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Work Permits in Turkey (Beware)

 
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Redcar24



Joined: 26 Aug 2011
Posts: 57
Location: Al Hassa Saudi Arabia

PostPosted: Sat Jun 13, 2015 7:46 am    Post subject: Work Permits in Turkey (Beware) Reply with quote

FYI:

Do not think it is easy to apply for work permits or jobs in Turkey on the current visa rules. Employers are still telling you come here and apply.

1st Illegal you will be heavily fined by the government now.
2nd current visa rules are thirty days stay on a sixty day visa and apply after three months.
3rd Employers know and they cheat you for salary and time.

I was recently emailed by a current company

Dear xxxxx,

I want to apply for a work permit before I work in Turkey. As per the new rules you can only enter Turkey for 6 months and stay for 3 months. I have only two and a half months left on my visa before it expires in September. My residence visa expired in March 2105

Reply

If you will work in Turkey you can come on a tourist visa and your employer in Turkey can get all your permits in 30 days here.
Regards
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nichtta



Joined: 25 Apr 2015
Posts: 110
Location: Istanbul, Turkey

PostPosted: Sat Jun 13, 2015 8:16 am    Post subject: Re: Work Permits in Turkey (Beware) Reply with quote

Quote:
If you will work in Turkey you can come on a tourist visa and your employer in Turkey can get all your permits in 30 days here.


I just wanted to confirm that this statement is false.

Quote:
Please note that e-visa is only valid when the purpose of travel is tourism or commerce. For other purposes, such as work and study, visas are given by Turkish Embassies or Consulates.


Quote:
Information on Work Visa: To work in Turkey, you must apply to the nearest Turkish mission to obtain work permit and visa. Your passport, visa application form and a letter from your employer are the necessary documents for your application. Other documents should be submitted to the Turkish Ministry of Labour and Social Security (MLSS) by your employer within ten working days after your application.

You may find the list of those documents in the MLSS’s website (http://www.csgb.gov.tr). Applications are finalized by the MLSS within thirty days at the latest. Right after your arrival in Turkey (before starting to work), you should be registered at the local police department within one month to obtain the necessary residence permit.


Source: http://www.mfa.gov.tr/visa-information-for-foreigners.en.mfa

Not only is a tourist visa, which allows for a 90-day stay within a 180-day period, not sufficient for a work permit. Even a tourist residence permit isn't sufficient unless it's valid for at least six months, presumably at the time of the work permit application.

Quote:
The application should be made from the country of origin, that is via the Turkish Consulate in London for British nationals as well as foreign nationals resident in the UK , unless they are the holder of a residence permit for Turkey which is valid for at least 6 months. Applications for extension of a given work permit can be made in Turkey if accompanied by a valid residence permit.


Source: http://www.turkishconsulate.org.uk/en/work_visa.asp

Quote:
One can file an application to obtain a work permit in Turkey either while located in Turkey or abroad.

In the case of applications filed abroad, foreigners are required to file an application at a consulate of the Republic of Turkey in the country of which they are a citizen or a permanent resident. The application should be accompanied by a labor contract, letter of assignment, or a document stating company partnership. The employer in Turkey is required to file an online application and submit the required information and documents to the Ministry of Labor and Social Security, either in person or via mail, within ten business days following the date of the candidate’s application to a consulate. The consulates of the Republic of Turkey and the ministry will execute online the procedures for the work permit applications filed abroad.

Foreigners whose applications are approved by the Ministry of Labor and Social Security must enter Turkey within a maximum of ninety days after the date the work permt is issued.

In the case of applications filed in Turkey, with the exception of residence permits issued for education in Turkey, foreigners who hold residence permits with a remaining term of at least six months, or employers thereof, may file work permit applications. Such foreigners are not required to submit an application to the consulates of the Republic of Turkey. The documents required for the application must be submitted to the Ministry of Labor and Social Security, either in person or via mail, within a maximum of six business days after the online application.


Source: http://www.invest.gov.tr/en-US/investmentguide/investorsguide/comingtoturkey/Pages/HowToGetAWorkPermit.aspx
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JohnRambo



Joined: 06 Mar 2008
Posts: 182

PostPosted: Sun Jun 14, 2015 4:53 am    Post subject: Re: Work Permits in Turkey (Beware) Reply with quote

Redcar24 wrote:
FYI:

Do not think it is easy to apply for work permits or jobs in Turkey on the current visa rules. Employers are still telling you come here and apply.

1st Illegal you will be heavily fined by the government now.
2nd current visa rules are thirty days stay on a sixty day visa and apply after three months.
3rd Employers know and they cheat you for salary and time.

I was recently emailed by a current company

Dear xxxxx,

I want to apply for a work permit before I work in Turkey. As per the new rules you can only enter Turkey for 6 months and stay for 3 months. I have only two and a half months left on my visa before it expires in September. My residence visa expired in March 2105

Reply

If you will work in Turkey you can come on a tourist visa and your employer in Turkey can get all your permits in 30 days here.
Regards



What about my case? I am not in the country. I have both a residency permit and a work permit. It took me a while to get the latter. I will apply for a work visa next week when I go to the Turkish Embassy in Seoul. I have a question. How long does it take to get an ID card? I am thinking of flying in and then leaving after 3 weeks to visit family in the US. Since I have the other permits, is it doable or not? I would rather fly to the U.S., but my brother, who I would be staying with, will be in Florida in late July.

What do I have left to do after the work permit, residency permit, and work visa? And how long does that take? I have to know before I book any flights.
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nichtta



Joined: 25 Apr 2015
Posts: 110
Location: Istanbul, Turkey

PostPosted: Sun Jun 14, 2015 6:39 am    Post subject: Re: Work Permits in Turkey (Beware) Reply with quote

JohnRambo wrote:
What about my case? I am not in the country. I have both a residency permit and a work permit. It took me a while to get the latter. I will apply for a work visa next week when I go to the Turkish Embassy in Seoul.


I'm confused. If you already have a residence and work permit, why are you applying for a work visa? Is it because these expire soon? From my understanding, unless the rules and regulations recently changed, which wouldn't be a surprise, the work visa is what you get before the residence permit and work permit.

JohnRambo wrote:
How long does it take to get an ID card?


If you already have a residence permit and a work permit, these are sufficient as ID cards. When you enter the country, you'll be asked for your passport plus your residence permit. This is pink card and doesn't have your picture on it. However, your work permit is a blue card and should have your picture on it.

JohnRambo wrote:
What do I have left to do after the work permit, residency permit, and work visa?


There's nothing else left in terms of getting in the country. However, once you're in, you'll have your own adventures. Feel free to ask for help on these forums. Good luck! Smile
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JohnRambo



Joined: 06 Mar 2008
Posts: 182

PostPosted: Sun Jun 14, 2015 7:06 am    Post subject: Re: Work Permits in Turkey (Beware) Reply with quote

nichtta wrote:
JohnRambo wrote:
What about my case? I am not in the country. I have both a residency permit and a work permit. It took me a while to get the latter. I will apply for a work visa next week when I go to the Turkish Embassy in Seoul.


I'm confused. If you already have a residence and work permit, why are you applying for a work visa? Is it because these expire soon? From my understanding, unless the rules and regulations recently changed, which wouldn't be a surprise, the work visa is what you get before the residence permit and work permit.

JohnRambo wrote:
How long does it take to get an ID card?


If you already have a residence permit and a work permit, these are sufficient as ID cards. When you enter the country, you'll be asked for your passport plus your residence permit. This is pink card and doesn't have your picture on it. However, your work permit is a blue card and should have your picture on it.

JohnRambo wrote:
What do I have left to do after the work permit, residency permit, and work visa?


There's nothing else left in terms of getting in the country. However, once you're in, you'll have your own adventures. Feel free to ask for help on these forums. Good luck! Smile



How long have you been over there? I hope you're having some nice adventures over there. I appreciate you answering my questions. Generally, I hate asking questions. I like doing my own research, but the information's not quite out there due to changes in regulations. The regulations changed about 2 years ago, according to what I was told.

Do you not need a work visa in your passport if you're coming from outside of Turkey? I do have scanned photocopies of a letter saying I was approved to work by Ankara for a university, and the required fees to pay for a work and residence permit. I sent the university the money to pay those fees.
That said, I don't have anything pink or blue, just scans of what they did?

I contacted the Turkish Embassy. I told them I have a residency permit and work permit, and they didn't tell me that I don't need a work visa inside my passport. They told me to bring copies of what the university sent me. I had the impression that I have to have a visa in my passport. Is this correct or incorrect?
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nichtta



Joined: 25 Apr 2015
Posts: 110
Location: Istanbul, Turkey

PostPosted: Sun Jun 14, 2015 10:39 am    Post subject: Re: Work Permits in Turkey (Beware) Reply with quote

JohnRambo wrote:
I appreciate you answering my questions. Generally, I hate asking questions. I like doing my own research, but the information's not quite out there due to changes in regulations.


Haha, no need to hesitate asking questions here. That's what this forum is for! Turkey, especially Istanbul, can sometimes feel like a dog-eat-dog world. It's can be really rough here for us foreigners, so it's best to ask others, find out about others' experiences, and help each other out. In fact, we have to do so in order to survive here or anywhere else where we're the minority. "United we stand, divided we fall."

However, I'm sorry I'm honestly not sure about your circumstances and don't want to give you wrong information or just guess about something so important.

I can tell you this much. I've never been in a situation where I had a residence permit but not a residence permit card (the pink one). Therefore it's not clear whether you're in Turkey's system or not as a resident, and I don't think your paperwork would suffice. Here's an example of how one looks:

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-I8ooQ6TNUw8/U7bzsor72JI/AAAAAAAAAlc/zH5aSaPjSgM/s1600/oturum.jpg

I have also never been in a situation where I had a work permit but not a work permit card (the blue one). When I applied, it was from within the country when I had a residence permit card valid for at least another six months. Therefore I just waited no more than 30 days then was given the work permit card by my employer. However, I don't recommend this route, which used to be done by many teachers and maybe still is, to anyone. Here's how one of those looks:

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-_eqXjbXY1QE/U7b1n72Mr9I/AAAAAAAAAlo/Y1TEgQEX5Qg/s1600/calisma+copy.jpg

If you're in touch with the embassy, they should know the most up to date information, but such is unfortunately not always the case what with the changing rules, regulations, and procedures here in Turkey, which occur without all responsible individuals being on the same page about them. You may experience this at your workplace, too. Perhaps it's just a part of how things are done here. You kind of get into a weird place of comfort not knowing what's coming next, as weird as that sounds. Ah, but I digress...

I couldn't find a picture of a work visa and how it looks, but it may very well be something put in your passport as either a stamp or a sticker. If you end up successfully getting one, which I hope you do, please do post it somewhere online after blurring or blacking out any personal details just so we can see how one looks.
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JohnRambo



Joined: 06 Mar 2008
Posts: 182

PostPosted: Sun Jun 14, 2015 3:30 pm    Post subject: Re: Work Permits in Turkey (Beware) Reply with quote

nichtta wrote:
JohnRambo wrote:
I appreciate you answering my questions. Generally, I hate asking questions. I like doing my own research, but the information's not quite out there due to changes in regulations.


Haha, no need to hesitate asking questions here. That's what this forum is for! Turkey, especially Istanbul, can sometimes feel like a dog-eat-dog world. It's can be really rough here for us foreigners, so it's best to ask others, find out about others' experiences, and help each other out. In fact, we have to do so in order to survive here or anywhere else where we're the minority. "United we stand, divided we fall."

However, I'm sorry I'm honestly not sure about your circumstances and don't want to give you wrong information or just guess about something so important.

I can tell you this much. I've never been in a situation where I had a residence permit but not a residence permit card (the pink one). Therefore it's not clear whether you're in Turkey's system or not as a resident, and I don't think your paperwork would suffice. Here's an example of how one looks:

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-I8ooQ6TNUw8/U7bzsor72JI/AAAAAAAAAlc/zH5aSaPjSgM/s1600/oturum.jpg

I have also never been in a situation where I had a work permit but not a work permit card (the blue one). When I applied, it was from within the country when I had a residence permit card valid for at least another six months. Therefore I just waited no more than 30 days then was given the work permit card by my employer. However, I don't recommend this route, which used to be done by many teachers and maybe still is, to anyone. Here's how one of those looks:

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-_eqXjbXY1QE/U7b1n72Mr9I/AAAAAAAAAlo/Y1TEgQEX5Qg/s1600/calisma+copy.jpg

If you're in touch with the embassy, they should know the most up to date information, but such is unfortunately not always the case what with the changing rules, regulations, and procedures here in Turkey, which occur without all responsible individuals being on the same page about them. You may experience this at your workplace, too. Perhaps it's just a part of how things are done here. You kind of get into a weird place of comfort not knowing what's coming next, as weird as that sounds. Ah, but I digress...

I couldn't find a picture of a work visa and how it looks, but it may very well be something put in your passport as either a stamp or a sticker. If you end up successfully getting one, which I hope you do, please do post it somewhere online after blurring or blacking out any personal details just so we can see how one looks.


I will let you know if I get a work visa. I am not surprised by what you wrote. My case is different. It's because a university is doing the paperwork for me while I'm outside, which is atypical. Usually, people are in-country and come on a tourist visa.

I think, in my case, I will get the work visa soon, come at the end of July, get an address and a flat, apply for a bank account quickly and get those cards you mentioned. I do have a Turkish friend who might be able to help me.


Out-of-curiosity, why do you think it's rough for foreigners in Istanbul? I only have the experience of having worked in South Korea. I've dealt with my share of annoying things, and it didn't help to have a massive language barrier. That's why I'm making a huge effort to pick up Turkish. I study every week.

I hope to meet some expats when I go there. I know one so far, and I have several Turkish friends.

It's understandable that the visa process can be confusing. When I was told to have a friend do some paperwork and get my residence permit, the tax office sent my friend back and told him something wrong. And, then, representatives of the university went there, and they were able to get the paperwork. I will prepare my paperwork for the embassy tomorrow and go on Wednesday and let you know what happens, then.
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nichtta



Joined: 25 Apr 2015
Posts: 110
Location: Istanbul, Turkey

PostPosted: Sun Jun 14, 2015 5:22 pm    Post subject: Re: Work Permits in Turkey (Beware) Reply with quote

JohnRambo wrote:
Out-of-curiosity, why do you think it's rough for foreigners in Istanbul? I only have the experience of having worked in South Korea. I've dealt with my share of annoying things, and it didn't help to have a massive language barrier. That's why I'm making a huge effort to pick up Turkish. I study every week.


1) The government seems to be making it more and more difficult for foreigners to live here as time passes by. I don't feel wanted here and have read about many ex-pats leaving in recent years because of the changes, but I will continue trying my best to work through the "system."

2) The employers, and I mean private ones, want you to work really hard on an endless amount of projects and tasks, not wanting to really limit your hours, then don't treat you well, pay you enough, or provide good benefits. Of course, there are many exceptions to this. That's precisely why we need to do our research, know our value, and be firm about our demands. I think it takes rejecting bad offers for them to start giving us what we deserve.

3) If you're not used to the way many things are run here (extremely poor planning, last-minute changes, big ideas with very short deadlines, not wanting to take responsibility for things, etc.), it can be a very big, frustrating test. However, it builds patience, and with realistic expectations along with learning how the "system," if you want to call it that, works, you'll do just fine.

Don't get me wrong. The people here are generally very, very nice and helpful. It's a beautiful culture, which values honoring and being generous toward the guest. I also like how diverse Istanbul is--a place where east meets west. There's a rich history here and lots of interesting cities to visit on weekends or during breaks where you'll find remains from all sorts of ancient civilizations. I think it's a wonderful place to live, and it's really worth coming here for at least a year. Turks with whom I've interacted have been very patient with my broken Turkish, but it definitely helps to work on your language so as to not depend (either at all or at as much) on others.
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JohnRambo



Joined: 06 Mar 2008
Posts: 182

PostPosted: Thu Jun 18, 2015 9:28 am    Post subject: Re: Work Permits in Turkey (Beware) Reply with quote

nichtta wrote:
JohnRambo wrote:
Out-of-curiosity, why do you think it's rough for foreigners in Istanbul? I only have the experience of having worked in South Korea. I've dealt with my share of annoying things, and it didn't help to have a massive language barrier. That's why I'm making a huge effort to pick up Turkish. I study every week.


1) The government seems to be making it more and more difficult for foreigners to live here as time passes by. I don't feel wanted here and have read about many ex-pats leaving in recent years because of the changes, but I will continue trying my best to work through the "system."

2) The employers, and I mean private ones, want you to work really hard on an endless amount of projects and tasks, not wanting to really limit your hours, then don't treat you well, pay you enough, or provide good benefits. Of course, there are many exceptions to this. That's precisely why we need to do our research, know our value, and be firm about our demands. I think it takes rejecting bad offers for them to start giving us what we deserve.

3) If you're not used to the way many things are run here (extremely poor planning, last-minute changes, big ideas with very short deadlines, not wanting to take responsibility for things, etc.), it can be a very big, frustrating test. However, it builds patience, and with realistic expectations along with learning how the "system," if you want to call it that, works, you'll do just fine.

Don't get me wrong. The people here are generally very, very nice and helpful. It's a beautiful culture, which values honoring and being generous toward the guest. I also like how diverse Istanbul is--a place where east meets west. There's a rich history here and lots of interesting cities to visit on weekends or during breaks where you'll find remains from all sorts of ancient civilizations. I think it's a wonderful place to live, and it's really worth coming here for at least a year. Turks with whom I've interacted have been very patient with my broken Turkish, but it definitely helps to work on your language so as to not depend (either at all or at as much) on others.


I went to the embassy today on a fact-finding mission to know if I need a visa in my passport or not. I showed them my work permission letter and numbers from Ankara, but the lady I dealt with insisted I will have to have a work visa in my passport. That makes sense to me as I am applying from abroad. I will have to go back on Monday with some passport photos, a copy of my passport, the application form filled out (I did that already just in case), a local criminal background check. At least, if I get a work visa in my passport, I won't have any problems when entering, and I won't have to bother with first getting a tourist visa.

As far as good jobs, a friend of mine in Turkey seems to have a better job with tons of vacation. I could see about getting something like that later since I have a lot of qualifications. I'm used to jobs that give you a decent amount of time off. I don't mind working for a public school, if I must. I can look into that later.

As far as the culture and language, the Turks can be very friendly. I will do my best to pick up Turkish. I already understand a lot and can speak decent broken Turkish. I look Turkish, and one grandparent was from Turkey. That is one reason I would have to work harder at picking up the language. I've spent a crazy amount of hours these past 8 months studying the language.

I will keep you updated.
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Kim Macintosh



Joined: 26 Dec 2013
Posts: 43

PostPosted: Thu Jun 18, 2015 3:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

A lot of the confusion seems to be due to the transition from the old, cobbled-together system interpreted and managed differently by each province, and a centralized new system/ministry that has been phased-in over the last year.

I don't see a lot of the laxity that previously prevailed continuing, such as teachers working on a RP rather than a WP. The fact is that this will come down to enforcement: Turkey wants, needs, and values English teachers, and there are plenty of other undesireables they'll round-up first. But even getting a RP has become an onerous proposition unless you're either rich or retired (with a sufficiently large pension).

Bottom line, IMHO, is that unless the govt backtracks (and they may, given the underlying demand for English teachers), the only people who are going to be working here legally are folks with serious jobs at serious schools, which have the administrative wherewithal to cope with a WP.

That suggests more Skype interviews, fronted airfares, and serious teaching qualifications. Again, unless the system being implemented is modified. Water does tend to find its way around whatever barriers exist, and the underlying demand for simple TEFL/Unrelated-BA folks is not going to just go away. It'll be interesting to see how this all shakes out.
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JohnRambo



Joined: 06 Mar 2008
Posts: 182

PostPosted: Tue Jun 23, 2015 1:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Kim Macintosh wrote:
A lot of the confusion seems to be due to the transition from the old, cobbled-together system interpreted and managed differently by each province, and a centralized new system/ministry that has been phased-in over the last year.

I don't see a lot of the laxity that previously prevailed continuing, such as teachers working on a RP rather than a WP. The fact is that this will come down to enforcement: Turkey wants, needs, and values English teachers, and there are plenty of other undesireables they'll round-up first. But even getting a RP has become an onerous proposition unless you're either rich or retired (with a sufficiently large pension).

Bottom line, IMHO, is that unless the govt backtracks (and they may, given the underlying demand for English teachers), the only people who are going to be working here legally are folks with serious jobs at serious schools, which have the administrative wherewithal to cope with a WP.

That suggests more Skype interviews, fronted airfares, and serious teaching qualifications. Again, unless the system being implemented is modified. Water does tend to find its way around whatever barriers exist, and the underlying demand for simple TEFL/Unrelated-BA folks is not going to just go away. It'll be interesting to see how this all shakes out.


I can understand there's confusion and changes. I wanted to be on the safe side and listened to what the Turkish Embassy in South Korea said.
They insisted I get a work visa in my passport, though I had a work permit issued in Turkey. It would probably make things smoother for me when I enter. The work visa says I have 90 days to get things done, essentially.

I'm planning on first finding an apartment, setting up a bank account and then getting the cards I need.
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