Site Search:
 
Get TEFL Certified & Start Your Adventure Today!
Teach English Abroad and Get Paid to see the World!
Job Discussion Forums Forum Index Job Discussion Forums
"The Internet's Meeting Place for ESL/EFL Students and Teachers from Around the World!"
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

Oman's severe shortage of teachers
Goto page 1, 2  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Job Discussion Forums Forum Index -> Oman
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
nomad soul



Joined: 31 Jan 2010
Posts: 11371
Location: The real world

PostPosted: Sat Jul 16, 2016 12:48 am    Post subject: Oman's severe shortage of teachers Reply with quote

Oman grapples with severe shortage in number of teachers
By Tariq Ziad Al Haremi, Times of Oman | July 15, 2016
Source: http://timesofoman.com/article/88003/Oman/Education/Oman-grapples-with-severe-shortage-in-number-of-teachers:-Ministry-of-Education

MUSCAT: A shortage of teachers in the Sultanate is a cause for concern as there is roughly only one teacher for every 100 students, according to Ministry of Education’s statistics. Last month, the Shura Council held a meeting with the Minister of Education, Madiha Al Shaibani, where a member expressed his concern over the ‘excessive’ number of students in one class in a government school, which had 30 students per class.

The rapid increase of students and a high birth rate has triggered demand for more teachers to be hired in the education sector. According to Alpen Capital’s Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) Education Sector Report 2016, it is forecast that there will be 1,115,486 students by 2020. In general, there will be a 3.6 per cent increase in the number of students in the GCC by 2020, which will jump from 12.6 million to 15 million. In terms of annualised growth during 2015 to 2020, the number of students in Oman, Qatar, and the United Arab Emirates (UAE) are projected to grow faster than the other member nations,” read the report.

However, in Oman (and the GCC), with the increased number of students and lack of schools, it is equally difficult to hire qualified teachers, especially nationals in private and international schools. “The shortage of teachers in the region is the second highest in the world due to an overall dearth of teachers globally, coupled with a low pool of nationals inclined towards pursuing teaching as a profession in the GCC,” the report emphasised. “Moreover, the dependence on expatriates, who are transient by nature, is further challenging this availability,” it added. The increase in the number of students would mean an increase in schools, as well as the need for more teachers in the Sultanate.

International and private schools are also gaining popularity among parents as more opt to send their children to these schools, considering its bilingual curriculum and high quality of education; and as students increase, more schools will be needed.

“Omani families continue to seek an education for their children, which will leave them bilingual and with an understanding of the international business culture, and the coping skills necessary to succeed in the global arena,” said Danny Harrison, chief executive officer of Al Omania Education Services. “The market needs are diverse, and whilst the number of bilingual international school models are growing and attracting investment, there is also expansion in the purely foreign curriculum schools. Consequently, there is a lot of jostling for market share and the schools that consistently deliver quality education will enjoy long term fruits. On the flip side, the region has seen the demise of a number of operators, who over-promise and under-deliver with catastrophic consequences,” he added.

(End of article)
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
CVN-76



Joined: 28 Mar 2014
Posts: 171

PostPosted: Tue Nov 08, 2016 12:31 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The administrators and students should have been treating the native-speaking English teachers a lot better the past 20 years instead of taking them for granted and mistreating them. The slow dearth is because of teachers refusal to put up with the conditions in the ME. Not honoring teacher contracts, not listening to teachers about unruly students, and just plain ripping off teachers are all coming back to bite these whining schools in the rear end now. It's called Karma.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Lord T



Joined: 07 Jul 2015
Posts: 285

PostPosted: Tue Nov 08, 2016 1:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

An ex-colleague has just 'walked' from a job at Nizwa CAS, after just 3 weeks.

He said it simply isn't worth putting yourself through the b/s for such a small salary.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
madrileno



Joined: 19 Aug 2010
Posts: 264
Location: Salalah, Oman

PostPosted: Tue Nov 08, 2016 12:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Combined with the hiring/salary freezes at many colleges and ministries as a result of the oil crisis, this is going to be a perfect storm.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
nomad soul



Joined: 31 Jan 2010
Posts: 11371
Location: The real world

PostPosted: Tue Nov 08, 2016 4:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The article is about the increasing number of national and expat children at the k-12 levels. EFL teachers at the tertiary level represent a tiny drop in the bucket in terms of teachers across all disciplines and levels.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Tazz



Joined: 26 Sep 2013
Posts: 512
Location: Jakarta

PostPosted: Tue Nov 08, 2016 4:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The salary was never a problem for me, it was the utter tedium of staying in an Omani interior town combined with the difficulty faced in attempting to communicate with a 'mixed' gender class of 18-19 year olds who typically didn't want to be there, [the males] or didn't want to be in a classroom with the males, [the females]. The brainless futility of working in this hell eventually persuaded me to leave, after 3 years. Many native speakers came and went during the time I was there..... Shocked
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
EFL Educator



Joined: 17 Jul 2013
Posts: 969
Location: Cape Town

PostPosted: Thu Nov 10, 2016 12:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I do remember the Ibri College of Technology always had a shortage of native English teachers when I was there...me thinks it was due to the Indians and Arabs that ran the place who preferred non-native speakers,,,,,as well as the strange species of EFL teacher that hanged out at the Ibri Hotel Waterhole who scared them away!!! Evil or Very Mad
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Lord T



Joined: 07 Jul 2015
Posts: 285

PostPosted: Thu Nov 10, 2016 3:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

EFL Educator wrote:
I do remember the Ibri College of Technology always had a shortage of native English teachers when I was there...me thinks it was due to the Indians and Arabs that ran the place who preferred non-native speakers


Yes, I think this may be the case at Nizwa CAS and Nizwa CoT - perhaps the non-native speakers feel more insecure and are therefore easier to push around.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Tazz



Joined: 26 Sep 2013
Posts: 512
Location: Jakarta

PostPosted: Thu Nov 10, 2016 9:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

'teachers that hanged out'......god help the students back then! Shocked
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
AmericanAmina



Joined: 15 Dec 2015
Posts: 104
Location: Abu Dhabi, UAE

PostPosted: Sat Nov 12, 2016 9:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm an American living in the UAE right now but looking to move next fall. I want to find a university teaching job preferably, foundation year or otherwise. I have a BA in English, and my MA in TESOL will be complete by spring, and I have some teaching experience but not at the university level.

I'm curious about life in Oman and what my teaching prospects there would be. What's the word on the streets? Are the universities hiring? Or just complaining about a lack of teachers...?

I don't mind living in small towns. I usually prefer it actually. I've heard the climate is greener and cooler in Salalah, which sounds pretty appealing to me.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
Tazz



Joined: 26 Sep 2013
Posts: 512
Location: Jakarta

PostPosted: Sat Nov 12, 2016 9:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

You can get hired by a recruiting company-globnet, TATI, etc....but they are very strict regarding the 2 year College/ Uni experience rule.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
AmericanAmina



Joined: 15 Dec 2015
Posts: 104
Location: Abu Dhabi, UAE

PostPosted: Sat Nov 12, 2016 10:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks Tazz. That's the same as here in UAE, except here it's 5 years experience... unless you have connections, then there's no experience required. Wink
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
balancedsentiments



Joined: 03 Jul 2012
Posts: 31

PostPosted: Mon Nov 14, 2016 3:16 pm    Post subject: Reality check Reply with quote

Following on from Nomad Soul's comment, before everyone gets carried away, please note that this is from the Ministry of Education, so it's about schools, NOT colleges or universities.

The colleges that are now CASs were originally teacher-training colleges at a time when there was a big push to get Omani teachers into the school system. A lot of the early graduates were rushed through to Diploma (foundation+2years) or Higher Diploma (foundation+3 years) level, as happened during the baby boom in lots of Western countries. A high degree of Omanisaton was reached, and most of the colleges were converted to CASs, with only Rustaq and SQU left, offering full B Ed programs.

The plan assumed that most teachers would stay in the system, but the attrition rate has been higher than expected, hence the shortfall. Watch this space.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
MuscatGary



Joined: 03 Jun 2013
Posts: 1364
Location: Flying around the ME...

PostPosted: Tue Nov 15, 2016 1:31 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Note that Masters degrees are not recognised by the Ministry for salary purposes unless you have at least two years verifiable post-Masters experience. A newly minted Masters may get you the job but it won't get the extra dosh.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
AmericanAmina



Joined: 15 Dec 2015
Posts: 104
Location: Abu Dhabi, UAE

PostPosted: Tue Nov 15, 2016 8:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

MuscatGary wrote:
Note that Masters degrees are not recognised by the Ministry for salary purposes unless you have at least two years verifiable post-Masters experience. A newly minted Masters may get you the job but it won't get the extra dosh.


If it helps me get my foot in the door, I think I'm ok with that.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Job Discussion Forums Forum Index -> Oman All times are GMT
Goto page 1, 2  Next
Page 1 of 2

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


This page is maintained by the one and only Dave Sperling.
Contact Dave's ESL Cafe
Copyright © 2018 Dave Sperling. All Rights Reserved.

Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2002 phpBB Group

Teaching Jobs in China
Teaching Jobs in China