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U.S. schools scurry to hire P.S. Teachers
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peripatetic_soul



Joined: 20 Oct 2013
Posts: 291

PostPosted: Sun Aug 09, 2015 10:28 pm    Post subject: U.S. schools scurry to hire P.S. Teachers Reply with quote

The shortage due to recession and downsizing of public school teachers has finally caught up with us:
http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/teacher-shortages-spur-a-hiring-scramble-credentials-optional/ar-BBlzRXa?ocid=spartandhp

Gee, no kidding! Cross-posted in General Discussion.

Regards,
PS
Idea
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esl_prof



Joined: 30 Nov 2013
Posts: 2006
Location: peyi kote solèy frèt

PostPosted: Sun Aug 09, 2015 11:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

My wife's already received several calls this month, and she's not even actively looking for another job right now.
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JN



Joined: 17 Jan 2008
Posts: 214

PostPosted: Mon Aug 10, 2015 7:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hmm...teaching and going to classes at the same time to become accredited. I've often wondered if I could do that. I wonder if there are ESL positions open or positions for someone with knowledge of German or Russian.
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peripatetic_soul



Joined: 20 Oct 2013
Posts: 291

PostPosted: Mon Aug 10, 2015 12:07 pm    Post subject: U.S. schools scurry to hire P.S. Teachers Reply with quote

Dear JN,

You could check out local school district websites to see if ESL is on their list of openings. I have seen so many adverts for Mecklenberg, NC, for example. Not sure where you're located but the ESL population doesn't seem to be on the decline. In fact, in our surrounding school districts, several new schools have been built and our ESL population is overflowing.

Interesting, esl_prof.

We need more enthusiastic, talented teachers who understand what it's like to struggle in acquiring a second language. Go for it! Good luck!

PS
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JN



Joined: 17 Jan 2008
Posts: 214

PostPosted: Thu Aug 13, 2015 11:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for the information. I did check out some of the district ESL openings in NC. I'm actually currently in Germany and have a contract here for a year. I'm open to anywhere in the U.S. NC would be cool, as I have relatives there.

So is it really possible to step into an ESL job without teaching credentials? I have an MATESOL and a B.A in International Studies. I have a few years experience in teaching ESL/EFL with adults and children. I know I could work well with teaching Elementary kids ESL.
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peripatetic_soul



Joined: 20 Oct 2013
Posts: 291

PostPosted: Thu Aug 13, 2015 2:08 pm    Post subject: U.S. schools scurry to hire P.S. Teachers Reply with quote

JN,
I accidentally hit PM instead of Post Reply so check your mailbox for response.

Basically, public school teachers must take the Praxis tests to obtain state teaching licensure. For ESL, one only needs to take the Praxis II test. It differs for content teachers. Since you have an M.A. in TESOL, which is quite beneficial, you will still need to submit your transcripts to the DOE for evaluation (to determine how many credits you need from the School of Education in compliance with public school coursework). I know; it seems silly since some ESL teachers do not have a Master's, as they transitioned from a content area into ESL, but the DOE wants to see those education courses (Foundations in Education, Educational Psychology, Teaching Reading in the Content Area, etc.).

By the way, you can often take those courses online through, e.g., Walden. And if you get hired on a probationary basis, you can pursue those courses while teaching, and tuition may be reimbursed if you earn at least a "C." Again, though, requirements vary considerably from state to state.

The Elementary school ESL population is constantly increasing. Good luck!

Regards,
PS
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BadBeagleBad



Joined: 23 Aug 2010
Posts: 1186
Location: 24.18105,-103.25185

PostPosted: Sun Aug 16, 2015 2:41 am    Post subject: Re: U.S. schools scurry to hire P.S. Teachers Reply with quote

peripatetic_soul wrote:
JN,
I accidentally hit PM instead of Post Reply so check your mailbox for response.

Basically, public school teachers must take the Praxis tests to obtain state teaching licensure. For ESL, one only needs to take the Praxis II test. It differs for content teachers. Since you have an M.A. in TESOL, which is quite beneficial, you will still need to submit your transcripts to the DOE for evaluation (to determine how many credits you need from the School of Education in compliance with public school coursework). I know; it seems silly since some ESL teachers do not have a Master's, as they transitioned from a content area into ESL, but the DOE wants to see those education courses (Foundations in Education, Educational Psychology, Teaching Reading in the Content Area, etc.).


PS


Just to add a couple of other things, the Praxis test is used in many, but not all states. You can't just take a Praxis test because you want to, you still have to have the coursework to back it up. Aside from that, you have to do student teaching, and not sure how you could do that online. I know some states allow first year teachers to have a mentor through some alternative programs. You also have to pass a background check and be drug tested and have a psychological test (not sure if this is in all states, but it was in the two states I was formerly certified in, IL and WI, one with Praxis and one with their own state administered test). There is NO WAY IN HELL I would ever go back to teaching in public schools in the US, and I got out 17 years ago. I shudder to think what it is like now.
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peripatetic_soul



Joined: 20 Oct 2013
Posts: 291

PostPosted: Sun Aug 16, 2015 1:55 pm    Post subject: U.S. Schools scurry to hire P.S. Teachers Reply with quote

So true, BB, that one has to submit transcripts to DOE for evaluation and must complete all course requirements PRIOR to taking the Praxis. Yes, licensure testing and credentialing vary from state to state.

I think all require finger printing (criminal background check) and chest x-ray or TB test. There SHOULD be drug testing in our state but there isn't. Credit history and driving records are investigated here as well. For relicensure every 5 years, at least in our state, one has to earn 180 cr. hours (vis-a-vis course work, PD, attendance at conferences, presentations, teaching at college, etc.).

As for p.s. teaching, the ESL population was a completely different group compared to native speakers in content courses. Of course, behavior management courses are also mandatory in our state. It's not the students who made p.s. teaching stressful for me, but the adminsuits, many of whom knew nothing about ESL or other cultures. It's a luck of the draw also in terms of the particular school where one is assigned. I enjoyed h.s. more than m.s. I had no experience with elementary level.

In any case, as I'm sure you'll agree, p.s. teachers are overworked, grossly underpaid and undervalued yet expected to serve as teacher, counselor, surrogate parent, materials provider, the beneficent multi-tasker. When I "retired" from a very short career in p.s., my blood pressure returned to normal!

Thanks for the clarification.
Regards,
PS


Cool
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Ixchel



Joined: 11 Mar 2003
Posts: 156
Location: The 7th level of hell

PostPosted: Sun Aug 16, 2015 2:47 pm    Post subject: Re: U.S. schools scurry to hire P.S. Teachers Reply with quote

peripatetic_soul wrote:
The shortage due to recession and downsizing of public school teachers has finally caught up with us:
http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/teacher-shortages-spur-a-hiring-scramble-credentials-optional/ar-BBlzRXa?ocid=spartandhp

Gee, no kidding! Cross-posted in General Discussion.

Regards,
PS
Idea

Not really. My mom started teaching in 1972 when there were no jobs. I started in 1989 when they couldn't fill positions because you had to be bilingual-I worked on an emergency credential. Four years ago in my suburban district there were 4,000 + applicants for 2 positions and people in their 30's who never got tenure because they got laid off and rehired each year. Now they need teachers again. That's the nature of education. There are plenty of people with teaching certs ( same thing happened with nursing - we were recruiting from South Africa and the Philipines until our nurses started dusting off their RNs- 60 Minutes even did a segment on foreign nurses, 5 years later you couldn't buy a nursing job) and a severe job shortage in general so teaching jobs won't go begging for long, crappy as they are.

I've been following the trends for 43 years and it's up and down. Doesn't matter if you have a doctorate, you still have to pass the tests and do the coursework, it takes some time and money. Also very few pure ESL classes anymore. Most districts require regular Ed teachers who have an ESL endorsement and students attend regular ed classes. Not all but most particularly in districts with lots of non- native speakers.
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JN



Joined: 17 Jan 2008
Posts: 214

PostPosted: Sun Aug 16, 2015 6:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

@PS - I did receive the PM and didn't immediately look at what you posted again. Thanks for the info. I did PM you back, but will also comment here. Thanks for reminding me about the Praxis test and giving me a tip on online courses. I have also heard teachers talk about problems with the administrative side of teaching.

Thanks to the others for their opinions and information. I would most certainly welcome doing student teaching. I will just have to think about everything, do some research and see what viable opportunities there are in the U.S. for me.
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BadBeagleBad



Joined: 23 Aug 2010
Posts: 1186
Location: 24.18105,-103.25185

PostPosted: Sun Aug 16, 2015 11:44 pm    Post subject: Re: U.S. Schools scurry to hire P.S. Teachers Reply with quote

peripatetic_soul wrote:


It's not the students who made p.s. teaching stressful for me, but the adminsuits, many of whom knew nothing about ESL or other cultures. It's a luck of the draw also in terms of the particular school where one is assigned. I enjoyed h.s. more than m.s. I had no experience with elementary level.



Cool


Exactly this. Not the kids at all, but the admin, who just piled on paperwork, made unreasonable demands, or, who would not let you know what was going on in the surrounding area. I once stumbled into the middle of a crime scene (murder) that had happened 3 hours before school was out, on the way to my car. They had not caught the guy and he was still in the area since that is where they found him later that night, and the school knew about it, but didn´t see fit to let the teachers know - knowing that many of us had to park outside the school grounds. Another time, a gang affiliated young man made threats against me and was following me to my car and the school refused to let the security guard walk me to my car, saying it would set a ¨bad example.¨ The other thing that really bothered me was that bad, even abusive teachers were rarely fired, just shuffled from school to school. One teacher who would tell students they were stupid, would be loser in life, etc. (like 4th and 5th graders) and had been reported MANY times, was only let go when once of her students committed suicide leaving a note talking about how bad things were at school and how no one helped her. Her parents basically ignored the problem, which is fairly common amoung uneducated Latins, and even more so with illegals, whatever the teacher says is right. Couldn´t deal with it anymore. But, yes, for the most part the students were lovely.
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BadBeagleBad



Joined: 23 Aug 2010
Posts: 1186
Location: 24.18105,-103.25185

PostPosted: Sun Aug 16, 2015 11:54 pm    Post subject: Re: U.S. schools scurry to hire P.S. Teachers Reply with quote

Ixchel wrote:
i

I've been following the trends for 43 years and it's up and down. Doesn't matter if you have a doctorate, you still have to pass the tests and do the coursework, it takes some time and money. Also very few pure ESL classes anymore. Most districts require regular Ed teachers who have an ESL endorsement and students attend regular ed classes. Not all but most particularly in districts with lots of non- native speakers.


Not to mention that even if formerly certified, if you leave for more than a few years, you pretty much have to go back to school for a year to get recertified, or get a sub cert, which can work out OK, because if you want they will use you for long term sub jobs, and after a certain period of time you get benefits too.
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esl_prof



Joined: 30 Nov 2013
Posts: 2006
Location: peyi kote solèy frèt

PostPosted: Mon Aug 17, 2015 5:02 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

JN wrote:
I will just have to think about everything, do some research and see what viable opportunities there are in the U.S. for me.


As you continue your research, you may want to explore the possibility of obtaining teacher certification in Florida, which has the quickest and easiest certification program in the U.S. and, by the way, looks like it can be done online before you come back home.

https://www.teacherready.org/

Should you not be interested in teaching in Florida, you'd have to check with the DOE of the states you're interested in to see if they'd accept this particular certification under their reciprocity agreements or, alternatively, with a minimum of additional courses and testing.
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JN



Joined: 17 Jan 2008
Posts: 214

PostPosted: Tue Aug 18, 2015 8:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for reminding me about TeacherReady. The program does sound good, though I'm not sure how I'd do the student teaching, as I'd prefer to do it in the U.S. since that is where I'd be planning to teach.
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esl_prof



Joined: 30 Nov 2013
Posts: 2006
Location: peyi kote solèy frèt

PostPosted: Tue Aug 18, 2015 4:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

JN wrote:
Thanks for reminding me about TeacherReady. The program does sound good, though I'm not sure how I'd do the student teaching, as I'd prefer to do it in the U.S. since that is where I'd be planning to teach.


I'd just e-mail them an inquiry. If it's a worthwhile program, they should be able to get back to you quickly with a list of basic options. Perhaps you could do the student teaching in the state where you hope to obtain reciprocity.
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