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Some questions about teaching in Mexico
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BadBeagleBad



Joined: 23 Aug 2010
Posts: 1178
Location: 24.18105,-103.25185

PostPosted: Fri May 12, 2017 5:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

lovelatinamerica wrote:
Hello, I am back. Thank you for all your insight and advice.

How has learning Spanish been for any of you teachers? I know in the classroom English is the main language obviously. Have you been able to practice a lot outside the classroom? I want to avoid hanging out with English speakers as much as possible and really try to immerse myself.


If you don't live around expats, you will be practicing all the time! Just live your day to day life, go to the store, the bank, etc. Ask people questions. Even ask what time it is and start a conversation. Or ask for directions. Become a regular at a few restaurants. Are you in Mexico now? If so, where. I didn't asnwer your other question (about practicing) because it doesn't apply to me, haha, I grew up speaking Spanish, so, yeah, have had a lot of practice.
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MotherF



Joined: 07 Jun 2010
Posts: 1411
Location: 1748'N 9746'W

PostPosted: Fri May 12, 2017 4:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have a degree in Spanish. But I suggest my colleagues join a club or a class or some sort to use Spanish outside of work and make local friends. Otherwise you end up having the same conversations over and over again. I've known people who spoke excellent "market Spanish" but still had no command over grammatical forms used outside of shopping transactions. So take an art class, join Zumba, or a book club. Nearly every town has a "casa de cultura" and a sports center to look for these activities.
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lovelatinamerica



Joined: 12 Dec 2016
Posts: 17
Location: California

PostPosted: Sat May 13, 2017 12:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

BadBeagleBad wrote:
lovelatinamerica wrote:
Hello, I am back. Thank you for all your insight and advice.

How has learning Spanish been for any of you teachers? I know in the classroom English is the main language obviously. Have you been able to practice a lot outside the classroom? I want to avoid hanging out with English speakers as much as possible and really try to immerse myself.


If you don't live around expats, you will be practicing all the time! Just live your day to day life, go to the store, the bank, etc. Ask people questions. Even ask what time it is and start a conversation. Or ask for directions. Become a regular at a few restaurants. Are you in Mexico now? If so, where. I didn't asnwer your other question (about practicing) because it doesn't apply to me, haha, I grew up speaking Spanish, so, yeah, have had a lot of practice.


Thank you. I am actually not teaching in Mexico yet. I plan to be there teaching in January of next year hopefully.
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lovelatinamerica



Joined: 12 Dec 2016
Posts: 17
Location: California

PostPosted: Sat May 13, 2017 12:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

MotherF wrote:
I have a degree in Spanish. But I suggest my colleagues join a club or a class or some sort to use Spanish outside of work and make local friends. Otherwise you end up having the same conversations over and over again. I've known people who spoke excellent "market Spanish" but still had no command over grammatical forms used outside of shopping transactions. So take an art class, join Zumba, or a book club. Nearly every town has a "casa de cultura" and a sports center to look for these activities.


Thank you. That makes a lot of sense.
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lovelatinamerica



Joined: 12 Dec 2016
Posts: 17
Location: California

PostPosted: Sun Jul 09, 2017 9:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hey everyone. When a job posting for an English teaching position in Mexico says "A convenir", what does that typically mean? Like does it depend on my credentials and experience how much I will be paid? Do you think it's possible to suggest a wage and get that wage as long a it isn't ridiculously high? Like I want to be able to make at least 15000 (before taxes). More would be great.
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kimberleygd



Joined: 11 May 2015
Posts: 21

PostPosted: Wed Jul 12, 2017 3:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

lovelatinamerica wrote:
MotherF - Thank you!

BadBeagleBad - What are the names of the Mexico City neighborhoods you are talking about that I should look in? Also, if I don't use craigslist do I use Facebook groups? Do I just cruise around looking for rent signs in these neighborhoods? If you don't want to post the names of the neighborhoods here you can send me a message.

Also, I am not sure how I get side work privately tutoring students. Do I just post an ad on Craigslist? What is the starting rate?

I have heard about the public transit in Guadalajara. Too bad about Monterrey. I thought things were looking better there.

I have been to Oaxaca City but I understand that outside of universities there isn't a lot of work in Oaxaca.

Jultime: - I have been looking at that area as well. Thank you!



I found my place on Facebook.Once you decide where you're going just search for rente/vente groups in that area.
I think most places are in traditional Mexican neighborhoods?
Private tutoring jobs are much easier to come by once you're settled in.If you take a teaching job at a school you'll develop contacts.I have had countless offers for tutoring that I've turned down because I am working full time, but once I retire it will give me a nice little extra income.
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kimberleygd



Joined: 11 May 2015
Posts: 21

PostPosted: Wed Jul 12, 2017 3:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

lovelatinamerica wrote:
Hey everyone. When a job posting for an English teaching position in Mexico says "A convenir", what does that typically mean? Like does it depend on my credentials and experience how much I will be paid? Do you think it's possible to suggest a wage and get that wage as long a it isn't ridiculously high? Like I want to be able to make at least 15000 (before taxes). More would be great.



I would apply for jobs that has the salary you would like listed. There should be a few for 15000. I'm not sure how much they haggle here? I honestly didn't try being new tothe situation. Sorry,I've never heard of convenir.
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lovelatinamerica



Joined: 12 Dec 2016
Posts: 17
Location: California

PostPosted: Wed Aug 23, 2017 5:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hello. I have more questions. I am looking at the work visa process. I saw that it can take 3 to 4 months and the site said that I should get an immigration lawyer. Is this true? Seems too complicated and expensive.
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Guy Courchesne



Joined: 10 Mar 2003
Posts: 9623
Location: Guadalajara

PostPosted: Wed Aug 23, 2017 5:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Getting a work visa can be done in as little as 2 to 4 weeks, but it can take longer depending on the employer or often the city or state it's done from in Mexico.

Getting an immigration lawyer is never a bad idea, though the process begins with your employer as they must file a job offer through immigration and have it approved before you can schedule your consulate visit.
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lovelatinamerica



Joined: 12 Dec 2016
Posts: 17
Location: California

PostPosted: Thu Aug 24, 2017 1:07 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Guy Courchesne wrote:
Getting a work visa can be done in as little as 2 to 4 weeks, but it can take longer depending on the employer or often the city or state it's done from in Mexico.

Getting an immigration lawyer is never a bad idea, though the process begins with your employer as they must file a job offer through immigration and have it approved before you can schedule your consulate visit.


Thank you. I posted this question somewhere else and everyone who responded were very negative basically saying it would take months and never going to happen.
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Guy Courchesne



Joined: 10 Mar 2003
Posts: 9623
Location: Guadalajara

PostPosted: Thu Aug 24, 2017 5:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

lovelatinamerica wrote:
Guy Courchesne wrote:
Getting a work visa can be done in as little as 2 to 4 weeks, but it can take longer depending on the employer or often the city or state it's done from in Mexico.

Getting an immigration lawyer is never a bad idea, though the process begins with your employer as they must file a job offer through immigration and have it approved before you can schedule your consulate visit.


Thank you. I posted this question somewhere else and everyone who responded were very negative basically saying it would take months and never going to happen.


Really? That's odd...employer sponsored visas are the easiest and most common route to go, and don't take very long provided the employer is legit. Maybe the wording of your question invited different responses - I see a lot of people asking about getting the visa without an offer of employment which is pretty much impossible unless you start by coming in under a family, refugee, or non-lucrative status (like what retired folks use).
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reddevil79



Joined: 19 Jul 2004
Posts: 232
Location: Neither here nor there

PostPosted: Thu Aug 24, 2017 6:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Guy, this hasn’t been our experience dealing with the immigration offices in Oaxaca City. All our hires have taken at least two months from the point of the employer submitting the paperwork until the candidate has the work visa in hand. With one candidate last year, it took nearly four months, which is just ridiculous, and we’re losing candidates as they get fed up of waiting and accept other job offers in Latin America or further afield.

The new immigration reform has done us no favours whatsoever, and it has made it very difficult to attract good candidates, at least that has been our experience.

How I envy those working with immigration offices who get the visa done in as little as two weeks! Shocked
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Guy Courchesne



Joined: 10 Mar 2003
Posts: 9623
Location: Guadalajara

PostPosted: Thu Aug 24, 2017 9:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I stand corrected on Oaxaca then. My personal experience in sponsoring people is that Mexico City and Monterrey are fast, and Guadalajara not so bad.

I hear Pachuca is slow too...
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