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Australians TEFL in Italy?

 
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mozsmith



Joined: 20 Oct 2004
Posts: 35

PostPosted: Tue Oct 26, 2004 11:27 am    Post subject: Australians TEFL in Italy? Reply with quote

I was just curious to see if any Australians were teaching in Italy at the moment. I am finishing my degree this year and looking at doing a course in either Italy or Spain. I would prefer Spain, however I have heard that Australia has a working agreement with Italy.

Can anyone tell me the details on this?

Thanks!
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riachelini



Joined: 25 Nov 2004
Posts: 5

PostPosted: Fri Dec 03, 2004 12:30 am    Post subject: work visa for aussies Reply with quote

Hi,
I applied for and recieved a one year working holiday visa for Italy - yes its a new thing introduced in Jan 2004 - an agreement between the two countries to promote greater cultural exchange. I think there are about 1000 visas issued each year by the country - fairly straightforward, you have to be between 18-30years old to apply - do this at the Italian embassy in your state. It takes a couple of weeks to be issued. Getting the visa in Oz is no prob, although when I arrived in Italy, noone seemed to have seen-heard of it - may have been where I was - wasnt in the cities. Make sure you know exactly what it entitles you to before going, so that people dont get confused with work permit types which means your supposed to have work already lined up. because your Australian (separate to the work visa) you will also be entitled to their equivalent of Medicare. I found the Italian beuacracy a nightmare in relation to my visa and although it was supposed to be effective from April this year, they werent going to give me an appointment to start processing it - and give me legal rights to work until June. After some persistence that was changed to May! Even so, my complete documents werent ready until September - although this did not prevent me from working (they give you a slip of paper in the meantime!!) Italy is a wonderful country to live and travel in, (expensive though) Didnt teach english , did summer work so not sure what teaching work is around, how much it pays etc. You should check out the Italian embassy website in Oz am sure it will have all the info there.
good luck!
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ps2_machine



Joined: 29 Apr 2004
Posts: 22
Location: korea

PostPosted: Mon Dec 13, 2004 2:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

As an Australian myself,
What qualifications/experience do I need to teach EFL in Italy?

What are my chances of gaining an ESL position having no intention of getting a TEFL certificate but having 1 year of ESL experience?
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Teacher in Rome



Joined: 09 Jul 2003
Posts: 1211

PostPosted: Mon Dec 13, 2004 9:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Interesting information, Riachelini. I didn't realise that Australians can get this visa. Are Italian employers still able to employ you with the same ease as they employ other Europeans? (I mean that they don't have to "sponsor" you etc.)

As for ps2 - life ain't exactly a bowl of cherries at the moment. There's not much work around (in Rome - can't speak for other places) and the work there is normally goes to teachers who also have teaching qualifications. I wouldn't go so far as to say you're not as good a teacher as someone with a certificate, but companies / clients often expect teachers to have at least a certificate. In order to compete - and to show that you are serious - I'd suggest you get a certificate.
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ps2_machine



Joined: 29 Apr 2004
Posts: 22
Location: korea

PostPosted: Tue Dec 14, 2004 9:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for the information.

My father's nationality is Italian, meaning I can get an Italian passport if I really want one. So, sponsorship may not be necessary.

As for getting a certificate, I will think about it. It will certainly be a last resort option for me and that's it. I am sure there are ways to find a teaching job without getting a certificate. I believe teaching experience is more valuable than a 50 hour or so teaching certificate without experience. At the same time, having a certificate and experience would obviously be more valuable.

It actually makes me confused why there is so much emphasis on a short term TEFL certificate. Is someone going to tell me that anybody with a TEFL certificate who has no cultural, second language and teaching experience is better than one who has all of these without a short term TEFL certificate? It is only a point of view of course.

Once again, thanks for the information.
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spiral78



Joined: 05 Apr 2004
Posts: 9364
Location: On a Short Leash

PostPosted: Tue Dec 14, 2004 3:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

A 120-hour on-site course offering supervised teaching practice and an introduction into second language learning theory and method gives a new teacher a big headstart in terms of standing before a class. When you say 'short' course, you seem to mean a 40-hour course with no practicuum. Not comparable.
Further, I've seen teacher-trainees on courses who have already taught for a year before taking the course. Their starting point is very often not higher than those with no experience at all -
You may be a fine, talented teacher, but a practical course will only add to your value as a teacher.
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ps2_machine



Joined: 29 Apr 2004
Posts: 22
Location: korea

PostPosted: Tue Dec 14, 2004 4:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I don't claim to be superman, and I certainly have less experience than those who have taught ESL for many years. In fact, teaching ESL is not my first career choice. In fact, I am not in the ESL industry now. However, I am sure I can learn a lot more (from courses, from other teachers, from more experience, reading on other people's experiences in websites, etc).

I meant a short course as 80 hours in length, or about that. Certainly by no means they are a BA or DipED or MA. Am I right about this?

Another note, I am happy to get responses from you all. Everyone is helpful and friendly.
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Gregorio



Joined: 17 Aug 2004
Posts: 105

PostPosted: Fri Dec 31, 2004 7:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Just want to add my thoughts to the possible disrespect shown to a challenging TEFL course. I took a CTEFL course in Rome. It was definitely worth it.

I also took this course with a person who had already taught English in Japan for three years. Of all the students, she was the only one with "professional" English teaching experience, but she didn't have a TEFL certificate or any other teaching credentials. She was also the most nervous and terrified person taking the course. This was because she had never been anlayzed as a teacher with such intense scrutiny until the TEFL course.

A 120 hour, intensive TEFL course forces you to be on your toes and productive in all aspects of teaching. Sure, it's only a month long, but it's a month with hardly a social life or any other thought that isn't related to the TEFL course. Every waking moment I was thinking about this course... and I wasn't alone.

OK... i'm done ranting.
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carte blanche



Joined: 01 Dec 2004
Posts: 2
Location: With my toes in the Rubicon

PostPosted: Thu Jan 06, 2005 5:01 am    Post subject: re: Australians TEFL in Italy? Reply with quote

Thanks riachelini for the details of your experience on the working holiday visa. I wonder if "the bureaucracy" will have a better idea of what is going on now that the visa has been in operation for a year?!
My main concern as someone wanting to teach english on the working holiday visa is the 3 month restriction on work with a single employer. When you finally got your work permit arranged, did it carry this stipulation? ie. Was the 3 month regulation enforced?
Thanks again for your earlier contribution.
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carte blanche



Joined: 01 Dec 2004
Posts: 2
Location: With my toes in the Rubicon

PostPosted: Thu Jan 06, 2005 5:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

hey riachelini -just re-read your original message (I made my post quite a long time after reading it) and realised that by putting 'the bureaucracy' in inverted commas it looks like I'm some complete tosser intent on drawing attention to your ealier error. No no no! It's just that I find the idea of bureaucracy strange (imagine so much activity all grossed towards preventing activity) despite the infuriation it causes.
Egad! Why cannot I express myself clearly?
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