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Rookie needing advice
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7seas



Joined: 24 Mar 2003
Posts: 6

PostPosted: Tue Apr 01, 2003 4:15 pm    Post subject: Rookie needing advice Reply with quote

I'm just finnishing up my TESOL course and getting ready to start applying for jobs. I need some help getting started.

I don't have a degree or an EU passport. What options does that leave me as far as location?

Most of the posted job vacancies are in the capitals and major cities. Does anyone have any suggestions on where to find listings of schoos in smaller towns?

Any other advice or warnings for an absolute beginner?

Thanks
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scot47



Joined: 10 Jan 2003
Posts: 12395
Location: Ultima Thule

PostPosted: Tue Apr 01, 2003 6:50 pm    Post subject: the world is a big place Reply with quote

You give no indication of where you want to go. You must have some idea !!!! China, South America, Kazakhstan ?
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roadrunner



Joined: 09 Mar 2003
Posts: 22
Location: London, UK

PostPosted: Tue Apr 01, 2003 8:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Why not try the Yellow Pages for the areas you are interested in working?

Also, try and get hold of a very useful book, a real mine of information, entitled Teaching English Abroad.[/i]
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7seas



Joined: 24 Mar 2003
Posts: 6

PostPosted: Tue Apr 01, 2003 9:32 pm    Post subject: Thanks Reply with quote

I'm open to different locations because I plan to do this for a long time and hope to see a lot of the world. I'm thinking maybe I should try Eastern Europe first before all these countries join the EU and that option is out.
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Glenski



Joined: 15 Jan 2003
Posts: 12844
Location: Hokkaido, JAPAN

PostPosted: Tue Apr 01, 2003 11:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Rookie,
It helps to know you don't have a degree. It also helps to know what your age and nationality are. Visas are often dependent on all of that information.

For what it's worth, here's another book that may be of interest.

A Japanese Visa Handbook by Motoko Kuroda, ICG Muse, Inc.
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7seas



Joined: 24 Mar 2003
Posts: 6

PostPosted: Wed Apr 02, 2003 2:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm a 29 year old Canadian woman.
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Glenski



Joined: 15 Jan 2003
Posts: 12844
Location: Hokkaido, JAPAN

PostPosted: Wed Apr 02, 2003 2:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thank you, 7seas.

Canadians without bachelor degrees can apply for the working holiday visa, then they can come to Japan without having a job in hand. This doesn't guarantee a job, of course, but being in Japan is a great advantage because you can show up for more interviews and you can see the employer and housing instead of trusting an overseas interview.

If you are still interested in Japan, let me know by email for more info.
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chi-chi



Joined: 16 Jan 2003
Posts: 127
Location: Back in Asia!

PostPosted: Sun Apr 13, 2003 12:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Taiwan is also an option for you.
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Kent F. Kruhoeffer



Joined: 22 Jan 2003
Posts: 2129
Location: 中国

PostPosted: Mon Apr 14, 2003 10:02 am    Post subject: hello rookie! Reply with quote

Hello 7-Seas:

In your follow-up post, you mentioned your hopes of finding EFL employment in eastern Europe ... before the EU expansion is in full swing. Be advised, that expansion has already begun; I recently saw an advert here on Dave's for a school in Slovakia that wanted only EU passport holders to apply. Ouch!

On top of that, it's been my experience that most European language schools (East and West) look VERY favorably on a 4-year degree. Without that degree, you're entering a brave new marketplace in which degree-less EFL teachers often accept less-than-ideal positions; work horrible hours and earn peanuts. Some work illegally (which I would not recommend) and some are forced to take LOTS of privates just to make ends meet.

7-Seas: What I'm saying is this: The TESOL certificate alone will not make you competitive in the European EFL market. As much as you may have your heart set on Europe, I'd have to say that you'd be better off taking Glenski's advice on the working-holiday visa for Japan. China is another good alternative. In both of these countries, you can be competitive, earn a decent living and have a lot of fun too. I spent 2 years in Japan and would HIGHLY recommend it.

For a 29 year old woman, Japan has the added advantage of being the safest country in the world to live in. That's only my opinion, but I've been around the block a time or 2. Trust me; Japan has your name on it!

Best wishes, Cool
kEnt


Last edited by Kent F. Kruhoeffer on Mon Apr 14, 2003 10:18 am; edited 1 time in total
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rogan



Joined: 03 Mar 2003
Posts: 416
Location: at home, in France

PostPosted: Mon Apr 14, 2003 10:17 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

As a Canadian you can virtually forget the whole of Western Europe.

As of Jan 1st 2004 another 15 countries from Central and Eastern Europe will join the EU - so that will very soon be out.

Your major problem is the fact that you have no Degree.
Sadly opportunities are restricted - most employers will select those people who are more highly qualified.

Therefore I suggest you concentrate on those countries which have easy visa situations for Canadians as well as limited qualification requirements for working and a high demand for native speaker 'teachers'
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scot47



Joined: 10 Jan 2003
Posts: 12395
Location: Ultima Thule

PostPosted: Mon Apr 14, 2003 12:10 pm    Post subject: Europe ? Reply with quote

Europe ? You could try Belarus. They are unlikely to become EU members for a long time.
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travellingscot



Joined: 27 Jan 2003
Posts: 64
Location: UK/Eastern Europe

PostPosted: Mon Apr 14, 2003 6:06 pm    Post subject: Forget Bulgaria Reply with quote

I'm trying to work in Bulgaria for personal reasons and have TESOL but no degree.I've done a lot of leg work and knocked on many doors but the answer is always the same--you cannot work in the state system unless you have a degree,even in hairdressing !! Private language schools will be very pleased to employ you but can only offer you a few hours each week at about 1.5 euros per hour,and that will not support you as you would need perhaps 50 hours each week to survive. It's a nice country so try by all means,you might get lucky. I have a few other avenues to explore before i give up and if i manage to get a work permit i'll let you know in case you want to try.
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scot47



Joined: 10 Jan 2003
Posts: 12395
Location: Ultima Thule

PostPosted: Sat May 03, 2003 5:24 am    Post subject: Forget Bulgaria ? Reply with quote

Even in the state system you would not earn much more than that. Most Bulgarian teachers have two - or three - jobs. Maybe now you are beginning to understand why Bulgarians ask "stupid questions" about why you want to go and work there ?

A Bulgarian graduate teacher earns for a basic working week about 200 Bulgarian Leva a month. That is just under 100 Euros. Working overtime and taking private students might take that up to 200 Euros(ie 400 BGL).
According to the Bulgarian Trade Unions an income of 1100 BGL is required for a family of two adults and two children.

Still interested ?
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stellamarie



Joined: 03 May 2003
Posts: 1
Location: Seattle

PostPosted: Sat May 03, 2003 8:42 pm    Post subject: another North American rookie Reply with quote

Hi - I have been reading this diologue and am wanting clarification - I am an American who is hoping to go abroad to teach English in the near future. If I am understanding this correctly, I might as well forget about finding work in any country that is now or is soon to become a member of the EU - is that right? To be clear, I am not "whining" or saying this is "nonsense" - it makes perfect sense, it's just disappointing is all! It is not something that is discussed on any of the tefl schools' sites I have looked at so I didn't realize it would be a problem.

Thanks,
Stella
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Celeste



Joined: 17 Jan 2003
Posts: 814
Location: Fukuoka City, Japan

PostPosted: Sun May 04, 2003 1:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Stellamarie-

You have hit the nail on the head. For a non EU member country citizen to get a job in the EU, the employer has to sponsor a work visa for the particular country in which the job is available. To do this, they must prove that the job can't be filled by an EU member country citizen.

Unfortunately for you (and me), there are a lot of UK native English speakers who are very qualified as EFL teachers and would love to take these jobs. I suppose, that if a school was really keen to hire someone who had an American accent, then they could hire you, but I don't think most schools are about to go to all the trouble of arranging a work visa just for a different accent.

Now the good news: there are a lot of jobs in Asia. Some of them even say "American or Canadian native English spaker preferred."

I am working in Japan right now, and I am enjoying it immensely. I still want to spend some time in France (not just vacation time) so I will probably use some of the money I earn in Japan to finance a year of living there as a student.
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