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Schools struggle with costs & attracting good teachers

 
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nomad soul



Joined: 31 Jan 2010
Posts: 11249
Location: The real world

PostPosted: Tue Feb 14, 2017 4:04 am    Post subject: Schools struggle with costs & attracting good teachers Reply with quote

Tough times ahead for UAE schools, education experts warn
By Nadeem Hanif, The National | Feb 13, 2017
Source: http://www.thenational.ae/uae/tough-times-ahead-for-uae-schools-education-experts-warn

DUBAI // Schools face a struggle to survive as operating costs rise, profits drop and global competition for the best teachers becomes even more intense, education experts say.

Another 175,000 school places are expected to be open by 2020, 90 per cent of them in the private sector, exacerbating the problem of oversupply. "We have already seen ‘Closing’ or ‘For Sale’ signs appear on schools that are relatively new to the UAE," said Clive Pierrepont, director of communications at education provider Taaleem. "Existing schools with a good track record and history of positive achievements will already have a solid population, and most will have achieved a critical number of students to make themselves financially viable. What the market is watching closely is how new entrants to the UAE are going to fare when the projections in their business plans fall far short of their targets due to the current reality of a surplus of places, especially in the premium school sector."

A report by the consultants PricewaterhouseCoopers says there is growth in private primary and secondary school enrolments in almost all of the emirates, led by Dubai, and excepting Fujairah.

This will require more investment in good quality teaching. "The quality of a school never exceeds the quality of teachers," Mr Pierrepont said. "The single most important feature in a successful school is a highly talented, motivated and effective staff. There is a worldwide shortage of teachers. We compete in a global market to attract and retain the very best of them, with the right experience, a proven track record and specific skills." Mr Pierrepont said that competitive rates of pay and benefits must be offered to attract the best talent. Taaleem allocated 70 per cent of its expenditure to staffing.

Dubai is predicted to need another 74,500 places in 50 new private schools by 2020, with 62,000 more places in 52 new private schools required in Abu Dhabi, the PwC report said. This rapid growth will challenge sustainability of schools who do not have a long-term plan, Mr Pierrepont said.

Dr Natasha Ridge, executive director of Sheikh Saud bin Saqr Al Qasimi Foundation for Policy Research, agreed that schools would have to pay more to attract good teachers, which would lead to greater costs and higher tuition fees. "Operators could see a reduction in profit margins, so those expecting big returns may be disappointed," Dr Ridge said.

There may be instability in the education market if new schools fail, and regulators should make sure new entrants to the market have strong business plans, Dr Ridge said. She said that oversupply of places could lead to lower fees and overall there will be more choice for parents, but there was an acute shortage of good quality schools below the average annual tuition fee rate of Dh40,000.

Judith Finnemore, of Focal Point Management Consultancy, said cost of living was also a concern. "If the cost of living rises, the teachers who are not paid so much will not come because remittances will decrease," Ms Finnemore said. "Teaching is not such an attractive proposition anywhere any more and you cannot ‘steal’ teachers from western countries indefinitely."

The PwC report, Understanding the GCC Education Sector, Country Profile: UAE Dubai, will see UK and Indian curriculum schools continue to dominate but International Baccalaureate curriculum schools are becoming increasingly popular. In Abu Dhabi, Indian and American curriculum schools are leading growth but British schools remain popular choices. Formal education in pre-kindergarten is being encouraged by the Government, which could mean a significant increase in the number of providers.

The report said that if the UAE hit the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development’s average participation rate of 33 per cent for children aged up to 2 by 2020, more than 81,500 more seats may be needed.

(End of article)
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dragonpiwo



Joined: 04 Mar 2013
Posts: 1581
Location: Berlin

PostPosted: Tue Aug 22, 2017 7:04 pm    Post subject: erm Reply with quote

Well for those who waxed lyrical about affordable housing, my landlord's just offered me a rent decrease only if I pay 12 months rent in 1 cheque. If I don't I've got a 10% real increase if you include the fees too.

So in Abu Dhabi, if your company doesn't pay your rent expect to pay, 65-70,000 AED up front for your studio, then the commission and the deposit and then all the furniture and the deposits for the electricity company and the chilled water company. I'd say that's the best part of $28,000 up front before you've earned a penny.

A pint of beer is close to $13 now Smile
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nomad soul



Joined: 31 Jan 2010
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PostPosted: Wed Aug 23, 2017 6:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm not sure why you saw this as yet another "rent and beer costs" situation. The article is about private schools having to cut into their profits and raise school fees in order to fork out more in pay and bennies to compete for well qualified k12 teachers.
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dragonpiwo



Joined: 04 Mar 2013
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PostPosted: Wed Aug 23, 2017 7:14 am    Post subject: erm Reply with quote

Because I'm here and know what they are paying these new 'highly qualified' teachers at ADEC and MOE.

The 21k all in offer is what it is. Come here with eyes wide open.
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nomad soul



Joined: 31 Jan 2010
Posts: 11249
Location: The real world

PostPosted: Wed Aug 23, 2017 7:22 am    Post subject: Re: erm Reply with quote

dragonpiwo wrote:
Because I'm here and know what they are paying these new 'highly qualified' teachers at ADEC and MOE.

The 21k all in offer is what it is. Come here with eyes wide open.

Again, the article is about private k12 schools -- the ones expats (including Britons, Americans, Canadians...) send their children to. It has nothing to do with the government MOE or ADEC schools.
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dragonpiwo



Joined: 04 Mar 2013
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PostPosted: Wed Aug 23, 2017 4:50 pm    Post subject: hmmmmmmm Reply with quote

Just out of interest Nomad: Do you still live here?
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veiledsentiments



Joined: 20 Feb 2003
Posts: 17567
Location: USA

PostPosted: Thu Aug 24, 2017 12:40 am    Post subject: Re: hmmmmmmm Reply with quote

dragonpiwo wrote:
Just out of interest Nomad: Do you still live here?

So? Merely trying to keep you on topic it seems to me.

Back to that topic...

There is a point that is not really covered in this article. With so many "married with kids" teachers being axed by the major employers like HCT... plus the fact that government employed expat teachers have had their education allowances chopped in half... aren't these private international schools going to be losing lots of students?

They may end up needing fewer teachers when all the dust settles.

VS
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Golden Beach



Joined: 09 Jun 2016
Posts: 27

PostPosted: Thu Aug 24, 2017 8:21 am    Post subject: Re: erm Reply with quote

dragonpiwo wrote:
Because I'm here and know what they are paying these new 'highly qualified' teachers at ADEC and MOE.

The 21k all in offer is what it is. Come here with eyes wide open.


If you live on the East Coast it works out pretty nicely...... rents are very reasonable.
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nomad soul



Joined: 31 Jan 2010
Posts: 11249
Location: The real world

PostPosted: Thu Aug 24, 2017 12:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

veiledsentiments wrote:
There is a point that is not really covered in this article. With so many "married with kids" teachers being axed by the major employers like HCT... plus the fact that government employed expat teachers have had their education allowances chopped in half... aren't these private international schools going to be losing lots of students?

Maybe not a big decrease since many non-western children of non-teaching parents also attend these schools. Plus, you have to account for population growth of babies born in the UAE and children coming from abroad.
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veiledsentiments



Joined: 20 Feb 2003
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PostPosted: Thu Aug 24, 2017 2:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The harm will be at the top schools as fewer and fewer education related expats - the ones who want and had been able to (almost) afford spots - will be there with their kids. Places like HCT, ZU, and UAEU are now turning away from hiring married teachers and focusing on cheaper singles. Halving the education allowance was specifically put in to push out the current family contracts.

And they are the parents who demand that the schools have qualified US/UK teachers... the expensive ones.

VS
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nomad soul



Joined: 31 Jan 2010
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PostPosted: Sun Aug 27, 2017 1:24 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

veiledsentiments wrote:
The harm will be at the top schools as fewer and fewer education related expats - the ones who want and had been able to (almost) afford spots - will be there with their kids.

Possibly. According to a recent article, UAE leads globally in number of students in international schools, the "UAE slipped to second with the most number of English premium international schools with 596, just behind China which leads the global market with 620." The UAE was at the top of the list last year. However, second place is still impressive considering how tiny the UAE is compared to China.
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veiledsentiments



Joined: 20 Feb 2003
Posts: 17567
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PostPosted: Sun Aug 27, 2017 2:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The difference is that in China education, expats are mostly young and single, whereas in the UAE, married with kids had been the majority... because that was what the employers wanted. They were looking for stability.

Now they are looking for cheap. This will be the first year of only half the usual education allowance. The sinking ship of UAE education pay and benefits... and the more rapidly dropping numbers will start showing up this fall. There have been families (and singles) who returned from leave this month to learn that they had been axed...

Reality hasn't hit these schools... or the writer of this article. Not that this sort of fact tends to hit the media in the UAE.

VS
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