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The most enjoyable

 
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dmb



Joined: 12 Feb 2003
Posts: 8397

PostPosted: Thu Apr 24, 2003 8:50 am    Post subject: The most enjoyable Reply with quote

My last posting asked where are the laziest students. How about the best. Where in the world do you find the best teaching environment. I have to admit I'm a turkophile and I think the best classes are at private language schools in Turkey. Anyone care to disagree?
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Kent F. Kruhoeffer



Joined: 22 Jan 2003
Posts: 2129
Location: 中国

PostPosted: Thu Apr 24, 2003 11:15 am    Post subject: la dolce vita Reply with quote

Hello again dmb:

This might sound 'cute', but in my 14 years in EFL, I'd have to say that 'enjoyable' is a relative term in the sense that every nationality has its own unique and endearing traits.

In plain English, I've enjoyed ALL of the students I've taught, but for different reasons.

A few examples to illustrate my point: Filipinos were the most 'down-to-earth-friendly' and fun-loving people I've ever met or taught. Japanese were the most playful and polite, whereas Turks were the most hospitable and respectful of their teachers. Romanians, although poor as farm mice, seemed to have the most genuine 'inner' spirits, while Koreans were just plain 'nice' to teach in a general sense. (excluding the Korean kids, who were, for the most part, little demons from Hell. Twisted Evil

Russians, on the other hand, are the most analytical of the bunch, which is one of the reasons that Russia produces some of the world's finest chess players. Teaching Russians has also been a blessing in disguise for me professionally, since their analytical nature means they often ask the most difficult questions of their teachers, and you very quickly realize that you've become a better teacher because of it.

If I had to choose just one country or nationality as 'most enjoyable', it would be nearly impossible. So I won't even try. I luv 'em all. Wink I really do.

Regards,
keNT

DISCLAIMER: The above generalizations apply only to the author's personal experiences. Any reference to real persons, either living or dead, is purely coincidental.
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lagger



Joined: 08 Apr 2003
Posts: 40
Location: Australia

PostPosted: Thu Apr 24, 2003 11:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I teach in an English speaking country so my answer might be a little different from some.

I love students who actually want to be in class and are interested in learning English. When they are being 'forced' by someone to be there, it's not fun.

I sometimes have to teach English classes to the unemployed and they have to be there or their benefit will be cut. They are usually sullen, uncooperative and occasionally hostile.

As far as nationality, South/Central Americans are always a pleasure to teach. Although some are a little rowdy, they usually have great personalities.
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Guest






PostPosted: Thu Apr 24, 2003 12:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I would say the same of Spaniards. Although they may not have the serious study ethic to the same extent as you'd find in Asia, the classes, though a little rowdy, can be a lot of fun. I found it really refreshing to teach students who not only have an opinion, they're not afraid to express it.
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johnslat



Joined: 21 Jan 2003
Posts: 12903
Location: Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA

PostPosted: Thu Apr 24, 2003 1:55 pm    Post subject: Upsides and downsides Reply with quote

The " best " students I've ever has were Indonesians. But, every time you have an upside, it seems there has to be a downside. The one in this case was that the main reason the students were so motivated was this was a government sponsored program. Those who passed it, and got satisfactory TOEFL scores were going to be sent to the States to get their degrees. So, this was their one big chance to " grab the gold ring ", to change ther lives. Now, can you imagine how it must have felt to have to fail one of them?
Regards,
John
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D.O.S.



Joined: 02 Apr 2003
Posts: 108
Location: TOKYO (now)/ LONDON

PostPosted: Thu Apr 24, 2003 2:08 pm    Post subject: Best students? Reply with quote

Anywhere the students
actually pay their own
earned monies and not their
weekly allowance from
Mommy and Daddy!
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richard ame



Joined: 16 Jan 2003
Posts: 319
Location: Republic of Turkey

PostPosted: Fri Apr 25, 2003 6:45 am    Post subject: The best students Reply with quote

Hi Dmb
Your posting aroused my interest, I wondered how long have you being in Turkey? The picture you paint is not one I have witnessed ,true you do have good and bad but after almost 10 years I think I have seen most of the best and a lot of the other .Private language schools tend to have pretty small classes and generally the "environment" is conducive to learning ,god help you if you ever had to stand in front of 35 plus out of control spoilt rich kids at a REAL private school ,go tell me I'm wrong sad bitter and twisted .
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richard ame



Joined: 16 Jan 2003
Posts: 319
Location: Republic of Turkey

PostPosted: Fri Apr 25, 2003 6:46 am    Post subject: The best students Reply with quote

Hi Dmb
Your posting aroused my interest, I wondered how long have you being in Turkey? The picture you paint is not one I have witnessed ,true you do have good and bad but after almost 10 years I think I have seen most of the best and a lot of the other .Private language schools tend to have pretty small classes and generally the "environment" is conducive to learning ,god help you if you ever had to stand in front of 35 plus out of control spoilt rich kids at a REAL private school ,go tell me I'm wrong sad bitter and twisted .
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dmb



Joined: 12 Feb 2003
Posts: 8397

PostPosted: Mon Apr 28, 2003 9:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Richard I was in Turkey for about ten years and yes I did most of my teaching at private language schools, mostly in Istanbul. I had great classes. Also most of the time I was DOS, ADOS or teacher trainer so maybe students gave more respect. On the other hand I"m now in the Gulf and maybe looking at my time in Turkey through rose tinted glasses. I can't wait to get back though
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