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Having Job ahead narrow options?
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rupert shellgame



Joined: 11 Apr 2007
Posts: 109

PostPosted: Tue Dec 27, 2016 3:29 pm    Post subject: Having Job ahead narrow options? Reply with quote

If I accept a job before arrivng, get there, find it's bad or there's something better, how easy is it to change? Would it be better to come over with the job already or to come over and spend some time looking around?

Thank you
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spiral78



Joined: 05 Apr 2004
Posts: 11489
Location: On a Short Leash

PostPosted: Tue Dec 27, 2016 8:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

And you're from where? And have what qualifications? And you're going to get a visa to enter Russia how, other than through an employer?
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rupert shellgame



Joined: 11 Apr 2007
Posts: 109

PostPosted: Wed Dec 28, 2016 4:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm from the U.S., I've been teaching English in Taiwan for ten years, I've taught university and high school Russian in the U.S. 15 years ago. I don't know about the visa.
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spiral78



Joined: 05 Apr 2004
Posts: 11489
Location: On a Short Leash

PostPosted: Wed Dec 28, 2016 4:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The US citizenship may in future be a plus, if the warm relationships promised by national leaders actually develop. Meanwhile, you need a visa to go to Russia, and it's not simple to score one of these. I suggest you inquire at your nearest Russian embassy; you might also ask if a tourist visa can be converted to a work visa if you find a job (I suspect it would be complicated, but I've always had only work visas, so don't know personally).

You would also be well-served to start applying to schools, though it's not peak hiring period. See if you get any bites; the job market isn't by any means desperate for native speakers, even those with stronger quals.

No CELTA or equivalent cert? That's a drawback.

Your 10 years in Taiwan isn't likely to hold much water as Russian students are a very different kettle of fish to those in Asia, and most employers are keenly aware of this.

Your (presumed) Russian language skills will help.


Last edited by spiral78 on Wed Dec 28, 2016 5:01 pm; edited 1 time in total
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GF



Joined: 08 Jun 2003
Posts: 238
Location: Tallinn

PostPosted: Wed Dec 28, 2016 5:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

rupert shellgame wrote:
I don't know about the visa.


That's the first thing you need to sort out before going or you will be in danger of all sorts of problems. Find a school that will arrange for a real work visa. Otherwise, you will be working illegally and be subject to sudden deportation.
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rupert shellgame



Joined: 11 Apr 2007
Posts: 109

PostPosted: Wed Dec 28, 2016 5:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I do not require income asap, but eventually will. I'm willing to take a job, however, if that's the easiest or only way to get a visa. What I'm asking is: how hard is it to change a job sponsoring your visa if you don't like it?
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spiral78



Joined: 05 Apr 2004
Posts: 11489
Location: On a Short Leash

PostPosted: Wed Dec 28, 2016 5:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

That's a question for the embassy, and possibly for a potential employer. It's not that common just to change a visa mid-stream in Russia - as GF notes, it's a place to be sure your legal ducks are in a row at all times.

You are unlikely to get many replies here from people who've done it, outside of those few who have Russian family and long-term relations, and who thus have different types of legal status than you would as a newcomer.
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rupert shellgame



Joined: 11 Apr 2007
Posts: 109

PostPosted: Wed Dec 28, 2016 5:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well I'm fine with coming over with a job, I don't mind working, I'm just curious what happens if the job is absolute hell. If you find a new job can you change sponsorship?

I've lived in Russia before, speak it fluently, have a lot of friends there, and am no stranger to adveristy or hard work. I really wanna go back and try it out bu obviously it's a different place now. My wife would be going with. She doesn't have the Russian but is working on it.
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spiral78



Joined: 05 Apr 2004
Posts: 11489
Location: On a Short Leash

PostPosted: Wed Dec 28, 2016 6:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
If you find a new job can you change sponsorship?


There is really no one solid answer. Totally depends on both employers.

Bringing a wife? You're unlikely to make enough money as a teacher to support her- if you've got other income, could make it work.
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GF



Joined: 08 Jun 2003
Posts: 238
Location: Tallinn

PostPosted: Wed Dec 28, 2016 7:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

This isn't a good time to go with a spouse who isn't also generating an income unless your connections can put you up or provide you a low-rent flat. The plum jobs are far and few between and don't usually go to newbies to the country.
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stuckinusa



Joined: 23 Dec 2015
Posts: 21

PostPosted: Wed Jan 04, 2017 7:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

OP,
I feel that Spiral has been somewhat misinformed about how difficult it is for Americans to get a Russian visa. In reality, the process for Americans to get a Russian visa was simplified a few years ago due to a treaty between the U.S and Russia. Americans can now get visas to Russia that are good for 3 years and I "believe" Americans can stay in Russia for up to 6 months at a time on that visa, but you'll have to do a double check on that. So no, it is not hard to get a Russian visa. Its just a matter of some red tape and money.
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stuckinusa



Joined: 23 Dec 2015
Posts: 21

PostPosted: Wed Jan 04, 2017 7:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

If you want to go to Russia to look for a job you should get a tourist or business visa to enter the country. Once you secure a job, you may have to leave the country until they get your work permit sorted out. Once that is sorted out, you can re-enter the country and start working.
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spiral78



Joined: 05 Apr 2004
Posts: 11489
Location: On a Short Leash

PostPosted: Wed Jan 04, 2017 7:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
I feel that Spiral has been somewhat misinformed about how difficult it is for Americans to get a Russian visa. In reality, the process for Americans to get a Russian visa was simplified a few years ago due to a treaty between the U.S and Russia. Americans can now get visas to Russia that are good for 3 years and I "believe" Americans can stay in Russia for up to 6 months at a time on that visa, but you'll have to do a double check on that. So no, it is not hard to get a Russian visa. Its just a matter of some red tape and money.


Ahem. My latest Russian work visa finished just three months ago, and my next one is coming up in April 2017. Rolling Eyes
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stuckinusa



Joined: 23 Dec 2015
Posts: 21

PostPosted: Wed Jan 11, 2017 10:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

spiral78 wrote:
Quote:
I feel that Spiral has been somewhat misinformed about how difficult it is for Americans to get a Russian visa. In reality, the process for Americans to get a Russian visa was simplified a few years ago due to a treaty between the U.S and Russia. Americans can now get visas to Russia that are good for 3 years and I "believe" Americans can stay in Russia for up to 6 months at a time on that visa, but you'll have to do a double check on that. So no, it is not hard to get a Russian visa. Its just a matter of some red tape and money.


Ahem. My latest Russian work visa finished just three months ago, and my next one is coming up in April 2017. Rolling Eyes

My apologies, but in my defense your post seemed to imply that you were not American and only commenting about what you've heard about the process of American getting Visas. I've done a great deal of research on it as I want to teach there when I get out of school and everything I've found seems to indicate it is a relatively straightforward process to get a tourist or business visa. I've read that it can be a pain to get a work visa, but most of the jobs listings on this site say they provide full work visa support. Obviously, it wouldn't be worth getting a job with a school that did not provide that.
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spiral78



Joined: 05 Apr 2004
Posts: 11489
Location: On a Short Leash

PostPosted: Thu Jan 12, 2017 7:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
everything I've found seems to indicate it is a relatively straightforward process to get a tourist or business visa.


As you cannot teach on either of these legally, the 'straightforward' option doesn't really apply. Yes, schools can get you a visa, if they want you enough to do so. The OP may find this a bit more problematic with a trailing spouse.
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