinces Cole? Hopefully a lot cheaper than places in Moscow!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
coledavis



Joined: 21 Jun 2003
Posts: 1837

PostPosted: Mon Mar 31, 2014 10:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The beer is understandably quite expensive, especially if they've taken British bitter (beer) over there. It doesn't keep long.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
maruss



Joined: 18 Mar 2003
Posts: 1023
Location: Cyprus

PostPosted: Wed Apr 02, 2014 1:46 pm    Post subject: !!!! Reply with quote

That's a serious drawback, Cole!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
mzuri



Joined: 30 May 2011
Posts: 75

PostPosted: Wed Apr 02, 2014 4:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

teacher X wrote:
... The students then started correcting his pronunciation of 'ing'.
The Russian teacher had told them that we drop the 'g' and pronounce words such as 'swimming' as 'swimmin'.

.... Also the same Russian teacher was teaching the students that they must say "going to go" rather than just "going to".
So the students were all saying "I'm going to go to the cinema."
Again, my colleague told them that they didn't need the second 'go' and could just say, "I'm going to the cinema."


I can actually see some efficiency in teaching these two preferences. Taking the "going to" example first - does using "going to go" work, even if not always necessary? Sure! It's perfectly serviceable. In primary or secondary school, why burden students with decision-making that isn't essential?

As for the 'in versus 'ing pronunciation. Lots of native English speakers in the world default to the 'in pronunciation. Instead of arguing that one is correct and the other incorrect, the conversation could have been about the acceptability of different accents.

Having taught in a public school environment that shared some characteristics with that described in Russia, I saved my classroom interventions for keeping co-teachers from pulling students out of their chairs by the ears or calling students stupid. (Not all teachers were guilty of this.)
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Job Discussion Forums Forum Index -> Russia & C.I.S. All times are GMT
Goto page 1, 2, 3  Next
Page 1 of 3

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


This page is maintained by the one and only Dave Sperling.
Contact Dave's ESL Cafe
Copyright © 2011 Dave Sperling. All Rights Reserved.

Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2002 phpBB Group

Road2Spain - TEFL and Spanish with one year student visa
EBC