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DELTA module 2

 
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RonnieColeman



Joined: 29 Mar 2007
Posts: 60

PostPosted: Mon Mar 16, 2015 2:01 pm    Post subject: DELTA module 2 Reply with quote

I'm looking at teaching in the UK long-term and have seen that a DELTA is required for most of the senior positions on offer.

I have a Master's in Education (ELT pathway), a Trinity TESOL certificate and quite a few years experience. My MA didn't have much observation so was wondering if the DELTA module 2 would be enough for me if I wanted to be considered for Director of Studies or Teacher Trainer positions? Or would I need to complete all three modules?

I keen to hear from anyone who has done an MA and then a DELTA afterwards.

Thanks
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LH123



Joined: 13 Jun 2010
Posts: 61

PostPosted: Tue Mar 24, 2015 10:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi RC

The British Council specify that someone involved in management or training must be 'TEFLQ' - which is to say, they must meet a certain pre-requisite of qualifications before they are allowed to do the aforementioned. This is normally CELTA+DELTA / Cert + Dip, although a Masters degree counts as an equivalent of a DELTA/Dip.

In short, in terms of meeting the British Council criteria you are already qualified, so most potential employers will see your M.Ed as worth a DELTA anyway. While a DELTA won't hurt, it won't open a large number of new doors for you.
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adaruby



Joined: 21 Apr 2014
Posts: 171
Location: has served on a hiring committee

PostPosted: Mon Mar 30, 2015 5:07 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

LH123 wrote:
Hi RC

The British Council specify that someone involved in management or training must be 'TEFLQ' - which is to say, they must meet a certain pre-requisite of qualifications before they are allowed to do the aforementioned. This is normally CELTA+DELTA / Cert + Dip, although a Masters degree counts as an equivalent of a DELTA/Dip.

In short, in terms of meeting the British Council criteria you are already qualified, so most potential employers will see your M.Ed as worth a DELTA anyway. While a DELTA won't hurt, it won't open a large number of new doors for you.


If the MA didn't include a practical component (as the OP's seemingly didn't), I'd be very surprised if the BC recognised it. CELTA and DELTA are what's wanted at the BC and even PGCE holders find it a struggle to match a DELTA holder on the ten point salary scale.

RonnieColeman wrote:
I'm looking at teaching in the UK long-term and have seen that a DELTA is required for most of the senior positions on offer.

I have a Master's in Education (ELT pathway), a Trinity TESOL certificate and quite a few years experience. My MA didn't have much observation so was wondering if the DELTA module 2 would be enough for me if I wanted to be considered for Director of Studies or Teacher Trainer positions? Or would I need to complete all three modules?

I keen to hear from anyone who has done an MA and then a DELTA afterwards.

Thanks


FWIW, I hold a DELTA but not an MA and with Module 2 I think you'd be set to go with just about any employer. However, I also think that doing Module 3 - course design - might be beneficial if you are able to.
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LH123



Joined: 13 Jun 2010
Posts: 61

PostPosted: Mon Mar 30, 2015 9:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

There are two issues arising here. The first is whether or not a Cert and a Masters together count as 'TEFLQ' qualified - which is what the BC require as necessary for someone in a management position (when they are accrediting another institution - I'm not talking here about them hiring for themselves)

I refer to page 46 of the accreditation handbook:

Quote:
TEFLQ diploma in ELT/TESOL

Diploma-level qualifications are higher-level qualifications, usually
taken by teachers with relevant experience who wish to follow a
career in ELT/TESOL. To be considered by the Scheme as a valid
diploma in ELT/TESOL, a qualification must:
■ be externally validated by a reputable examination body
(usually a university or recognised examination board)
and/or accredited by a national accrediting body such
as Ofqual in England
■ require candidates to have prior EL/ESOL teaching experience
■ contain at least five hours’ supervised teaching practice
(i.e. teaching practice where a qualified and standardised
assessor observes the trainee teacher teaching real students
and gives feedback on his or her performance)

■ contain at least 100 hours of ELT/TESOL input.
Examples of ELT/TESOL diploma-level qualifications:
■ diplomas in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages
accredited by Ofqual or similar national regulators, at Level 6/7
of the Qualifications and Credit Framework*
■ PGCE: Post Graduate Certificate in Education with ELT/TESOL
(Level 6/7).
Other qualifications that providers may consider to be diploma
level (provided that they meet the validation, entry requirements,
teaching practice and input criteria listed above) are:
■ university ‘diploma in ELT/TESOL’ courses
■ overseas qualifications (equivalent to a PGCE, BEd or MA in
ELT/TESOL) which qualify teachers to teach ESOL in state
educational institutions in their country of origin.
Certain combinations of qualifications are accepted as equivalent
to TEFLQ. Examples of these are:
■ PGCE in English and a TEFLI certificate in ELT/TESOL that
meets the validation, teaching practice and input criteria
listed above.
■ PGCE in Foreign Languages and a TEFLI certificate in ELT/
TESOL that meets the validation, teaching practice and input
criteria listed above.
■ PGCE PCET: Professional/Post Graduate Certificate in
Education, Post Compulsory Education and Training (ESOL
specialism), and either Additional Diploma (ESOL) in the
Lifelong Learning Sector or Diploma (ESOL) in the Lifelong
Learning Sector or a TEFLI certificate in ELT/TESOL that meets
the validation, teaching practice and input criteria listed above.
■ Post-graduate MA in ELT/TESOL or related subjects and a TEFLI
certificate in ELT/TESOL that meets the validation, teaching
practice and input criteria listed above.
Post-graduate Master’s degrees in ELT/TESOL
(or related subjects).

MAs in ELT/TESOL or related subjects can be considered diploma level
equivalent provided that they meet the validation, teaching
practice and input criteria listed above. Where the teaching
practice (only) criterion is not met and the teacher is not TEFLI,
a teacher with this qualification may be considered diploma
level qualified for the purposes of the Scheme where there is
documented evidence that he or she has undertaken at least
five hours of systematic observation of lessons by a fully TEFL qualified
academic manager or teacher trainer post-qualifying.

Please note: the above does not apply to certificate or
diploma-level qualifications without a supervised teaching
practice component.


It's slightly awkwardly worded, but the crux of it is as follows:

- To be 'TEFLQ', you'd normally need to have a CELTA/Cert + DELTA/Dip. (Just the Part Two does not qualify - but that does not mean to say that it on its own is worthless, just that it would not get you to 'TEFLQ' on its own).

- An MA/MEd might count, but if you don't at least have a CELTA/Cert as well, then you'd need to have on-the-job training (5 hours' systematic observation)

- Therefore, a CELTA/Cert+MA/MEd is 'TEFLQ' as well.

Trust me, I was in charge of getting a university EAP department through its first ever British Council accreditation not so long ago - and this is something we agonised over quite a bit (and liaised with the inspectors about too). Management qualifications can be a bit of a minefield, as it is something that the BC take very seriously.

The second point is about the relative merits of the DELTA [part two] versus MA/MEd programmes in terms of 'how they sell' candidates for teaching and managerial positions. This is less simple to give a concrete answer to:

Speaking from personal experience (I have a DELTA and M.Ed Applied Linguistics), my DELTA was a lot more specifically aimed at ELT - it was all about things like TBL, Krashen, the Lexical Approach and debates about Thornbury/Dogme. And, of course, it had observed teaching practice galore. My M.Ed was far more theoretical, and covered the socio-political aspects of language teaching and learning, along with fuzzier notions of identity and culture. There wasn't any teaching practice at all - that's not (normally) what M.Eds are about. In terms of the 'nuts and bolts' of language teaching the DELTA was far more focused (and, dare I say, relevant) - but the M.Ed zoomed out to wider issues surrounding pedagogy, which is also no bad thing.

As a manager (and recruiter), naturally I suppose I would value a candidate who had both the DELTA/Dip + MA/M.Ed rather than either one on its own. But a Cert+DELTA is not clearly better than a Cert+Masters (nor vice-versa).

A Cert+Masters is enough for the BC accreditation, so it is enough for recruiters to at least take notice.

In terms of pay scales, that all depends on the recruiter... Where I work now, M.Eds aren't even explicitly acknowledged on the payscale (the step-up after CELTA+DELTA is someone with QTS), so if someone with an M.Ed came along we'd have to negotiate it as a special case. If it were me deciding the payscale though (and I do not), I don't think I'd discriminate between a masters and a DELTA - they are different, but equally valuable in their own way.
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RonnieColeman



Joined: 29 Mar 2007
Posts: 60

PostPosted: Tue Mar 31, 2015 3:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

My MA only had about 1 hours worth of observed teaching. I was offered a job as a teacher trainer awhile back but then had the offer rescinded as my MA didn't have the required observations. I thought the Trinity cert would be enough for that but it wasn't.

It was ok for a pre sessional job at a Uni, but I'm looking for something a bit more long term.

I may aim for module 3 at some point in the future, but concentrating on module 2 for now.

adaruby wrote:
LH123 wrote:
Hi RC

The British Council specify that someone involved in management or training must be 'TEFLQ' - which is to say, they must meet a certain pre-requisite of qualifications before they are allowed to do the aforementioned. This is normally CELTA+DELTA / Cert + Dip, although a Masters degree counts as an equivalent of a DELTA/Dip.

In short, in terms of meeting the British Council criteria you are already qualified, so most potential employers will see your M.Ed as worth a DELTA anyway. While a DELTA won't hurt, it won't open a large number of new doors for you.


If the MA didn't include a practical component (as the OP's seemingly didn't), I'd be very surprised if the BC recognised it. CELTA and DELTA are what's wanted at the BC and even PGCE holders find it a struggle to match a DELTA holder on the ten point salary scale.

RonnieColeman wrote:
I'm looking at teaching in the UK long-term and have seen that a DELTA is required for most of the senior positions on offer.

I have a Master's in Education (ELT pathway), a Trinity TESOL certificate and quite a few years experience. My MA didn't have much observation so was wondering if the DELTA module 2 would be enough for me if I wanted to be considered for Director of Studies or Teacher Trainer positions? Or would I need to complete all three modules?

I keen to hear from anyone who has done an MA and then a DELTA afterwards.

Thanks


FWIW, I hold a DELTA but not an MA and with Module 2 I think you'd be set to go with just about any employer. However, I also think that doing Module 3 - course design - might be beneficial if you are able to.
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twowheel



Joined: 03 Jul 2015
Posts: 696

PostPosted: Sat Jul 11, 2015 10:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Slightly unrelated to the above, I am wondering about the full-time intensive Delta courses at IH Newcastle and IH London--just fishing for people's insights and experiences of doing the Delta at these providers. Many thanks!

twowheel
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