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New retirement age 65 years in UAE
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ghost



Joined: 30 Jan 2003
Posts: 1665
Location: Saudi Arabia

PostPosted: Tue Sep 08, 2015 2:03 am    Post subject: New retirement age 65 years in UAE Reply with quote

The new retirement age of 65 years...(previous was 60 years) has been approved by the UAE Government.

Would it be realistic now for people in the 59 - 61 years age bracket to apply for teaching jobs in UAE?

I have one year left of contract in China, but considering my next move.

Thank you.

Ghost in China
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veiledsentiments



Joined: 20 Feb 2003
Posts: 17498
Location: USA

PostPosted: Tue Sep 08, 2015 1:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

We won't know the answer to that until someone tries it and actually gets hired.

VS
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nomad soul



Joined: 31 Jan 2010
Posts: 10829
Location: The real world

PostPosted: Tue Sep 08, 2015 2:34 pm    Post subject: Re: New retirement age 65 years in UAE Reply with quote

ghost wrote:
The new retirement age of 65 years...(previous was 60 years) has been approved by the UAE Government.

It's not new; the retirement age of 65 went into law more than four years ago:

"UPDATE: Retirement age in UAE raised from 60 to 65 in labour law changes"
By Karen Leigh, Arabian Business | 30 December 2010
Source: http://www.arabianbusiness.com/update-retirement-age-in-uae-raised-from-60-65-in-labour-law-changes-370402.html

The UAE has raised its retirement from 60 to 65, giving expatriates leave to work for a further five years, a Ministry of Labour official said on Thursday.

The move, which forms part of a widespread change in labour laws across the country, will allow expats to secure work visas up to the age of 65. “The retirement age before was 60, now it’s 65. They raised the retirement age,” the official, who declined to be named, told Arabian Business. He said the Ministry would start accepting requests from January 1 (2011) to issue the over-60 permits. He said the same fees would apply as to permits for workers 60-and-under. “We believe that these people still can stay and deliver more work – they have the experience – and we want them to stay. After 65 you’re considered post-retirement, and it’s a different rate,” he said. “You’re also on a one-year visa [term] instead of a two-year.” He said the move would help free up the country’s labour market. “We don’t want it to be rigid,” he said.

It is the latest in a series of work visa changes affecting the UAE’s expat population, including an announcement last week that as of January 1 (2011), labour card validity will be reduced from three years to two years. Skilled expat workers will also no longer need a no-objection certificate from former employers to take up a new job.

Under previous labour laws, employers can refuse to issue a certificate of no-objection, resulting in expatriate workers having to leave the country for six months. The official said the Ministry’s changes were meant to keep expat workers from leaving Dubai and to “empower” the labour market. “The government believes that it should maintain this asset [experienced workers] in the country and seeks to build a transparent relationship between employer and employee,” he said. By keeping job competition in town, the ruling could have a direct effect on Emiritisation, he said. “The labour market will be done by supply and demand rule,” he said. “It will raise the salary levels – and Emiratis will start wanting the jobs. More decrees are coming, to maintain a healthy relationship between employers and employees.”

(End of article)
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nwtefl



Joined: 20 May 2015
Posts: 146
Location: England

PostPosted: Wed Sep 09, 2015 12:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

If someone in that older age bracket gets a job it will give us all hope ! Fingers crossed !
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veiledsentiments



Joined: 20 Feb 2003
Posts: 17498
Location: USA

PostPosted: Wed Sep 09, 2015 2:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I would say that anyone that is hired over 55-58 would be someone with direct related experience with Arabic speakers... preferably in the Gulf... on their CV. That has pretty much always been true.

VS
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dustdevil



Joined: 27 Mar 2014
Posts: 38
Location: Retired in U.S.

PostPosted: Sun Sep 27, 2015 9:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Different country, but probably the same idea: In Saudi you still generally can't get a work permit beyond 60. I got mine at 59 and stayed six years. I could have stayed longer, as a couple of colleagues are about two years older than I am.
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nomad soul



Joined: 31 Jan 2010
Posts: 10829
Location: The real world

PostPosted: Sat Jul 30, 2016 7:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

On a related note...

Expatriates want to see out their days in the UAE
By Jennifer Bell, The National | July 30, 2016
Source: http://www.thenational.ae/uae/expatriates-want-to-see-out-their-days-in-the-uae

ABU DHABI // Expatriates are seeking changes to let them live out their days in the UAE, and believe the Government should review their retirement age. Many who have spent most of their working lives in the country dream of retiring here. They would like to see restrictions eased to allow expats, who make up about 85 per cent of the population, to obtain a residency visa after turning 65.

Abu Dhabi resident Liz Beneski said she would be thrilled to stay after she finished working. "I will be shattered if they don’t change the rules," said Ms Beneski, 48, an American. "My clock is ticking and I moved here to stay for life. I carefully chose my life in the UAE for many reasons but mainly because the growing healthcare sector, tourism attractions and modernity of design."

The marketing and communications director for the Beach Rotana Abu Dhabi would also like expat workers to be given the freedom to work for longer. The retirement age for expats is 60 years, although the Ministry of Labour accepts requests for work permits for people over that age, up to 65. The retirement age for Emiratis is 49. "I wish the Government would reconsider its age limits on employment," said Ms Beneski. "It would be my dream to be able to work until mid or late 60s, then retire and remain welcome."

Al Ghadeer resident Anita Nasr agreed. "It’s early yet for me to start worrying about retirement but after 17 years in the UAE as a hard-working, law-abiding resident, it would be nice to know I didn’t have to leave the minute I stopped working," she said. "Like many Lebanese, my long-term plans have to include a Plan B in case the situation there deteriorates further. Knowing there’s an option close to home would be a great relief."

Sarah Flowerday said life after retirement was a constant concern. "I want to stay and this is something that worries me a lot," said the Brit, the global vice president of a manufacturing company. "I’ve been here nine years now and have 20 left before I retire, and I honestly want this to change for us. I hope I don’t have to leave and I hope I’ll be here for the next 20 years until I do retire."

After 41 years in the country, Manzer Qayyum wanted to consider the UAE a home for life. "More than a want for me, it is a need to retire here," said Mr Qayyum, 55. "I am from Pakistan and my wife is Indian. This is the place we got married and both our sons are working here. We have all our friends here and it is going to be very difficult to adjust if we ever go back. If the government here can make the visa rule easy for people who have lived here for decades and help with medical care, this would be the ideal place for us to retire."

Purvi Gokani Rupareliya, 37, owner of the Beautiful Henna Centre in Abu Dhabi, said she would also like to stay longer if the rules of residency and retirement were easier. Pakistani financial controller A M, 26, hoped the rules would change. "It should be the same like in the West or in Europe," he said. "If you spend five years or so you get permanent residence or nationality. Here you don’t get either. At a minimum, permanent residence should be there for those who spend more than 10 years here."

(End of article)
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danshengou



Joined: 17 Feb 2016
Posts: 434
Location: A bizarre overcrowded hole

PostPosted: Sat Jul 30, 2016 10:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Definitely something to keep in mind before building a career there. Do they have an investment residency option? I am pretty sure Bahrain does. Otherwise, be ready to move somewhere when that day comes.
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veiledsentiments



Joined: 20 Feb 2003
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PostPosted: Sat Jul 30, 2016 10:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

No they don't. Even if you buy their high priced real estate, it doesn't include a residence visa. That is the main reason that I have always advised against investing there. A number of teachers bought flats at the higher end of the real estate market, then lost their jobs... and their investment in the flat because they had to leave and couldn't unload the flat.

VS
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rdobbs98



Joined: 08 Oct 2010
Posts: 236

PostPosted: Sun Aug 21, 2016 9:09 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

My boss, principal, is 68 and still here!
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danshengou



Joined: 17 Feb 2016
Posts: 434
Location: A bizarre overcrowded hole

PostPosted: Sun Aug 21, 2016 11:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

veiledsentiments wrote:
No they don't. Even if you buy their high priced real estate, it doesn't include a residence visa. That is the main reason that I have always advised against investing there. A number of teachers bought flats at the higher end of the real estate market, then lost their jobs... and their investment in the flat because they had to leave and couldn't unload the flat.

VS



Why would someone lose their investment just because they no longer resided in the UAE? One could just buy a place there and use it as a vacation home, or rent it out, etc.
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veiledsentiments



Joined: 20 Feb 2003
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PostPosted: Sun Aug 21, 2016 2:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

danshengou wrote:
Why would someone lose their investment just because they no longer resided in the UAE? One could just buy a place there and use it as a vacation home, or rent it out, etc.

Number one... the vast majority of EFL teachers can't afford to take vacations in the UAE once they leave the Gulf. Number two... it provides no visa, so at any time your right to enter the country could be withdrawn. Number three... having a rental in a country like this is not so simple. Most teachers couldn't afford in the first place to buy a unit that would be a good rental to vacationers... and the rental market in the UAE is completely unrealistic and run by government situations that you haven't a clue of understanding or breaking into. The UAE is currently WAY overbuilt in rental flats, and completely unreliable as to keeping a unit rented.

There were a number of teachers who bought at the top of the market and when they were "not renewed" a few years later, they were unable to sell for even a fraction of what they owed. Thus they had to walk away and just lost their investment. And then their unpaid debts meant that they couldn't get another job there.

Investing in real estate in a foreign country requires an intelligent informed buyer. Tellingly, there have been no posters telling about how they or their friend made money in the UAE real estate market... only a few tales of woe.

VS
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danshengou



Joined: 17 Feb 2016
Posts: 434
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PostPosted: Sun Aug 21, 2016 5:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

However that may be, it does not change the fact that residency is not required to buy a home in the UAE. That said, if you feel doing so is too risky, then put your money elsewhere.

Unfortunately, that still doesn't change the fact that many teachers lost their hides. But the lesson is don't buy something you probably can't afford, and always plan for the worst (e.g., you lose your job, can no longer work, etc.). In my view TEFLers should probably stick with low-risk liquid investments for when that rainy day comes.
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Joined: 20 Feb 2003
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PostPosted: Mon Aug 22, 2016 1:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

danshengou wrote:
In my view TEFLers should probably stick with low-risk liquid investments for when that rainy day comes.

Exactly...

VS
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Gulezar



Joined: 19 Jun 2007
Posts: 441

PostPosted: Fri Aug 26, 2016 8:44 am    Post subject: Back to 65 Reply with quote

Back on the 65 age limit ... I've heard that once you're over 60, you have to do an annual visa renewal. This is a hassle for the employee and employer, so they tend to look for new hires that would statistically have fewer health issues and cost less for a visa renewal; once every three years, not every year.

Special skills and a longstanding track record of success in the region might make it happen, but I would say the 55 and older folks are not in the top bracket for consideration.
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