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70 Courses Per Term? Doable

 
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esl_prof



Joined: 30 Nov 2013
Posts: 2006
Location: peyi kote solèy frèt

PostPosted: Fri Aug 14, 2015 6:27 pm    Post subject: 70 Courses Per Term? Doable Reply with quote

How many courses would an adjunct college instructor need to teach in a year to earn as much as a university president? Or as much as a tenure-track faculty member?

http://chronicle.com/forums/index.php/topic,154841.0.html
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spanglish



Joined: 21 May 2009
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Location: working on that

PostPosted: Fri Aug 14, 2015 8:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yet another discussion/data point that points to the desperate need to rewrite the social contract, as resources are squeezed more and more tightly into the .1%. Unfortunately, experts seem to be concluding that society is reverting to its norm of extreme inequality. Given that it took a depression and a world war to reorganize society sufficiently to produce 30 years of relative equality and economic growth...prospects for rewriting that social contract do not seem positive.
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esl_prof



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PostPosted: Sat Aug 15, 2015 3:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

spanglish wrote:
Yet another discussion/data point that points to the desperate need to rewrite the social contract, as resources are squeezed more and more tightly into the .1%. Unfortunately, experts seem to be concluding that society is reverting to its norm of extreme inequality. Given that it took a depression and a world war to reorganize society sufficiently to produce 30 years of relative equality and economic growth...prospects for rewriting that social contract do not seem positive.


No, they certainly do not. In fact, some commentators have suggested that it's only a matter of time before parents get smart and figure out that it's not worth investing six-figures into their kids' college education only to have them come home, live in their childhood bedrooms, and try to pay off the crushing debt while working a minimum wage job. When that happens, the higher education bubble will burst (just like the housing bubble and the dot com bubble burst in previous years) and college education will be exposed for the scam it has become. Not looking forward to that day . . .


Last edited by esl_prof on Sat Aug 15, 2015 5:48 pm; edited 1 time in total
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spanglish



Joined: 21 May 2009
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Location: working on that

PostPosted: Sat Aug 15, 2015 6:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

esl_prof wrote:
spanglish wrote:
Yet another discussion/data point that points to the desperate need to rewrite the social contract, as resources are squeezed more and more tightly into the .1%. Unfortunately, experts seem to be concluding that society is reverting to its norm of extreme inequality. Given that it took a depression and a world war to reorganize society sufficiently to produce 30 years of relative equality and economic growth...prospects for rewriting that social contract do not seem positive.


No, they certainly do not. In fact, some commentators have suggested that it's only a matter of time before parents get smart and figure out that it's not worth investing six-grand into their kids' college education only to have them come home, live in their childhood bedrooms, and try to pay off the crushing debt while working a minimum wage job. When that happens, the higher education bubble will burst (just like the housing bubble and the dot com bubble burst in previous years) and college education will be exposed for the scam it has become. Not looking forward to that day . . .


Ya, for individuals - roughly speaking - this is what comes down to at the undergraduate level if one aspires to the American Dream through education:

If you study engineering (not civil), go to a top 100 school and you should be okay.
If you study finance/economics/business, go to a top 30 school and you should be okay.
Go to Princeton/Harvard/Yale/Stanford and study anything and you should be okay.

The rest of us will be fighting for the leftovers. It's tough to make it in America!
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Xie Lin



Joined: 21 Oct 2011
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PostPosted: Sat Aug 15, 2015 2:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

esl_prof wrote:


No, they certainly do not. In fact, some commentators have suggested that it's only a matter of time before parents get smart and figure out that it's not worth investing six-grand into their kids' college education only to have them come home, live in their childhood bedrooms, . . .


"Six grand" ? More like 40 plus grand a year for four years! The freshman college student in my extended family is looking at almost 30,000 a year after all expenses are in--and that's in the state university system. Some of the less affluent students here are opting for the first two years at a commnity college with the goal of transferring to a decent school for the last two. While that has always been the case, it's now become the only option for a rapidly increasing number of students.

.
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esl_prof



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PostPosted: Sat Aug 15, 2015 5:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Xie Lin wrote:
"Six grand" ? More like 40 plus grand a year for four years! The freshman college student in my extended family is looking at almost 30,000 a year after all expenses are in--and that's in the state university system. Some of the less affluent students here are opting for the first two years at a commnity college with the goal of transferring to a decent school for the last two. While that has always been the case, it's now become the only option for a rapidly increasing number of students.


You're math is spot on, Xie Lin. I meant six-figures, not six-grand and have made the correction in the original post. Thanks for pointing out my error.
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Xie Lin



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PostPosted: Sat Aug 15, 2015 6:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

esl_prof wrote:
Xie Lin wrote:
"Six grand" ? More like 40 plus grand a year for four years! The freshman college student in my extended family is looking at almost 30,000 a year after all expenses are in--and that's in the state university system. Some of the less affluent students here are opting for the first two years at a commnity college with the goal of transferring to a decent school for the last two. While that has always been the case, it's now become the only option for a rapidly increasing number of students.


You're math is spot on, Xie Lin. I meant six-figures, not six-grand and have made the correction in the original post. Thanks for pointing out my error.


Ah, I should have assumed it was a slip of the pen--er, keyboard! If only it actually were six grand, the future would be a lot more promising for so many young people.

.
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esl_prof



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PostPosted: Sat Aug 15, 2015 7:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Xie Lin wrote:
Ah, I should have assumed it was a slip of the pen--er, keyboard! If only it actually were six grand, the future would be a lot more promising for so many young people.


My undergraduate education, back in the in the 1980s, only cost about 5k per year--tuition, fees, books, room and board--most of which I paid in cash from minimum wage jobs worked during the school year and summer break. With a little bit of extra help from my parents, I was able to graduate debt free. I'm pretty sure nobody does that anymore. Not unless, of course, they live at home with their parents and go to community college. But otherwise, it's just not doable.
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peripatetic_soul



Joined: 20 Oct 2013
Posts: 296

PostPosted: Sun Aug 16, 2015 5:25 pm    Post subject: 70 courses per term? doable? Reply with quote

You would laugh if I told you my tuition back in the early 70s! It was affordable to apply to out-of-state institutions. In addition, students seemed to receive more financial aid (scholarships, state-funded tuition remission, Perkins grants) that didn't put one in debt. There also seemed to be more jobs available, and I don't mean flipping burgers or working retail at minimum wage.

As for adjuncts and doable hours, they are limited by the ACA regs so that, e.g., at our local college, we cannot teach more than 2 courses (12 cr.) per fall and spring and no more than one course (6 cr.) in the summer which yields about an average gross annual income of $25k, assuming, of course, there is sufficient enrollment for the courses you have been assigned (after having spent hours on syllabus and schedule of assignments).

I don't know how this generation can afford to pursue their dream (unless they anticipate a lucrative career in engineering, medicine, law, or an MBA). My mother said only the upper middle class could afford college in her day, and it seems the pendulum is swinging in that direction again.

Ah, the golden years......... Sorry if I've digressed on this thread, esl_prof.

PS
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esl_prof



Joined: 30 Nov 2013
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PostPosted: Mon Aug 17, 2015 4:31 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

PS,

I just checked the tuition for my alma mater and it's increased seven-fold since my freshman year back in the 1980s. Ironically, my annual salary is approximately the same dollar amount that my father earned as a public school teacher when he was my age back when I went off to college. So, if I were putting a child through college (which, fortunately, I'm not), the likelihood that I'd be able to do so without incurring serious debt or insisting that the child live at home and go to Cheap City College would be quite slim.

You're right about the pendulum swinging back again. Access to college education in the U.S. increased significantly beginning in the post-WWII era due to (1) the economic necessity for more college-trained workers to fill white collar jobs and (2) the GI Bill, which made it possible for returning soldiers to be trained to fill those white collar jobs. Today, as white collar jobs are being outsourced to other parts of the world, the economic need for college-educated workers has significantly declined, and the changes that we are discussing are simply the result of higher education contracting to accommodate the new economic order, the full force of which will be felt when the higher education bubble eventually bursts.
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