Site Search:
 
Get TEFL Certified & Start Your Adventure Today!
Teach English Abroad and Get Paid to see the World!
Job Discussion Forums Forum Index Job Discussion Forums
"The Internet's Meeting Place for ESL/EFL Students and Teachers from Around the World!"
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

Teaching English Online (from Mexico)
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Job Discussion Forums Forum Index -> Mexico
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
BadBeagleBad



Joined: 23 Aug 2010
Posts: 1186
Location: 24.18105,-103.25185

PostPosted: Sun Jan 25, 2015 12:06 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

MotherF wrote:
Rose Cohen wrote:
mtiz wrote:
If I were making 40,000 pesos a month in Mexico I would seriously die of happiness...


As would most Mexicans!



I don't know about that. I know plenty of Mexicans on each side of that line and frankly thefurther below it that they are the happier they seem.

As my family income rose and surpassed that mark we became less happy as there are now pressures present we were never exposed to before in addition to becoming targets of those who think that means we now have enough to give them the right to take from us.


I have to agree with Mother F. I enjoy earning what I earn for a couple of reasons, one because I have been able to save a LOT, and have been able to finish paying off our house. It will also allow me to retire earlier. We donĀ“t spend anywhere near that amount, and most people would probably think our income is much lower.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
inotu-unotme



Joined: 26 May 2013
Posts: 197

PostPosted: Thu Jan 29, 2015 1:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

mtiz... I have been teaching online a little over a year now. It is a real job. But, I do miss teaching children. I was just talking to my husband about getting back into the classroom.

There are 2 companies I work for. One does not pay a lot and is located in China but they give me all the hours you want and lets me make my own schedule.

With the other company I have to wait for them to fill my schedule. It takes longer for me to get work. I get paid more per hour with them but get less hours and the sessions are all over the place. I seldom get two 30 minute sessions back to back.

In the end the company in China ends up working better for me. There are people who talk about online companies that pay a large amount of money online and say things are great all the time. However, I feel most teachers deal with online companies and situations similar to what I have posted.


Last edited by inotu-unotme on Sun Apr 05, 2015 2:27 am; edited 1 time in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Fitzgerald



Joined: 10 Aug 2010
Posts: 224

PostPosted: Sun Feb 01, 2015 7:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

inotu-unotme wrote:
mtiz... I have been teaching online a little over a year now. It is a real job. I do miss teaching children. I was just talking to my husband about getting back into the classroom.

There are 2 companies I work for. One does not pay a lot and is located in China. But, the company located in China gives all the hours you want and lets me make my own schedule.

With the other company I have to wait for them to fill my schedule. It takes longer for me to get work through them. And although they pay more per hour I get less hours with them and the sessions are all over the place throughout my day. I seldom get to 30 minute sessions one after the other.

In the end the company in China ends up working better for me. There are people who talk about online companies that pay a large amount of money online and say things are great all the time. However, I feel most teachers deal with online companies and situations similar to what I have posted.

Although I am new to online teaching, I can relate strongly in general to what you are saying here. I feel that it has become much harder to make a living in many fields. Automation, lowered wages, increased competition - all take their toll. Even 40,000 pesos per month, which I agree is fairly munificent by Mexican standards, only comes out to about $32,000 per year USD at the current exchange rate.

I'm 56 now, and I have carefully analyzed the earnings patterns over the course of my life. If all my yearly earnings are translated into current dollar amounts, then I hit my peak earnings around 1988, when I was 30, even though I have obtained a master's degree since then, and have held higher titles. I always had a bachelor's degree from a highly selective university, for what it's worth.

Neither of my parents, both born in 1933, had a university degree - my dad was a salesman and my mom was a nurse (for which she did attend a couple of years of nursing school). They lived in New Jersey, currently one of the most expensive states. Yet they easily bought a lovely new home in the Jersey suburbs on a quarter-acre of property, barely 20 miles from and an easy highway commute to Manhattan. Imagine what that goes for nowadays. My dad bought a brand-new car like clockwork every two years. All three of us kids went to private or Catholic schools.

Today, almost all my friends and family, all of whom have much higher educational attainments than my parents, have struggled in recent years with layoffs, extended periods of unemployment, subsequent underemployment, and so on. My own experiences along those lines are a big part of the reason why I went international in 2010, and I continue to be glad that I did so. But it is assuredly no picnic out here in the wider world either.


Last edited by Fitzgerald on Thu Mar 26, 2015 3:18 am; edited 1 time in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
jimpellow



Joined: 12 Oct 2007
Posts: 892

PostPosted: Tue Feb 24, 2015 6:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have taught online and worked in schools in the Mid East and a couple countries in Asia. I have my own online business for something unrelated, but have been looking at teaching online since coming here a few months back.

A few things to add that I did not see or maybe missed.

You do have to prove that you have a good and stable Internet connection. The better schools will insist on wired connections.

Can be tough in terms of your time clock and schedule as most of the schools are not in the Americas in terms of time zone. For example, many Asian schools are busiest when it is 5am our time. Too early for me!

Chinese schools are the easiest to work for and pay is not so great. Japanese and Korean schools pay far better, but if you look at their teacher profiles, they age discriminate quite a bit.

Russian schools were paying well and growing, but many seem to be affected by the recent economic turmoil in ways which makes me steer clear of them for now.

A couple Middle East schools out there now. Gulf students tend to very friendly and respectful, but don't go that route if you like to teach grammar in a structured class. European schools may be the best bet right now for pay and other factors combined.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Fitzgerald



Joined: 10 Aug 2010
Posts: 224

PostPosted: Tue Feb 24, 2015 10:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

jimpellow wrote:
I have taught online and worked in schools in the Mid East and a couple countries in Asia. I have my own online business for something unrelated, but have been looking at teaching online since coming here a few months back.

A few things to add that I did not see or maybe missed.

You do have to prove that you have a good and stable Internet connection. The better schools will insist on wired connections.

Can be tough in terms of your time clock and schedule as most of the schools are not in the Americas in terms of time zone. For example, many Asian schools are busiest when it is 5am our time. Too early for me!

Chinese schools are the easiest to work for and pay is not so great. Japanese and Korean schools pay far better, but if you look at their teacher profiles, they age discriminate quite a bit.

Russian schools were paying well and growing, but many seem to be affected by the recent economic turmoil in ways which makes me steer clear of them for now.

A couple Middle East schools out there now. Gulf students tend to very friendly and respectful, but don't go that route if you like to teach grammar in a structured class. European schools may be the best bet right now for pay and other factors combined.

Very interesting comments. I agree about the Russian schools. One told me that they were not hiring because of the economic situation.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
jimpellow



Joined: 12 Oct 2007
Posts: 892

PostPosted: Wed Mar 25, 2015 3:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well, I must follow up my own response as I indeed took an online job that is about to end after two weeks.

It was with a Saudi firm that pays 45USD to teach a three hour class to a group. You can teach two classes a day if you want. Bit long as you can imagine, but easy and the students were kind and motivated adults. I did Saudi for six months and found the young men at two very prestigious institutions to be some of the kindest and laziest students that have ever existed in the history of ESL. This online school though has mostly Saudi and other Middle Eastern women, and the lack of opportunities in their own countries makes them hungry as students.

The problem is that the school uses Adobe Connect, which is resource and bandwidth greedy for the class presenter and it chokes on the bad upload speeds that seem to plague Merida, or at least with the different locations and computers that I tried.

Obviously, there are lots of expats teaching online in Mexico successfully. But doing so through a tool like Skype may be more feasible considering that the Internet is not always quite up to First World standards.

I was also contacted by a Japanese online school since my last post who ended up telling me quickly that Mexico was on their blacklist due to Internet issues. Then again I did have a previous interview with another Japanese school that had no problem with Mexico, though the hiring manager seemed to have a problem with me being 48.

So the offered moral of this wandering post is that the quality of the Internet may or may not come into play for teaching ESL online from Mexico.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Fitzgerald



Joined: 10 Aug 2010
Posts: 224

PostPosted: Wed Mar 25, 2015 3:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

jimpellow wrote:
Well, I must follow up my own response as I indeed took an online job that is about to end after two weeks.

It was with a Saudi firm that pays 45USD to teach a three hour class to a group. You can teach two classes a day if you want. Bit long as you can imagine, but easy and the students were kind and motivated adults. I did Saudi for six months and found the young men at two very prestigious institutions to be some of the kindest and laziest students that have ever existed in the history of ESL. This online school though has mostly Saudi and other Middle Eastern women, and the lack of opportunities in their own countries makes them hungry as students.

The problem is that the school uses Adobe Connect, which is resource and bandwidth greedy for the class presenter and it chokes on the bad upload speeds that seem to plague Merida, or at least with the different locations and computers that I tried.

Obviously, there are lots of expats teaching online in Mexico successfully. But doing so through a tool like Skype may be more feasible considering that the Internet is not always quite up to First World standards.

I was also contacted by a Japanese online school since my last post who ended up telling me quickly that Mexico was on their blacklist due to Internet issues. Then again I did have a previous interview with another Japanese school that had no problem with Mexico, though the hiring manager seemed to have a problem with me being 48.

So the offered moral of this wandering post is that the quality of the Internet may or may not come into play for teaching ESL online from Mexico.

Very interesting information. I was going to say, I can't believe the Japanese manager thought you were too old at 48, but then I stopped myself and considered. Unfortunately, I can all too easily believe it.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
AGoodStory



Joined: 26 Feb 2010
Posts: 738

PostPosted: Wed Mar 25, 2015 12:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:

. Then again I did have a previous interview with another Japanese school that had no problem with Mexico, though the hiring manager seemed to have a problem with me being 48.




But you are just a youngster! Ah, to be 48 . . .


.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
jimpellow



Joined: 12 Oct 2007
Posts: 892

PostPosted: Wed Mar 25, 2015 10:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

AGoodStory wrote:
Quote:

. Then again I did have a previous interview with another Japanese school that had no problem with Mexico, though the hiring manager seemed to have a problem with me being 48.




But you are just a youngster! Ah, to be 48 . . .


.


Ah, you just made my day. Smile Even the JET program in Japan would not hire those over 35, though that has recently changed. But there are teachers much older than me in Japan who were able to get into schools by knocking on doors.

I taught Japanese businesspeople, when I lived in the Philippines, Business English and they loved me (pat myself on back). Not only because I am very good at it (just don't start asking me grammar and spelling questions), but they said in Japan the vast majority of Business English teachers were quite young, and had no actual knowledge of business beyond the book. But that is what the schools think is best, and so it is.

So to keep on track with the thread, it can be a hurdle in terms of securing online employment with these Asian schools, but is not always a roadblock.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Fitzgerald



Joined: 10 Aug 2010
Posts: 224

PostPosted: Wed Mar 25, 2015 10:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

jimpellow wrote:

Ah, you just made my day. Smile Even the JET program in Japan would not hire those over 35, though that has recently changed. But there are teachers much older than me in Japan who were able to get into schools by knocking on doors.

I taught Japanese businesspeople, when I lived in the Philippines, Business English and they loved me (pat myself on back). Not only because I am very good at it (just don't start asking me grammar and spelling questions), but they said in Japan the vast majority of Business English teachers were quite young, and had no actual knowledge of business beyond the book. But that is what the schools think is best, and so it is.

So to keep on track with the thread, it can be a hurdle in terms of securing online employment with these Asian schools, but is not always a roadblock.

I was lucky in Korea, I guess, because my school director, although hardly a prince in other ways, had STOPPED hiring teachers under 30. Too unreliable, he said; he had had many bad experiences (some of which were legend around the school, like the soju-soaked teacher who simply disappeared for three days).

It is quite true that forms of discrimination - gender, age, race, sexual orientation, etc. - to which Americans have at least become sensitized, don't raise so much as an eyebrow in East Asia, or in much of the rest of the world either.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
DebMer



Joined: 02 Jan 2012
Posts: 232
Location: Southern California

PostPosted: Thu Mar 26, 2015 12:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

jimpellow wrote:
Well, I must follow up my own response as I indeed took an online job that is about to end after two weeks.

It was with a Saudi firm that pays 45USD to teach a three hour class to a group. You can teach two classes a day if you want. Bit long as you can imagine, but easy and the students were kind and motivated adults. I did Saudi for six months and found the young men at two very prestigious institutions to be some of the kindest and laziest students that have ever existed in the history of ESL. This online school though has mostly Saudi and other Middle Eastern women, and the lack of opportunities in their own countries makes them hungry as students.

The problem is that the school uses Adobe Connect, which is resource and bandwidth greedy for the class presenter and it chokes on the bad upload speeds that seem to plague Merida, or at least with the different locations and computers that I tried.

Obviously, there are lots of expats teaching online in Mexico successfully. But doing so through a tool like Skype may be more feasible considering that the Internet is not always quite up to First World standards.

I was also contacted by a Japanese online school since my last post who ended up telling me quickly that Mexico was on their blacklist due to Internet issues. Then again I did have a previous interview with another Japanese school that had no problem with Mexico, though the hiring manager seemed to have a problem with me being 48.

So the offered moral of this wandering post is that the quality of the Internet may or may not come into play for teaching ESL online from Mexico.


$45/hour, or $45/class?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
jimpellow



Joined: 12 Oct 2007
Posts: 892

PostPosted: Thu Mar 26, 2015 3:09 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

"$45/hour, or $45/class?"

A class. Highest I have heard of an hour is 20 from a couple Japanese schools.

Yes, Fitzgerald, your observations are astute as always.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
DebMer



Joined: 02 Jan 2012
Posts: 232
Location: Southern California

PostPosted: Thu Mar 26, 2015 3:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

jimpellow wrote:
"$45/hour, or $45/class?"

A class. Highest I have heard of an hour is 20 from a couple Japanese schools.

Yes, Fitzgerald, your observations are astute as always.


That's what I was afraid of. Wink Although in Mexico that would be a pretty sweet wage.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
NorthofAmerica



Joined: 17 Jul 2006
Posts: 187
Location: China

PostPosted: Wed Apr 08, 2015 3:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Can't believe I waited so long before coming back to this forum! So much good stuff in here!!

I arrived in Playa a few months ago with my fiancee, who's local, and originally started using elance.com to do some editing, proofreading, and ghostwriting. I thought it would be simple enough to earn 5k in pesos and draw from savings from when I was in China. We already have a house and if you are not traveling but just exercising, gaming, and hitting the beach life is cheap Smile

Still, I am now in my second week with ZERO earnings. Often I find jobs just to have people disappear or become all sketchy. That was this week, started with a bunch of articles to write and then the guy just disappears without funding the account. I was hired to translate some Chinese articles but after doing 1 I have been playing tag on skype to line up more work for over a week. And I spend a lot of time writing and browsing work that ultimately is unpaid labour in and of itself.

Suffice to say, it hasn't been enough to make it worth it and I am looking at teaching online but since day one I've worried about the internet connection here. We are on a wifi network in the suburbs, I thought I might just hit a cafe with a solid connection if I can line up 2-3+ hours of paid teaching at a time.

Saw an ad at Berlitz yesterday so gonna pop my head in there. I have 8+ years experience, a TEFL, and was a school manager in China so I hope to have some luck with a local school.

Will check out these links listed, thanks for all the great info and good luck to everyone!

Living in a tropical paradise and working online is a 21st century luxury that I never fail to appreciate Smile
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message MSN Messenger
AGoodStory



Joined: 26 Feb 2010
Posts: 738

PostPosted: Wed Apr 08, 2015 5:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:


Living in a tropical paradise and working online is a 21st century luxury that I never fail to appreciate



The best of two worlds! Welcome back to the forum, NorthofAmerica! Very Happy


.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Job Discussion Forums Forum Index -> Mexico All times are GMT
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5  Next
Page 2 of 5

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


This page is maintained by the one and only Dave Sperling.
Contact Dave's ESL Cafe
Copyright © 2018 Dave Sperling. All Rights Reserved.

Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2002 phpBB Group

Teaching Jobs in China
Teaching Jobs in China